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I’ve been shooting a spott Hogg fast Eddie xl 2 pin sight. I’ve loved how accurate I am with it, but concerned about speed of target acquisition. Had a broadside shot at a bull in the open last fall. He went from 90 to about 45 yards walking at an angle in front of me toward my buddy cow calling. I was kneeling in sage brush in the open and alternating between my spotting scope and adjusting my slidder (no trees or rocks to use as reference). After drawing, the bull moved even closer and jumped the string. Anyways I went right over his shoulder and now I’m considering ditching the single pin for a 3, 4 or 5 pin. Maybe even one with a slidder in case I want to be more precise. Wondering what you western and long range hunters are using for sights?
 

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I’ve been shooting a spott Hogg fast Eddie xl 2 pin sight. I’ve loved how accurate I am with it, but concerned about speed of target acquisition. Had a broadside shot at a bull in the open last fall. He went from 90 to about 45 yards walking at an angle in front of me toward my buddy cow calling. I was kneeling in sage brush in the open and alternating between my spotting scope and adjusting my slidder (no trees or rocks to use as reference). After drawing, the bull moved even closer and jumped the string. Anyways I went right over his shoulder and now I’m considering ditching the single pin for a 3, 4 or 5 pin. Maybe even one with a slidder in case I want to be more precise. Wondering what you western and long range hunters are using for sights?
Lots of people will laugh, and I don't even care, if they do. I love my Spot Hogg Grinder MRT 7-pin for elk hunting. And everything else.

Mine is set 20-80, and I practice at every gap between those pins too. If a bull or buck walks into a shot opportunity, I just draw, aim, release.. No prior slider/dial adjustments required.

Some would says, "but you don't have 3rd Axis adjustments with that!".
Well...3rd Axis doesn't even come into play except with steep up/down angles, starting after 50 yards. Because I practice a lot and think about these things, the way those pin adjustments are, I can angle each one, very slightly, progressively back at me, at just the right slight pitch, to have perfect 3rd Axis adjustments out to 80 yards.

I've taken my 7-pin sights on 7 backcountry, horsepack Idaho elk hunts. In that time, I've seen a couple of hunters get their fancy, expensive slider/dial, 1-2# extra weight, mechanical contraptions completely ruined. That also ruined, at least a couple of days of their hunts of a lifetime, because there ain't no pro shops up their.

I never had to touch my sight though, under any adverse circumstances, because it's nearly indestructible.

I'm an old codger though, so don't listen to me.
 

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Mathews Mission Craze
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I have been shooting a 30-06 Outdoors Aluma 5-pin for almost 10 years now. I had the adjustable stuff, and I found in low light situations I had trouble reading my marks, it was an added thing to do while I'm already excited over an animal and just not worth it. Is the fixed sight fancy? no. Is it super adjustable for changing every day? no. I found when I'm shooting poorly it's my fault and not my sight. Having one less thing to think about and knowing exactly how my sight will perform every time is what I like. It can't hurt to try a fixed pins sight, you might find you like them!
 

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My eyes have gotten old enough to make my decision for me. Back in the day I loved my option 8 and 7 pin black golds, then I wen to 5 pin sliders then 3 pin sliders. I have a double pin spot Hogg and a single pin ascent I’m kinda leaning on the ascent for me this year again. Not any other reason than it helps me pick up the pin and target while wearing transition lenses. If my vision was still strong I would stick to a 3 pin slider best of both worlds. Open sight picture close distances are covered and if I need to snap shoot at 50 plus yards I probably should not be shooting if there’s not 3 seconds to spin the dial.


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The Impartial Archer
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I don't take long so I really like a 3 pin sight because it's 0 - 40 (45 with a little hold off) and you really can't get the pins confused.........it's top bottom or middle.

Maybe a 3 pin or 3 pin slider? Most of the animals I shoot are moving and the distances almost always seem to be changing and as a bow hunter I REALLY like to wait for the closer shots even if I cost me the animal......maybe that's why all my shots are so close? I have never liked the idea of 1 pin personally for me and the way I hunt.

That and my bow only shoots 250's it use to only shoot 230 until last year because I bought a new bow after a LONG time but I still like having the multiple pins for more references. The faster the bow and the shorter distances you shoot favors one pin (IMO). If you aren't shooting super fast I think you are better of with multi pins.....or you'll have to move a 1 pin.

Last I'm sure the bull reacted but you probably aimed dead on with the pin out of habit and it was still set way too high so it was a combination of both it reacting some and the POI being way too high.

How fast is your bow shooting?
 
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I had the regular 3 pin head on my Tommy Hogg and it worked great, but I'm mostly hunting Whitetail now, shots under 40 yards, so went back to the double pin, which I shoot more accurately. I'm even considering a single pin head.

That said, if I was going on an elk hunt again I'd have at least a 3 pin, maybe the triple stack head, if not the 5 pin (I don't care for the clutter of 5 pins, though) . I'd keep the slider for sure.

You can usually find used Spot Hogg heads on here for decent price, or order one with the 3rd axis adapter from S and S and keep your double pin setup as well.

 

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Bowtech Realm SR6
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They're not cheap, but it sounds like the best solution to your concern would be a multi-pin slider with multiple yardage referenes, a la the MBG Dual Trac or the Triple Stacc that Mossy-Back recommended.

That way you can still dial in a slider for long precise shots, but you can also shoot the gaps on the fly if an animal moves. And with multiple reference points on the tape, you can have decent confidence when shooting between the pins, even if you have the slider dialed out.
 

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Blazing Nate, I am in total agreement with BigXX78. I use a 5 pin sight. For me a slider is just one more variable I need to worry about as last minute changes happen. I can't see the sight tapes now anyway unless I wear reading glasses.
 

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I suggest a 3pin slider, set pins to 20, 30, 40 and have your 40 the slider. That way you are covered up to 40 and anything beyond that use the slider. A good 5pin fixed is good option as well, but with the 5pin though I find myself taking extra time to figure what pin to use. I don't have that that prob with the 3pin. My mind knows the pins automatically with no double-checking if on correct one. You wouldn't think there would be a difference, but there is for me. Others probably don't have that problem though, but mentioning as something to consider.
 

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Elite Envision
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HHA used to make a 3 pin slider. Its still a pretty uncluttered sight picture, although not as good as a 1-pin. I had top set to 20, middle pin to 30 and bottom (which i used as the slider) to 40. If you ever need longer than 40, you should have plenty of time to make adjustments.
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I suggest a 3pin slider, set pins to 20, 30, 40 and have your 40 the slider. That way you are covered up to 40 and anything beyond that use the slider. A good 5pin fixed is good option as well, but with the 5pin though I find myself taking extra time to figure what pin to use. I don't have that that prob with the 3pin. My mind knows the pins automatically with no double-checking if on correct one. You wouldn't think there would be a difference, but there is for me. Others probably don't have that problem though, but mentioning as something to consider.
I couldn't say this better. Also with distance, comes time and opportunity to be more flexible and dial. So having that bottom pin the slider works well. Some of the newer 3 pin sliders have dual yardage indicators, so both the top and bottom pin can slide to know yardages and you can use either one.

I
 

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I used 5 pin and 7 pin fixed for years. Variable pin colors helped me to easily know which pin was which. Like @BigXX78, I liked being able to simply select which pin was needed when a bull gave a shot opportunity. As you found out, they often move on you. They wander closer, or they catch you drawing and turn to bugger out and you stop them but now they're 20-30 yards farther, etc., etc.
I recently went to an Option sight, so I have 3 fixed pins and then a 4th slider pin. So I basically have a 4 pin fixed, but can flip the fixed pin window open and have that clean one pin sight picture if I want.
I think a 3 pin hybrid mover wouldn't be bad, gives you 20-30-40 and if they're farther than that you'll likely be able to dial the mover pin to what you need without being detected.
 

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Some would says, "but you don't have 3rd Axis adjustments with that!".
Well...3rd Axis doesn't even come into play except with steep up/down angles, starting after 50 yards. Because I practice a lot and think about these things, the way those pin adjustments are, I can angle each one, very slightly, progressively back at me, at just the right slight pitch, to have perfect 3rd Axis adjustments out to 80 yards.

I’m trying to understand your 3rd axis method, but it’s not computing…
Would you mind describing it another way?

OP- Good choice going back to multipin.
My preference is a Option Archery 5 pin slider.

I like that only the pin moves, and not the housing.
 

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This is such an individual preference topic that no one can accurately inform another on what really works best for THEM. I've tried multiple pin sights and they simply do not work well for me in the woods under hunting conditions. In practice I can differentiate colors and positions, but when taking a hunting shot it isn't effective. That could be a result of starting with a fixed single pin sight, then going to a fixed slider on my competitive FITA target bow. Followed by 30 years of instinctive shooting/hunting with recurves without a sight. After going back and forth from single to four to single to two to single....there is no comparison in regards to focus for ME.

Set at 20 yards, I can easily gap out to 35 when there isn't time to reset. When there is I quickly dial to the correct distance and focus on shot execution. Changing because one situation didn't work out would mean a bunch of multiple pin shooters who messed up by picking the incorrect pin or "flock shooting" under pressure should bail on their current sight as well. If you need more than one, there a two and three pin sliders that blend the advantages of both into one package.
 

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I’m trying to understand your 3rd axis method, but it’s not computing…
Would you mind describing it another way?

OP- Good choice going back to multipin.
My preference is a Option Archery 5 pin slider.

I like that only the pin moves, and not the housing.
It's a tedious process, but each pin has 2 small adjustment screws. If you loosen both screws, the pins will wiggle very slightly, in all directions. Then if you hold them in place and retighten then, each pin will stay in that position, even though it's not 100% level and plumb within the housing. On my 60, 70, & 80 yard pins, I just turn them, very slightly back toward me and very slightly upward. When I lock them down in that position, they're still aligned properly for level ground shots, and when I take those long shots at steep angles, my arrows stay right on target. On my bow, they were missing right, by just a couple of inches, before I did this hack.
 

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I was kneeling in sage brush in the open and alternating between my spotting scope and adjusting my slider (no trees or rocks to use as reference).
I've often thought of that being a problem on my hunting bows. Hunting deer and elk over the past 40-50+ years, it seems that more than half the time, opportunities develop over a matter of seconds, (that seem longer). Unless the range is within 25-30yds, the dance of ranging without being seen, getting the bow in position for a shot, etc. adjusting the sight is just one too many events. My trusty old Hoggs, all with 5 pins adjusted to the same ranges, minimal things to worry about.
 
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