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Bare shaft vs walk back tuning?


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Discussion Starter #1
Which do you think is the better tuning method for compound shooters with a release?

I normally just paper and then walk back tune but I have been reading more and more about bareshaft tuning and was just wondering what your guys thoughts on each are.

Is one better than the other for determing if your arrows are spined correctly?

Also I hear group tuning helps too but I don't fully understand what group tuning is. Is it where once you have paper tuned or walk back tuned that you just move your rest in very small increments and see if it groups better?

Thanks,
Glen
 

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Walk back is what I do, not much on the bare shaft tuning method;)
 

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I prefer walk back.because if you change the make of your broadhead as often as I do it gives me a better look at whats going on with the flight of that particular broadhead.not saying this is the best way.But it might depend on what type of shooting you do most.I stick more breathin animals than foam ones.
 

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When I'm trying to find the ultimate spine and arrow length for a recurve or longbow I use the bare shaft tuning method. With the compound bow and release I paper tune to ball park it, then use the walk back tuning method.
 

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Bare shaft. Remember, fletchings are correcting your arrow flight. The only true way to see how your arrows are coming off of your rest is without fletchings. You could try walk back without fletchings.
 

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i have had very good luck with bare shaft tuning, so that is how i start out and then i will do some walk back an maybe do some fine tuning if needed.
 

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I like to get it fairly close paper tuning, then group tune. I never walk back tune. Group tuning does just what it implies, tightens your groups. Most of the time I do this at 50 yards, just moving the rest slightly to see what effect it has on my groups. The rest of it really doesn't matter to me much as long as I get the best rest position to give me the best groups I can get with my setup. This is after setup and timing.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the replies. The bow I am mainly concerned about now is my outdoor target bow for fita/field shoots. That is the bow I am trying to get to tune and group the best now. Like I said I usually paper and then walk back tune, but I have also been reading that a lot of people bareshaft tune compounds. So I was just wondering if one is really better or if maybe both should be used. I think I read an article in The Tournament Archer that Dan McCarthy uses the bareshaft tuning method.
 

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Walk back is better for centreshot but can't help you with nock height.

Bareshaft will give you a very good starting point for both nock height & centreshot.

I bareshaft first then walkback followed by group tuning.
 

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Walk back is better for centreshot but can't help you with nock height.

Bareshaft will give you a very good starting point for both nock height & centreshot.

I bareshaft first then walkback followed by group tuning.
+1

bare shaft to 30-35 yards most of the time (BHFSL)
 

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I bare shaft, then once I get my shafts flying well I will check it with a walk back and broadheads.


Bare shaft tuning, to me, is the most precise tuning that you can do. Some people argue that you don't shoot bare arrows, so why tune your bow to them. Well those little vanes on the back of your arrow are there for more than just looks. They STABILIZE an arrow and can mask poor flight. If you can get bare shafts to fly well and impact the target with a nock even attitude at extended ranges (20 is extended to me with bare shafts, 30 is way out there and your form better be perfect that day) then your bow and arrow setup is tuned about as good as it possibly could be. With a FP, your fletchings are doing very little to stabilize your arrow because its not needed. If you can get great bare shaft flight, you can stabilize and steer the largest fixed heads with ease.

And in most cases, if you are starting with the correct spined shafts and your arrows are well built, once you have bare shaft tuned the walkback and broadhead check is nothing more than for your peace of mind because you normally don't need to change a thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all of the help. My next question is can I bend an x10 or some other aluminum/ carbon arrow? Because I have messed around bareshaft tuning my carbon arrows and sometimes they hit the target at a hard angle.
 

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Thanks for all of the help. My next question is can I bend an x10 or some other aluminum/ carbon arrow? Because I have messed around bareshaft tuning my carbon arrows and sometimes they hit the target at a hard angle.

OK, I'm a big proponent of bare shafting, but here are some quirks with it. First, yeah you can bend an ACC/CAA. With bare shafting so many things have to be right for it to work. Your form must be near perfect as you can impart just a little torque at the shot and see a bare shaft do funky things. Your shafts must be well built. Improperly squared shafts can cause problems, bent shafts of course can cause problems. Unless I am downright positive that my shaft is 100%, I will usually shoot 2 or 3 to make sure they are all doing the same thing.


You can run into similar problems broadhead tuning too though. I went to help a friend of mine one day and not only would his broadheads not shoot with fp's they wouldn't group. I trusted that he checked BH alignment before we started. He didn't. I spun those arrows and you could have mised cement with them.
 

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Walk back is better for centreshot but can't help you with nock height.

Bareshaft will give you a very good starting point for both nock height & centreshot.

I bareshaft first then walkback followed by group tuning.


ditto
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for all of the help guys. So it seems like a lot of people will bareshaft first and then walk back. I myself am afraid to even try bareshaft tuning one of my x10s just because of the fact of how expensive they are. The last thing I want to do is bend one of them. So do you guys using A/C type arrows don't worry if you bend one or do you use another form of tuning to get your nock height?

Thanks,
Glen
 

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I doubt I get as tuned as the other folks on here, but I simply bareshaft tune. I start at 5 feet, get bullet holes, check at 10 feet, and get bullet holes both through paper....then I do 10 yards, 15 yards, and 20 yards (sometimes) with bare shafts, if they are grouping at that point, when I switch to vanes and FP's and then broadheads, and to 10-15-20-25-30-35-40-45-50, I have never had a problem with being off left or right at certain distances.

My advice is start with paper tuning, easiest way IMO to get your vertical and center shot on or really close to on, then start close, and just start moving back, if you are hitting where you are aiming with both broadheads and field points, call it good, if not then you might need to go back to paper tuning, or try walk back.
 
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