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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am curious about what one has to do to become a "bow tech"? Is there like an armorer's course you can take to learn all about what tweaks do what to a bow? Is it all just passed around by word of mouth? Is it something you get certified in? How would I become a bow technician someday?
 

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well, it all depends on your situation. I never knew anything about this sport, but I was working hard at a retail store and was offered a job as a bow technician at a pro shop just based on my work ethic. I told them I knew nothing and they said that was fine. They would train me. So I learned everything from the other techs and managers. And then honestly just tinkering with things myself.

I feel really the best way to learn is just start working on things with supervision from someone that is knowledgeable. I mean the best archer in the world could tell you what to do till their blue in the face, but until you try things on your own, you wont learn a thing. Experimentation is key, try different things till something works.

There used to be a program where mathews would host like an archery university type of thing to learn the basics of bow tuning. I never went but I heard it was a great way to start. I'm not sure if they still do this or even how to go, prolly have to working at a mathews pro shop...
 

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Once nuts&bolts gets done with his DVD, you will have all the information you need to become your own bow technician.....If you haven't emailed him to reserve a copy, I suggest you find his thread and do it. It will be the best $25 you ever spent.....He will only bill once the DVD or Download is ready to go! He's getting very close......
 

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Some of the bow companys put on a school it is a two week crash course don't no if they still do. PSE was one of the best.Also at some of the larger bow shops had small clinics buy some of the reps if you were a shop shooter. I did some of these in the mid 90s
 

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If you do decide to become a bow tech don't take anything you are told as being 100% correct no matter who gives you the information. Confirm everything you are told by trying it for yourself and see if you get the same result. There are some great tuners on AT that give some great information but there is also some misinformation as well, only believe what you can confirm and you will do OK.
 

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I too was trained by a lead tech at a shop and am still learning. There is a school that was highly recommended to me by a rep that is one of the best techs I know. George chapman archery school in Syracuse NY. I think it's a couple weeks long but the bow companies rarely do the school anymore. They mainly do product knowledge seminars now.
 

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The best thing to do is just start tinkering with things yourself. Only way you are going to learn is just to do it. I started a year ago working on my own bow, and it was worth every mistake I made to learn how to work on my own stuff. It's so much more rewarding knowing that you did all the tuning and work yourself.

AT is a great resource on finding out how to do things. Do a search here on the forums for what you need and you will find it.
 

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Well, first thing you have to do is have your limbs explode..

Lol sorry I had to say it. I think the best way is just apply at shops if you don't know what your doing now. My buddy owns a shop and he gave a young kid, 16 or so a chance to become a tech. But my God that kid couldn't hit water if he fell out a boat. He was just impossible to teach. We called him "Jeffey" After his his last mishap screwing up a bunch of brand new arrows after he was taught dozens of times how to do it, he had to let him go. You'll be able to find a shop that'll help you out in sure. If not, save money and buy a press and a vice and many other things. That's what I did a long time ago and I couldn't be happier
 

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+1 on just diving in with DIY. Make sure to carve out a large budget for tools - the bow & arrow itself is the cheapest part of DIY. The heaviest investment is going to be in your tool set. Bow press, arrow fletcher and saw, string jig (even a DIY string jig is a big investment in time to build it), serving tools, serving, bowstring, points, inserts, feathers/vanes, all sorts of pliers, etc..... Well, you get the idea lol.

To me, having the right tool to do a particular task is absolutely paramount. I've lost count of the times where I hit a wall and have to stop working because I needed a tool. The thing to do is simply pause and go ring up Lancaster for whatever it is you need lol. And just try not to look at the credit card bill when it comes in lol....

That's starting to slow down for me, but I still here and there hit a place where I'm missing a tool for something I need done.

But it's very rewarding, you can set up your gear exactly the way you want it whenever it needs done. That's the real value of it for me.

LS
 

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Once nuts&bolts gets done with his DVD, you will have all the information you need to become your own bow technician.....If you haven't emailed him to reserve a copy, I suggest you find his thread and do it. It will be the best $25 you ever spent.....He will only bill once the DVD or Download is ready to go! He's getting very close......
x2! I learned a lot from a friend of mine in high school who's dad owned an archery shop. Then from tinkering, followed by working in a big box store as a bow tech. I work a couple of days a month at a friends small shop. So after all the years of bow hunting and working on bows I'm still learning (thanks to Archerytalk). So my advice is ask questions, read, read some more and tinker, then tinker some more. Never stop learning and don't be afraid to try something new.
 

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I'd say you really need some mechanical apptitude and enjoy tinkering. Half of the battle is recognizing situations that lead to damaged equipment. I used to work in several box stores and can tell you that every "tech" I've ever known has their own spin on how a bow should be set up. All of them have made mistakes as well... including myself. It will happen but learn from your mistakes and don't get in a hurry. These days there are so many manufacturers that it's impossible to know how to deal with everything that walks through the door. Those 2 week courses are only going to show you the basics like how to properly time a twin cam or set up a center shot... maybe how to tie in a peep and center serving which you can apply to every bow. They probably won't get into intricate details about all the cam system variations though. Understanding the limits of a bow and how to properly press them is also key. I have seen several risers bent because guys don't understand the forces applied when pressing a bow and where to safely apply that pressure. I have personally shown a lot of guys how to do the work and to be honest the best way to learn is to just do it. I used to grab bows off the rack and say... tear it all the way down and put it back together. I keep an eye open but don't get too close unless there's a question. Funny thing too is I can always tell a good tech from a bad one with one simple task... whether or not they can tie a D-loop. You'd be amazed how many so called "techs" can't even tie a D-loop properly. If a guy doesn't have the eye and attention for detail to tie a D-loop then I have little to no confidence in their abilities.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you all so much for the input. On the firearms side you have things like the American Gunsmithing Institute to learn gunsmithing, so after hearing the ineviatble "horror stories" of "bad bow techs", I wondered if there was some certification you had to have, or if any ol' schmuck could slap a sign on his shop and call himself a tech. I also took quite a liking to sniper rifles and spent several months converting a black plastic-stocked Remington 700 BDL deer rifle into a ballistic scalpel, so I'm well-tuned to the idea of how the tiniest change in a closed system imparts a change on every other aspect of performance, and am likewise a bit too much of a perfectionist and accuracy nazi, which I think is the right mindset for tweaking bows, but I could probably take it down a notch. :) I just hate thinking there's one more tiny little thing I could do to make it just one tiny little bit better...

But for me overall, it's all about the DIY. I live probably 10 miles from the nearest shop and it's a real pain to have to go up there to have some piddly work done (like pressing the bow for peeps, etc).

I got big into DIY on the traditional side, so I already have lots of tools for fletching, nocking, bow squares, serving thread and knowing how to serve, etc. My biggest things I can think of right now are restringing my bow, pressing it for peeps and such, and that sort of thing. But with restringing comes idler lean and bus cable tweaks and adding/subtracting string twists, and all the real meant and potatoes that complicate a big job with a little name.

But someday, if I become well versed and confident, it'd be nice to offer tech services to other folks out here who don't necessarily want to go to town and have their bow put in line with a week long turnaround time, but I don't necessarily want to want to make a living at it, either. Or another good example would be my buddy dropping his dead eye out of his tree and derailing it. It took all of 3 minutes to press and restring, but it had to be done in town the next day, some 18 hours later. I hate not being self-sufficient, and I hate not being able to help my friends solve simple issues like that, but alas I don't yet own a press. I'm dying to go back to Ontario bear hunting, this time with a bow and the last thing I need is to cut a string or derail the bow and not have the self sufficiency to fix it quick.

I'm putting Nuts & Bolt's DVD on my list of things for Santa to bring me this year.

For strictly DIY purposes, would a carefully made bow press be suffcient (I like the trailer jack press threads on here), or should I fork over the $425 for an EZ Green do you think?

Thanks again all for the quick replies jam packed full of gooey good knowledge! I usually lurk 99 threads for every time I have to pipe up and ask something, but when I do you guys never fail to deliver!!! I love this place. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Sorry I'm only just now getting back you all; weekend drill shot my weekend to pieces as usual. Just wanted to say thanks again to everyone for your highly informative responses and a super big thanks to cordini for suggesting I get in line for Nuts&Bolts' DVD; I'm officially on the list with the pre-order AT membership price! I can't wait to get started!! :D
 

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Sorry I'm only just now getting back you all; weekend drill shot my weekend to pieces as usual. Just wanted to say thanks again to everyone for your highly informative responses and a super big thanks to cordini for suggesting I get in line for Nuts&Bolts' DVD; I'm officially on the list with the pre-order AT membership price! I can't wait to get started!! :D
You're welcome......It's going to be nice to have the Nuts&Bolts DVD for a reference tool.
 
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