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Discussion Starter #1
I understand while tuning, after you have your vertical flight tuned via cables/nock point/rest/tilller, you focus on your cleaning up your left & right. But am I understanding correctly that the only want to make left & right adjustments with a binary cam bow is to adjust your rest slightly out of centershot, or to shim your cams? And if so, how far out of centershot is acceptable before having to shim? And is there any drawback to adjusting the rest out of centershot instead of shimming? Thanks
 

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If it's a bowtech & let's say it a left tare you twist the left top & bottom yokes evenly
 

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I understand while tuning, after you have your vertical flight tuned via cables/nock point/rest/tilller, you focus on your cleaning up your left & right. But am I understanding correctly that the only want to make left & right adjustments with a binary cam bow is to adjust your rest slightly out of centershot, or to shim your cams? And if so, how far out of centershot is acceptable before having to shim? And is there any drawback to adjusting the rest out of centershot instead of shimming? Thanks
My rule of thumb is 1/16" either way of centershot before I move the shims. If its recommended 13/16", then I have no problem going to either 7/8" or 3/4". Outside of that, do the shims.
 

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No there are other things to consider. Grip position, Face contact. rest contact. cable slide adjustment, perfect draw length, punching the release, even arrow spine.
 

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I hope this doesn't come across wrong, but too often we think the problem is mechanical when it is really "operator error". Seems we are always looking for that "magic" adjustment or accessory that will make things perfect. I shoot a binary cam bow and after 40 years of shooting bow and arrow, I am re-looking at my "grip". I have spent all summer trying to develop a torque-less way of "gripping" my bow in an effort to reduce stabilizer weight. It has been successful for me. I decided that too much emphasis is placed on stabilizers to offset bad form, i.e. side stabilizers and long stabilizers.
 

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I understand while tuning, after you have your vertical flight tuned via cables/nock point/rest/tilller, you focus on your cleaning up your left & right. But am I understanding correctly that the only want to make left & right adjustments with a binary cam bow is to adjust your rest slightly out of centershot, or to shim your cams? And if so, how far out of centershot is acceptable before having to shim? And is there any drawback to adjusting the rest out of centershot instead of shimming? Thanks
Factory given center shot is a starting place, not exact, but dang close. Going on 8 years with nothing but binary cams with no yokes I haven't seen the need of shimming. All of my binary cams bows have shot great...or maybe I should say "great enough for me."
My shortest with 33 1/2" ata. My longest with 41 1/2" ata.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I don't have any yokes to tune.

I am aware how the slightest grip change in pressure can have a drastic change in bare shaft flight.

Is centershot measured from where the riser bends out for the shelf? Or from the main inside face of the riser (I hope this makes sense)? Most risers are straight except where they they bend to allow room for the shelf. Is centershot measured from the main straight edge of the riser or from the face of the shelf?
 

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Drop down a spine and try it. Some of the 2-track bows like a little less spine.
 
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