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Discussion Starter #1
I'm debating about planting BioMaXX Seed or picking up Soybean seed from a local seed dealer. Just wondering if anyone has planted either for their food plots? My intentions are to plant approximately two one acre food plots which will be saved for late season hunting. I have plenty of corn and hay as I hunt in farm country USA. I just want to have some hidden standing food plots for my December hunts. Any thoughts or experiences would be greatly appreciated. Pics would also be great to see.
 

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hunter
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I have planted both, and both more than one season. Personal opinion only is that BioMaxx is an expensive way to go for food plots, as they put very little (15% tops) Roundup Ready corn seed in the mix. RR soybeans are about $36 per 50 lb bag, while RR corn might be as much as $175 or maybe more per 50 lb bag. So you can see why they scimp on the corn seed and don't put much in!
So, make your own mix with 3 bags of RR beans and one bag of RR corn from your local elevator so you have 200# of seed for about $235. This should be more seed than you need for 2 acres and you will have 25% corn! This mix can be broadcast and drug in or run over with a packer, but a grain drill is better if you have access to one.
Make certain you buy RR seed as spraying with glysophates (Roundup) is the only practical way to control weeds. And controling weeds in any crop is NOT optional!
Biomaxx at estimated $120 (or more) for a 45# bag, times the 3 bags you will need equals $360.
On a side note, I love RR beans as a food plot, and more importantly, the local deer love it. Especially right now as the local grain farmers have all their corn and beans in the bins so the deer come over to my place now.
After nine years of trying different combos, I have settled primarily on soybeans and Buck Forage Oats for my 3 acres of food plots. For all input costs involved, ease of planting and weed control, and desirability to deer, it is a hard combo to top.
I have about given up on corn because of high cost of inputs, and when you do get a good crop the deer can go thru it very quickly unless you have many acres of it.
It is apparent I can get windy about this subject, but now I get almost as much fun out of my amateur farming as I do in bowhunting the whitetails here in Ohio. Good luck next spring with this project.
 

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hunter
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Since you asked for pics, here is one from 5pm tonight 12/16. It is about 225 yards from my house window across a pond to these deer in one of my plots. Right in the center at the edge of the Buck Forage Oats and in the turnips is a shootable 8 point that has played me for the fool for the last 3 weeks! Last Fri evening he slipped in behind my treestand and winded me, and has not showed again until tonight. Now I guess it is my move again in this game. And no, there is no Ohio deer season that allows my Remington .280.

http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/attachment.php?attachmentid=685390&stc=1&d=1261009583
 

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Are you referring to

Biologic Maxximum ? If you are it is a great forge producer.It is supposed to produce 10 tonds of forage per acre.I grew it several years,it will grow to a height of three feet. They really didn't care fore it at first so I'd plant it mixed with something else.

 

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food plots

I have used biomaxx and had good success but it is pricey. cheaper and better corn to soybean ratio going through a grain store. I have also used biologic maximum and have made it my go to plot seed. Tried to make my own mix to match it but it just wasnt up to par with maximum even though it was alot cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Awesome info! I appreciate it. I'm convinced that I need to hit up the local elevator for some RR Beans. I think I will stick w/ that and leave the corn to the farmers. The Biologic Maximum is a great seed too. On the WI farm that I hunted in the past, Maximum was our staple food plot (nearly 2 acres). I appreciate everyone's input and CAN'T wait to put some beans in the ground next spring. I will probably have to use a broadcaster, but will drag to cover the seed up. I believe about 1/2" for beans, correct? Also, with RR beans, do you go through and spray Roundup 4 weeks after germination? Another question is what number fertilizer is best to use when planting beans? I've used "corn starter" in the past for my other plots but this will be my first time planting beans.
 

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hunter
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Have the acres you intend to plant ever been worked up? If not you need to mow, kill down the weeds, plow, disc and smooth prior to planting to get a nice firm seedbed just like gardening on a larger scale. If the ground is too rough the seed will go too deep and you will have poor results. A cultipacker is a great tool to finish a nice seedbed before you plant.

Do not make the rookie mistake of trying to work up your dirt too early in the season, even though you are antsy to get going. If it is too wet the dirt will just clump and lump up and you will have created more work for yourself getting the seedbed prepared.

Bagged triple 15 or triple 19 fert will work. Just try to find the best $$$ deal you can and broadcast 300 to 350 pounds per acre and then drag over the fert. Then broadcast the beans and drag over that as well. One half inch seed depth is fine but too deep is worse than too shallow. I hesitate to say, but about 60 to 70 pounds of seed per acre should be plenty. Watch the weather and watch the local real farmers to see when they are putting beans into fields where they had corn the previous year. They will be using no-till grain drills, but the timing is the same. Within a week or two prior to Memorial Day should be fine, but ask the locals. Ideally you want rain asap after planting.

Pray for rain and sunshine in the proper quantities. That is out of your control just as it is for real farmers.

Spray the entire field with properly mixed Roundup or generic glysophates approx 22 days after emergence. Try not to miss any areas, but if you do you can spot spray later with a backpack sprayer.

In general, deer will hit beanfields early summer eating tender vines and leaves. Then there will be a lull and they will be back in late November and thru December for the beans when they cannot find nutrition elsewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Some will have been tilled up but some won't. I plan on "burning" it up first w/ Roundup and then mowing w/ a brush hog. After that I have access to a 6 foot heavy duty tiller. We've found that this PTO driven tiller is the ticket to a good seed bed. I think my biggest fear is how hard could the deer hit the food plot when the plants are in their inphant stages. Thanks for the tips and will be sure to keep ya posted w/ the results next year. Any other info and experiences are greatly appreciated.
 

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hunter
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A pto driven rototiller on the back of a tractor is a great option for playing in the dirt. A little slow but you only need one pass over the field so it evens out on the work involved and fuel needed. I tried it one year but we are so rocky here I was kept busy replacing tiller shear pins. And for beans you do not really have to till as deep as you would for a good stand of corn.
Unless you have a glut of deer, they should not be able to devastate two acres when the plants are in infancy. But you would have the same problem no matter what you put in. Good luck and report back this time next year.

http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/attachment.php?attachmentid=686193&stc=1&d=1261137304
 

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