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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking about getting a recurve to play with. Coming from compound use only, do my personal specs stay the same on a recurve or do I need to adjust them? I am currently a 29" DL and 66 DW. Would I be shopping for a recurve with those stats in mind, or should I be looking for lighter weight and shorter draw?

Thanks.
 

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c -

You draw length may change, typically shorten a bit. Hard to say because compound form can vary a lot.

Regarding draw weight, think about your HOLDING weight on the compound, not your peak weight.
Think about holding your peak weight with your fingers at anchor for several seconds.
Typically your current holding weight x2 or 30# at your dl is appropriate. (assuming you actually want to learn how to shoot).

Viper1 out.
 

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Recurves are typically rated at a 28" draw. It's an industry standard. For every inch past that, you can typically add 2-3# of weight--at least on a well made bow.

66# is a lot to learn on. Not impossible, but a lot. Some folks are much stronger than others, but generally speaking most do better with a draw weight they can comfortably control. You don't want your first thought to be "I have to let go of this string!". You just have to be honest with yourself here. I rather be pulling 5# less than I'm comfortable with than 5# too much.

Your draw length will likely change as you develop your form. I wouldn't get too hung up on that, at least when starting out.

The best instruction I know of, shy of a clinic or coach, is "Masters of the Barebow, Volume 3". Two world champion archers, at least one who has coached champions. Both have proven themselves in the public arena time and time again.

No condescending attitudes, no smart aleck "do it my way or you are wrong!" remarks, no mystique or smoke and mirrors or taking you around the world to get you across the street... just easy to follow and proven instruction. It can literally take years off the learning curve.

Chad
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Viper - Chad, thanks for the responses. You definitely helped me out already.
 

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Getting started is the hardest part. The internet is, IMO, the best and worst thing to happen to our sport--anyone who can type can be an "expert". I suggest doing your homework. Someone doesn't have to be a world champion to give good advice, but if you have one person who's never done anything in the sport arguing with someone who has proven themselves in the sport...it's not a hard call to figure out which one knows what they are talking about.

Don't be afraid to experiment--everyone has their preferences, everyone has something that works best for them.
 
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