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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking this would be a good thread to have for reference around here for Western hunters....

Everyone chime in on what they are planning on taking in regards to first aid supplies for hunting and why. Maybe some of the guys on here that are doctors, EMT's, or medics from the military can give some good advice.:D

As for me, I'm still putting togther my needs list, but I'm going to pick up some of the silver QuikClot sport packages to have in my first aid kit for my elk hunt this year. I've been reading alot of great things about this stuff and Cabelas has started carrying it.

Does anyone know where to get the medical grade super-glu stuff? I'd also like to have that as well. I'm going to modify my little hunter first aid kit and make it good to go for my needs.

Chime in guys!!!! Maybe we'll learn something!

-ZA
 

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I'm going to pick up some of the silver QuikClot sport packages
Ya, except for the Quickclot that I asked about in a thread earlier, I pretty much have everything that I may need. I'll add the QC this year and should be good to go.......hopefully.
 

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I take one of Adventure Medical Kits with me.

They have basically everything.

Duct tape is always good. My buddy actually cuts a plastic pen in half, takes the housing and then wraps duct tape around that. Saves space and weight.

also carry a quick clot package with me.
 

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I don't know how much you guys know about quikclot but it's some nasty stuff. Not something for the average joe to use. You certainly aint going to be able to use it on yourself (if you can you have more determination than lance armstrong!) because that stuff is the same thing as sticking your foot into a campfire and not being able to pull it out. It burns and there's no way to stop it until the chemical reaction is over. . .

It works on a chemical reaction and basically just cauterizes anything it comes in contact with. If it's wet it's gonna burn. THAT INCLUDES YOUR EYES!!! So open the packet down wind of your face. Make sure that nothing but the wound is wet (ie your hands will burn too if their bloody).

When we were trained to use it in the military it was only directed to be used if a tourniquet has been applied and not working. I would have to guess if a tourniquet doesn't stop the bleeding your pretty much F'ed anyway. Quikclot is a waste of time, money, and space for backcountry hunting. IMO

Just my .02, Kelpy
 

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I plan on getting a field surgical kit at the military surplus and some quick clot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
FYI, the newer stuff doesn't cauterize/burn, and the exothermic reaction is limited to a temp of roughly 100F (body temp). They also don't really sell it in powder/granular form anymore, it's in mesh pouches and on gauze that you stuff into the wounds. The QuikClot "Sport" stuff is for everyday folks to use, no training needed.

-ZA

I don't know how much you guys know about quikclot but it's some nasty stuff. Not something for the average joe to use. You certainly aint going to be able to use it on yourself (if you can you have more determination than lance armstrong!) because that stuff is the same thing as sticking your foot into a campfire and not being able to pull it out. It burns and there's no way to stop it until the chemical reaction is over. . .

It works on a chemical reaction and basically just cauterizes anything it comes in contact with. If it's wet it's gonna burn. THAT INCLUDES YOUR EYES!!! So open the packet down wind of your face. Make sure that nothing but the wound is wet (ie your hands will burn too if their bloody).

When we were trained to use it in the military it was only directed to be used if a tourniquet has been applied and not working. I would have to guess if a tourniquet doesn't stop the bleeding your pretty much F'ed anyway. Quikclot is a waste of time, money, and space for backcountry hunting. IMO

Just my .02, Kelpy
 

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I take duct tape, but as someone else said I wrap it around a pen well around 5 or 6 of them I like about 30 feet of the stuff. Comes in handy for alot of things. Most of it goes in the pack but I also leave some in the truck. I always have an ALS level bag in my truck so that has major incidents covered if we are close. All in all I take about 3 pounds of medical gear with me in my pack.

- Duct Tape
- 4-5 Tampons
- Roller gauze ( kerlix), North american rescue has most of the stuff shrink wrapped to save space
- QC
-CAT tourniquet
-Aleve
-Tums
-Iodine tabs
- Loctite Super glue works great for cuts.

FYI, the newer stuff doesn't cauterize/burn, and the exothermic reaction is limited to a temp of roughly 100F (body temp). They also don't really sell it in powder/granular form anymore, it's in mesh pouches and on gauze that you stuff into the wounds. The QuikClot "Sport" stuff is for everyday folks to use, no training needed.

Thats exactly right..... he must have been out of the game for a bit.


Fits into a gallon zip loc bag and stays out of hte way in my pack.
 

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1 roll of gauze
1 flat package of duct tape
moleskin
10 various bandaids
1 roll athletic tape
water purifier tablets
extra shoestrings and parachute cord (various uses)
spare matches and lighter

It all fits in a 3"x5"x2 zippered bad that is red and get stored in an easily accessible pouch of my pack. If I need anything more, I am out of luck and I will have to actually use my brain to figure out what can work to save my sorry butt.:zip:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Doing a little more reading and it's looking like a newer product called CELOX is even better than QuikClot. I think I'll add that to my med kit.

-ZA
 

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Some added items

I would add Uncle Bill's Tweezers--light and the best point to get any sliver out and self-adhering tape instead of athletic tape (one brand is Coban). Used this over my cut finger extensor tendon 5 miles back in the wilderness to stop bleeding and splint the finger with great results. Also, never leave home without duct tape and dental floss. I agree that regular Superglue can work in a pinch, but remember, it doesn't go in a wound and doesn't work well until you get the bleeding stopped. I use butterfly bandages (Steri-strips) to hold a cut together and use direct pressure to stop all bleeding and then cover with 2-4 light layers of Superglue; then cover with tape/bandage. Quickclot may have a role in some situations, but direct pressure works in nearly all. Tourniquets make sense when the choice is between bleeding to death or risk losing the limb. After 16 years in an ER, I never saw a QuickClot like product alone stop that kind of bleeding (and I have used it in lots of various situations). That being said, I have used it at times and it can help.

If you have access to drugs, best single antibiotic for GI infection (the bacterial stuff) is Ciprofloxacin and most cost effective antibiotic for skin infection is probably Erythromycin. Ibuprofen type drug is a must in my kit and I bring 3-5 narcotic pain pills. Once had a buddy pass a kidney stone in the backcountry and also have had to help someone out with a torn Achilles heel--both more painful than Ibuprofen could cover.
 

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it's not necessarily medical but nonetheless, last year we got some Acli-Mate which helps prevent altitude sickness (AMS) and it was a great addition to our water, plus really feel it provided me some extra energy. Has a bunch of good-for-you, all natural indredients. Sorry, it's a drink mixture! add it to your water

check it out. Also, Emergen-C might be something else to take to maintain an edge when your body begins to weaken.
 

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Tourniquets are not the evil things that many first aid instructors have made them out to be. I was at a EMS conference that a hand and plastic surgeon was speaking at and the take home message from him was don't be afraid to use one, thousands of people go into OR's every day and have them put on for hours on end only to have an OR nurse pop it loose at the end of the surgery and the Patients have no ill affects from it. They usually use the same ones that are used when you have blood drawn or an IV started. Remember the goal is to slow the bleeding so it will stop not use the devise to pinch of the limb, So only tighten it till you can see the blood slow and or stop.

You first aid kit should fit in a small zip lock bag.

Gloves
Triangle bandage
4X4's
Gauze roller bandage 3"or 4"
Assorted band-aids
Tape
Pen or other writing utensil.
Anti-biotic ointment of some kind.
good shears. (The cut any thing kind)
Broth (chicken or Beef, for when you are stuck in camp with the trots, or puking)
Some kind of a first aid guide or book. (if any one wants one I have some really small ones from bow hunters ED class I teach. I could send them for the cost of postage.)

Keep it simple if you don't know how to use it you don't need it.

Also have some

Advil, Tylenol, and a anti histamine, some of each are good to have on hand. also any meds that you or others you hunt with use. If one of your hunting partners takes meds on a regular basis have them teach you about it, it could save their life some day.
 

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I made my own with input from a friend who's a paramedic.

Its based in 2 parts.

Part 1, stored in a Blackhawk tac leg pouch, which contains the basics needed (usually lives under my drivers seat, but can be taken anywhere strapped to my leg or strapped to the side of my bergen)



It contains (starting from the back)
2 x triangular bandages
1 x small field dressing
1 x medium field dressing
2 x large field dressing
1 x small self adisive bandage
1 x large self adisive bandage
1 x finger dressing
1 x small burn gel pad
1 x shears
In unzipped pouch
1 x cpr mask
1 x eye wash
numerious plasters
Alcohol wipes
Cheap lock knife

In front pocket
1 x diposable gloves
numerious safety pins
more plasters
There are are couple of bits mising like tourniquet (but thats easily improvised)

Part 2 is stored in the boot of the car and contains the basics (for refill or use if needed) also contains the larger stuff like face burn pads etc.
 

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Quick clot, if your spurting blood, you might as well forget about it because the blood just pushes the or washes it away. Had it happen more than once in Iraq. Best method to use then is a tourniquet.

Butterfly bandaids are a good things as someone said. I am not a fan of Steri strips, Coban is easily accessable and is a great product. I carry some in pink, in my bag that stays in the truck. I have worked with numerous medics all who have said that mainly if it doesn't fit in their pockets they aren't not carrying it. Leave it in the truck. You can go to sites like rangerjoes and get a prepared IFAK, well you used to be able to that is what the troops down range carry on there vest. Add the meds you want and go from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Last night, I spent a few hours researching on the net and wound up getting the following kits (one for my truck and one for the wife's car, I'll take mine out of the truck when I go elk hunting).



(2) Adventure Medical Ultralight And Watertight.7 First Aid Kit = $25 each
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000GW6BJ6/ref=oss_product


I also wanted to add the following to each kit to make them a little more comprehensive for larger injuries:


(2) Celox Hemostatic Granules 15g Packet = $14.50 each
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003B76NVO/ref=oss_product


(2) The Emergency Bandage 4" (Israeli Bandage) = $9.55 each
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003HLNPTC/ref=oss_product


I got these Celox items to add to the first aid kit inside the house (two small children under 3 at the house):


CELOX First Aid Temporary Traumatic Wound Treatment 2g, 10-Pack = $31.50/box
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0032UY9BQ/ref=oss_product


CELOX Nosebleed Dressing, 5-Pads = $20/box
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0032UY9DO/ref=oss_product

My little girl gets nose bleeds all the time, just like I used to when I was little. I can always stop her nose bleeds b/c I don't freak out and can easily calm my daughter. My wife freaks out at the sight of our kid's blood and the kids then freak out b/c she freaks out. The Celox nose bleed pouches and small applicator bags are mainly for the wife b/c I think she'll need all the help she can get if I'm not there. It's also goo to have just in case.... you never know.

-ZA
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Quick clot, if your spurting blood, you might as well forget about it because the blood just pushes the or washes it away. Had it happen more than once in Iraq. Best method to use then is a tourniquet.
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Isn't that one of the reasons they make the .mil versions into a gauze now? It can be packed into a spurting hole and it will stay if you keep packing it in and then compress and cover. No loose granules/powder to flow out.

-ZA
 
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