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Widewater Hunt Club
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I have both; single cams are easier to tune and draw. Double a bit faster but for this extra speed the archer pays a price. For me this little bit of speed does not make that much difference if you are a bowhunter. I'm 73 and have been bowhunting for 50 years. Have taken many animals with a bow; elk, caribou, bear, antelope, kudu, gemsbuck, Russian boars, impalas, hartabeast, javelin, wart hog, deer, jackal, feral hogs, and many turkeys. My advise to younger archers; shoot single and save your shoulders so you can enjoy archery as long as I have.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have both; single cams are easier to tune and draw. Double a bit faster but for this extra speed the archer pays a price. For me this little bit of speed does not make that much difference if you are a bowhunter. I'm 73 and have been bowhunting for 50 years. Have taken many animals with a bow; elk, caribou, bear, antelope, kudu, gemsbuck, Russian boars, impalas, hartabeast, javelin, wart hog, deer, jackal, feral hogs, and many turkeys. My advise to younger archers; shoot single and save your shoulders so you can enjoy archery as long as I have.
My first compound is a Diamond Core, single cam. It's been very accurate so far. I took off the Hostage rest, and replaced it with a Whisker Biscuit, at the advice of my bow shop. It's fairly obvious that I'm new at this, but you have to start somewhere!
 

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I have both; single cams are easier to tune and draw. Double a bit faster but for this extra speed the archer pays a price. For me this little bit of speed does not make that much difference if you are a bowhunter. I'm 73 and have been bowhunting for 50 years. Have taken many animals with a bow; elk, caribou, bear, antelope, kudu, gemsbuck, Russian boars, impalas, hartabeast, javelin, wart hog, deer, jackal, feral hogs, and many turkeys. My advise to younger archers; shoot single and save your shoulders so you can enjoy archery as long as I have.
This isn't true, a double cam can be every bit as smooth and easy to pull as a single cam. A lot of single cams are far from smooth.
 

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I have both; single cams are easier to tune and draw. Double a bit faster but for this extra speed the archer pays a price. For me this little bit of speed does not make that much difference if you are a bowhunter. I'm 73 and have been bowhunting for 50 years. Have taken many animals with a bow; elk, caribou, bear, antelope, kudu, gemsbuck, Russian boars, impalas, hartabeast, javelin, wart hog, deer, jackal, feral hogs, and many turkeys. My advise to younger archers; shoot single and save your shoulders so you can enjoy archery as long as I have.
This sounds like someone that drank too much Kool aid. Many dual cam bows draw smoother than many single cam bows. Nothing wrong with a single cam other than they really have no advantage and you do lose some performance. Single cams are also known for lateral nock travel issues. Every system has pros and cons. My favorite is probably binary cams. They are slaved together so very little worries of timing issues popping up and are smooth and fast. Only drawback is they are known for cam lean.

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I have both; single cams are easier to tune and draw. Double a bit faster but for this extra speed the archer pays a price. For me this little bit of speed does not make that much difference if you are a bowhunter. I'm 73 and have been bowhunting for 50 years. Have taken many animals with a bow; elk, caribou, bear, antelope, kudu, gemsbuck, Russian boars, impalas, hartabeast, javelin, wart hog, deer, jackal, feral hogs, and many turkeys. My advise to younger archers; shoot single and save your shoulders so you can enjoy archery as long as I have.
I agree with several of the above replies. I also am 73 yo. Have been shooting/hunting 58 years and bought my first double cam three years ago. It is much smoother and easier to draw/shoot than any of the single cams I have had in the past.
 

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As has been said, single cams require little tuning, but double cams can be the opposite.

As a beginner I would advise a single cam. Unless you have a bow press and want to learn how to tune a double cam or cam and half bow.

Tuning is important for getting good arrow flight, especially when you use fixed blade broadheads.
 

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As has been said, single cams require little tuning, but double cams can be the opposite.

As a beginner I would advise a single cam. Unless you have a bow press and want to learn how to tune a double cam or cam and half bow.

Tuning is important for getting good arrow flight, especially when you use fixed blade broadheads.
This isn't good info either! When Mathews first started making single cam bows string materials was crap. Back then a single cam was easier to keep in tune than a double cam because of strings stretching and everything coming out of whack. With the string materials of today this don't happen to be the case anymore. With a quality string today it don't matter which cam system you use when you tune the bow they stay their. I have never cared for any single cam bow myself, a single cam has always been known for a huge dump off into the valley and far from smooth in my opinion.
 

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If you buy a entry level bow of any kind the strings that come on them will be junk. Some top of the line bows don't have good strings on them. Hoyt and Mathews by far have the best factory strings of all.
 

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...Nothing wrong with a single cam other than they really have no advantage and you do lose some performance...
When Mathews first started making single cam bows string materials was crap. Back then a single cam was easier to keep in tune than a double cam because of strings stretching and everything coming out of whack. With the string materials of today this don't happen to be the case anymore. With a quality string today it don't matter which cam system you use when you tune the bow they stay their.
I agree..string material stretched a lot
 

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If you buy a entry level bow of any kind the strings that come on them will be junk. Some top of the line bows don't have good strings on them. Hoyt and Mathews by far have the best factory strings of all.
I agree, although I don't like any stock stings including the Zebra's that came on mine.
 

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single cam on the exact same bow as a double cam, the double cam is faster

higher speed is EASIER to get with a double cam bow at the same poundage

single cams are less finicky about tune USUALLY, double cams more finicky USUALLY

single cam strings are much longer and much more prone to stretch than a double cam bow, even if it does have three strings or in some cases 5

with reduced string stretch the two cam will GENERALLY stay tuned better

quality strings like vapor trail reduce that greatly on both bow types

you can not get a single cam to pull as SOFTLY as a two cam at the same speed,, the two cam is ALMOST always easier to draw( draw cycle)

if 60# is 60# for both, i will always take the two cam bow, because of the reasons above, faster, less string stretch, easier feeling (softer draw
cycle),

plus it is EASIER TO SEE if a two cam bow is out of synch and that effects flight and accuracy
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If you buy a entry level bow of any kind the strings that come on them will be junk. Some top of the line bows don't have good strings on them. Hoyt and Mathews by far have the best factory strings of all.
You may have read my other thread "bowstring breaking", where my string was breaking about 1/4" into the cam. A burr was found on the cam, and it was replaced under warranty. The bow shop employee was telling me that most factory strings don't last long, and I told him that I wanted a better one. I don't know much about strings, but the one he replaced it with had the peep secured to my position by wraps above and below the peep. I'd like to know more about the different kinds of strings/cables, and would appreciate any info.
 

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This isn't good info either! When Mathews first started making single cam bows string materials was crap. Back then a single cam was easier to keep in tune than a double cam because of strings stretching and everything coming out of whack. With the string materials of today this don't happen to be the case anymore. With a quality string today it don't matter which cam system you use when you tune the bow they stay their. I have never cared for any single cam bow myself, a single cam has always been known for a huge dump off into the valley and far from smooth in my opinion.
So you're saying a single cam bow isn't easier to tune than a cam-5. If so I totally disagree with you. In fact I absolutely know you are very wrong on that opinion. All of this is assuming you actually strive to get good arrow flight from a bow. In fact you are also wrong about all single cams being known to have a huge dump off into the valley. You posted bad information.
 

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A burr on a cam can happen on any bow and does from time to time. Factory strings and cables are mass produced, they make them on a machine as fast and cheap as possible. Custom sets like sold by many string makers on here are made by hand 1 at a time. The quality and attention to detail is a lot higher. Which in return gives you a lot better string for the money. One would think a custom string would be more expensive but they are not.
 

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So you're saying a single cam bow isn't easier to tune than a cam-5. If so I totally disagree with you. In fact I absolutely know you are very wrong on that opinion. All of this is assuming you actually strive to get good arrow flight from a bow. In fact you are also wrong about all single cams being known to have a huge dump off into the valley. You posted bad information.[/QUOTE

If single cams are so good then how come Mathews (Catch us if you can) is getting away from them?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
A burr on a cam can happen on any bow and does from time to time. Factory strings and cables are mass produced, they make them on a machine as fast and cheap as possible. Custom sets like sold by many string makers on here are made by hand 1 at a time. The quality and attention to detail is a lot higher. Which in return gives you a lot better string for the money. One would think a custom string would be more expensive but they are not.
Thanks for the info. I've looked at the 60x site, and strings are very affordable.
 
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