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Can I get someone to tell me the difference between left, straight and right nock receivers? I thought I had a straight receiver to go with my straight clamp. I just got a left clamp to fletch some feathers and I also ordered a left nock receiver. The two nock receivers look identical to me. Maybe someone that owns multiple nock receivers can take a picture illustrating the difference?

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There is no difference other than the orientation of the nock relative to the index vane when the fletching comes out of the jig. It made a difference back in the day when nocks were glued onto the conical taper on the shaft, but now it does not because you can just turn the nock. In other words, if you remove the nock, you cannot tell which receiver the arrow was fletched with.

If you're looking for the actual "difference" it's the rotation of the nock index inside the receiver relative to the detents on the outside of the receiver. the difference is very slight between "straight" and "left".
 

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There is no difference other than the orientation of the nock relative to the index vane when the fletching comes out of the jig. It made a difference back in the day when nocks were glued onto the conical taper on the shaft, but now it does not because you can just turn the nock. In other words, if you remove the nock, you cannot tell which receiver the arrow was fletched with.

If you're looking for the actual "difference" it's the rotation of the nock index inside the receiver relative to the detents on the outside of the receiver. the difference is very slight between "straight" and "left".
I'm fletching some 25yr old 2115's so I think I need the left receiver. If I align the receivers next to each other they look IDENTICAL. The indents appear to be in the same orientation around both receivers. I don't know if I have 2 lefts, 2 straights, or what I have. I'll try to post a pic.

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The shiny one is the new one I ordered as a left.


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I'm fletching some 25yr old 2115's so I think I need the left receiver. If I align the receivers next to each other they look IDENTICAL. The indents appear to be in the same orientation around both receivers. I don't know if I have 2 lefts, 2 straights, or what I have. I'll try to post a pic.

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Are you using glued on nocks?
 

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What does 25 yr. old 2115's have to do with the nock receiver??
 

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Are you sure your not getting confused with the clamp orientation? There is a right, left and straight clamp.
And each has a nock receiver that is supposed to go with it.

Yes nuts n bolts, they are glued on. I'm going old school. :)

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What does 25 yr. old 2115's have to do with the nock receiver??
If the nocks are glued to the taper, then it may matter as far as fletching orientation relative to the nock when they come out of the jig. If the nocks are modern nocks, then it doesn't matter which receiver is used because you can simply turn the nocks to suite.

OP, I think you have two of the same receivers, no markings on the knob?
 

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I know the optional Blitz TM nock receivers came marked left, right or straight to match the clamp. This gave you a 3 fletch out of the jig with the cock feather indexed down or up for shooting through a prong rest or over a blade. The standard receiver indexed the cock feather out at 90 degree to the riser. As nestly said all this mattered when nocks where glued on before the arrow was fletched. You could fake it by pressing the nock on real hard then fletching the arrow before gluing the nock. The problem was you ran the chance of slippage when turning the arrow to the next position and not end up with a perfect 120 degree 3 fletch. Thats why they had a variety of nock receivers to match different style rests. Today you can just turn the nock after your done so none of this really matters anymore.
 

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Use an arrow saw. Chop off the taper. Purchase Easton Unibushing for 2115 arrows, so you can use a push in style Easton G-nock.
Tapered nocks are still available... and if not, I have bins of them you're welcome to. (not sure if they're really rated for todays high energy bows though?) Also, some of the tapered shafts had a double taper/swage, so you could end up with a significantly shorter shaft by the time it's all said and done switching to bushings.

OP, you may not have what you need anyway... Straight, left, and right receivers are going to fletch index feather on the left or right (fingers or drop away) You'd need a TM straight, TM left, or TM right to fletch index vane up or down. If you want to shoot the tapered nocks, it will be cheaper to buy new nocks and install them loosely and fletch with ANY receiver then rotate them to suite, rather than changing to specific receivers. I've had my Bitz since before there were push in nocks for aluminum, and I only ever used one receiver, whether I was using tapered nocks, or push in nocks, whether I was fletching left, right, or straight, or whether I was fletching index up, or to the left. Like I said, if you can turn the nocks, one receiver (any receiver) works the same as every other.

Recently, I switched to the Zenith upgrade, and now there is only one receiver because you fletch with the nocks removed anyway.
 

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...... You could fake it by pressing the nock on real hard then fletching the arrow before gluing the nock. The problem was you ran the chance of slippage when turning the arrow to the next position and not end up with a perfect 120 degree 3 fletch. .
"back in the day", that's what we did. In fact, I didn't even glue my nocks on, you can just "twist" them on the taper and they're every bit as secure against rotation as modern push-in nocks
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If the nocks are glued to the taper, then it may matter as far as fletching orientation relative to the nock when they come out of the jig. If the nocks are modern nocks, then it doesn't matter which receiver is used because you can simply turn the nocks to suite.

OP, I think you have two of the same receivers, no markings on the knob?
Nope, no L on either one. I got a straight instead of a left. :(

I'm fletching these for shooting off the shelf with a recurve, so I do want the odd vane out. All my nocks are glued on already. Some of my old heavier shafts do have a really long taper so trimming the back off is a no go. I have plenty of old plastic nocks in my tackle box anyhow.

I went to a TM receiver in the late 90's when I got my first prong rest. Then I put on the Zenith upgrade when I started shooting Axis arrows, because they were sloppy in the standard jig and receiver. Now I'm trying to go back to the beginning and may eventually fletch some cedar shafts.


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Here is how it orients the cock vane. I assume it should be more clockwise around the shaft?


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Here is how it orients the cock vane. I assume it should be more clockwise around the shaft?
I don't remember specifically, but I suppose a "Left" receiver would put the front of the fletch on the left side of top-dead-center, and the rear of the fletch to right of top-dead-center in your pic. Close enough IMO, especially shooting off he shelf.
 

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"back in the day", that's what we did. In fact, I didn't even glue my nocks on, you can just "twist" them on the taper and they're every bit as secure against rotation as modern push-in nocks
Still doing it this way---and a tiny speck of glue will hold the nock securely enough for fletching. Then twist the nock loose and re-glue.
 

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Started shooting target arrow with just twisted nocks back in about 1970, on hunting arrows would just twist on nock to fletch & when done remove nock add glue & position to the way you wanted the fletching for the greatest
clearance to the arrow rest.
Reason for not gluing nocks was shooting single spot target & if glued could get a cracked nock & not see it but if just screwed on & got cracked nock they would fly off the arrow.
 
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