Archery Talk Forum banner
1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
789 Posts
depends on the bow I think,,,,, if you have a longbow or a thunderbird type of bow where the string does not really touch the limbs then the beaver balls or hush balls work great but for a deep reflex longbow or a full recurve the whiskers work better,,,,, if your bow is pretty loud now with that kind of metalic sound coming form the riser when you pluck the string (usually only from FF) take a strip of Velcro the furry side and stick that down the string grooves and that along with the wiskers is perfect OR get a mountain muffler string made :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Windwalkers' link..

...helped me a lot. I've been struggling with Dorado noise for a year and cut the rubber whiskers that my dealer tied on when I bought the bow. I never suspected that a hand-tied whisker would generate noise like that but I took it off after reading that and there was a big difference. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,372 Posts
ebay -

The best silencers are a combination of the right arrows and good tuning. Adding anything to the string should be considered a last resort. If you really think about it, all string silencers do is add weight to the string in a specific area to hopefully dampen vibration.

Don't get me wrong some bows DO need extra help, just understand what you're doing and why. For example a cracking sound on release may be due to an over spined arrow smacking the riser, rather than bow noise due to excessive vibration. Some vibration may be due to the arrow disengaging the string off center-line because of it being (acting) either under or over-spined.

These days, seems like string silencers are more of a fashion statement then a necessity. Always wondered by longbows needed string silencers???

Just my .02.

Viper1 out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,477 Posts
Bowhunters, especially experienced bowhunters, do not use string silencers to subdue or disguise smacking, cracking, crashing, explosions, etc. Bowhunters are not idiots....well...some are, and do know how to tune a bow/rig.

The best tuned bow with perfect matched arrow spine is still going to emit a degree of sound that might not make the target shooters in the other lanes jump and run, or jump the string, but animals with big ears will and do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,287 Posts
Bowhunters, especially experienced bowhunters, do not use string silencers to subdue or disguise smacking, cracking, crashing, explosions, etc. Bowhunters are not idiots....well...some are, and do know how to tune a bow/rig.

The best tuned bow with perfect matched arrow spine is still going to emit a degree of sound that might not make the target shooters in the other lanes jump and run, or jump the string, but animals with big ears will and do.
+1...but I have heard some longbows BOTH primitive and current that are amazingly quiet without silencers and really didn't need any.

Ray ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76,769 Posts
Define Quiet?

I've seen bows shot with fingers and then a release, quiet by significant amount. This taught me to be careful of my release and generally shoot for a two finger release as much as possible.

Nock versus self nock or a loose nock on the string.... Huge difference with my bows... Self nock... almost perfect... if I can keep it on the string... still working on that... Heavy arrows and a high brace height make a huge difference for me... and..... the string silencers.... Maybe they don't work but they make it quiet in my mind.... :teeth:

Aloha.... :cool: :beer:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
I've played around with fleece, yarn, and the catwhiskers string silencers, and the catwhiskers are by far and away the most effective. My only caveat is that they are heavy and will slow your arrows down by about 5-7 FPS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,798 Posts
I have a little bit of the cat whiskers left that haven't flown off.

Rubber bands seem to work pretty well, though they also seem to eventually fly off or wear out, eventually...

Haven't tried the beaver balls.

Heavier arrows seem to help a whole lot :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76,769 Posts
I've played around with fleece, yarn, and the catwhiskers string silencers, and the catwhiskers are by far and away the most effective. My only caveat is that they are heavy and will slow your arrows down by about 5-7 FPS.
7 feet per second... that is about 4.77 miles per hour... a stroll in the park with the dog speed maybe at the most... compared to the speed of sound at 1100 or so fps... well.... quiet is a small expense...

Aloha... :cool::beer:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,222 Posts
I use beaverhair because it looks "period" for the SCA shoots. I think it works well. Gets a bit ratty looking after its been in the weather a few times...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,372 Posts
Tom -

Just a few notes for the new guys:

Define Quiet?

I've seen bows shot with fingers and then a release, quiet by significant amount. This taught me to be careful of my release and generally shoot for a two finger release as much as possible.
Considering the differences in the dynamics of initial arrow flight with a finger release vs a mechanical release, it's kinda like comparing a black powder round to a high-power bullet. (A mechanical release eliminates one major cause of paradox.)

Nock versus self nock or a loose nock on the string.... Huge difference with my bows...
Ya know this keeps coming up and I keep shaking my head. I'm currently using two different brand nocks with VERY different string grabs on my Warf (and a few other bows). Except for the act of Engaging the sting, I can't tell the difference in sound or points of impact. BUT, the bows are fairly well tuned.

Self nock... almost perfect... if I can keep it on the string... still working on that...
Last time I checked, a dry fire is a little louder than the sound of an arrow leaving a string normally, with or without silencers... been there, done that.

Heavy arrows and a high brace height make a huge difference for me... and..... the string silencers....
Sure, but it's not the only or even the best route, when there are other options. Just make sure that the "heavy" arrow isn't an over-spined arrow and the high brace height is compensating for that.

Maybe they don't work but they make it quiet in my mind.... :teeth:
That I can buy. No, silencers, most anyway, do work, but they can also mask other issues that should be fairly easy to address.

One of the unfortunate things (or fortunate, depending on how you look at it) about "trad" bowhunters, is that since there are no real rules or benchmarks, any opinion is valid based on personal experience, regardless of whether the guy with the opinion understands what's actually happening or not.

One thing I've found over the years, that both "trad" guys and compound shooters have in common, is that some folks in both camps seem to think that their bows defy the laws of Physics :D

So, it's whatever floats yer boat.

Viper1 out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,477 Posts
Forget all the science! Properly tune your bow/rig so that no noise is contributable to an improper tuning and then properly install the string silencers of your choice.

Bow strings do produce a noise regardless how well the bow is tuned. String silencers cannot totally eliminate sound, but they do work to a degree, often just changing the frequency of the sound. It's a matter of which material/type works the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,477 Posts
Forget all the science! Properly tune your bow/rig so that no noise is contributable to an improper tuning and then properly install the string silencers of your choice.

Bow strings do produce a noise regardless how well the bow is tuned. String silencers cannot totally eliminate sound, but they do work to a degree, often just changing the frequency of the sound. It's a matter of which material/type works the best.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top