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Hey Guys,

So here's a long winded question for you. If you want to skip the explanation first, just scroll to the bold question below.

I am an avid fisherman. I wouldn't say am ultra passionate such as fishing hardcore all day, but I love to fish and go when I can. I turn 40 in a few weeks and I thought it would be a perfect time to do a fly in fishing trip with my cousin who loves fishing. But then this morning and I stopped and thought, what about getting a compound bow? Since the first 40 years of my life were defined by fishing, why not make the next 40 years about hunting too!

See, I've been thinking of getting into a compound bow for the past 3 months though I can't explain why. There is something drawing me into a compound bow (no pun intended). I could practice at the local hunting archery place 10km away, and then going bird hunting outside or in Algonquin Park (since I have my native status card). Why bird hunting? I've hunted partridge in the past and most recently geese but I've used a shotgun. I've talked to a local pro shop that thought I would be insane to bow hunt for partridge (grouse to others) but I feel it is a good dipping my toe into hunting.

Why not dear you ask? I have pets and a lot of them. I truly love animals and every time I watched a video on YouTube of a deer getting an arrow lung shot, I felt really bad about it when the hunter would pick up a head for a photo. I'm by no means coming down on any of the hunters. I totally get it because I do it with Fish. I'm the filleter on our fishing trips which means kill and fillet. But it's just something about the deer. Even the geese and ducks I felt sorry for. Not the partridge. Dunno why. Weird eh?

So this is my questions, how long does it take you as a hunter (or does it happen at all) to get over the hump of killing an animal life (that could be considered almost a pet like a deer) in a fashion where it gets hit, runs off and then dies?

Stupid question eh? This is my struggle. No sense in defining my next 40 years if I feel bad about a goose that is stuck with an arrow that flaps for a minute or two and then dies. But I really am becoming drawn into bow hunting.

Why not consider a cross bow? I have but then I was told something by an avid compound bow hunter. He said, "With a cross bow it's just like having a gun at twice the cost. You fire the arrow and that's it. With a compound bow its a process; almost a meditative state, then you release and sometimes load and draw almost immediately to repeat. The crossbow can't compare". I sort of go his point.

I do apologize for posting such a long novel. I really am torn as to what to do. I feel that if I get enough practice between now and this October (when partridge season opens) I'll be able to get some partridge and geese later on to feed my family and then maybe work my courage and inner strength to take down a deer. But it's getting over that hump.

Thanks everyone.
 

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wolfey
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I don't think you should ever get over the fact that you're taking a life. It's that respect you give to the animal that gives it meaning. If I ever don't feel that I'll quit hunting.
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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There's no need to jump in with both feet.
You'll find that most hunters that you talk to started out hunting rabbits, squirrels and other small game at a young age.
Their first kill was not a deer with a bow, but more likely a cottontail with a .22 rifle.

And, unless you have a bowhunting mentor, I would recommend doing a lot of research on a couple of subjects...
1. Archery accuracy and how to achieve it.
2. Deer anatomy and how death occurs via a sharp broadhead.

In fact, I would highly recommend that you enroll in a Bowhunter Education class. They cover all the basics and even some strategies.
Good luck
 

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I never had any issue wirh it. Always had pets and killed my first deer as a young teen. Before that it was BB guns to birds in the back yard since I was a little kid. The taking life thing has never bothered me.

Also, to me killing one with a bow is no different than with a gun.
 

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I never had any issue wirh it. Always had pets and killed my first deer as a young teen. Before that it was BB guns to birds in the back yard since I was a little kid. The taking life thing has never bothered me.

Also, to me killing one with a bow is no different than with a gun.
Exactly.
 

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wolfey
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I never had any issue wirh it. Always had pets and killed my first deer as a young teen. Before that it was BB guns to birds in the back yard since I was a little kid. The taking life thing has never bothered me.

Also, to me killing one with a bow is no different than with a gun.
I also started the same way. Killing birds with pellet guns and then squirrels and rabbits. It makes it a little easier but as I've matured I realized all life is meaningful and should only be taken if used or to eliminate nuisance animals like mice ect. I wouldn't just kill birds for fun anymore like I used to as a kid.
 

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Lots of good advice so far. I can't really add anything other than get out there and do it. When you've drawn on a deer and decide that you're not ready yet, let the arrow down and watch him walk away.

When you are ready to release the string, you'll know it.

And maybe you never will be ready, and that's fine too.
 

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0321
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I killed a few deer with guns when I was young and didn't really seem to connect the fact that I was taking life. I don't know why. When I started bow hunting though my perspective changed and I did start connecting the fact that I was killing the animals. There were a few times where I did feel some kind of remorse but what helped me over it was the fact that I started doing my own butchering and packing of the meat and making it ready to consume. I look at the deer now as a resource for me and my family to thrive on and killing them doesn't bother me. I'm a hunter and I need to eat. They are simply my prey. That's how the animal kingdom works. I make every effort to make their death as quick and humane as possible
 

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One of the first animals I killed besides a bird, was a rabbit when I was about 12 years old. I shot him with a 410 shotgun, and he didn't die right away. I didn't know what to do, so I just started patting his side, and telling him it would be alright, until he died. Then I was happy as a pig in mud, because I killed me a rabbit, and went looking for another one. Since then, I just like to kill animals. I've never harvested one, and I ain't an Indian, I don't feel a connection to a dim witted animal. I just like to kill them. Everybody is wired different. I understand the OP's dilemma. Years ago, I would have laughed at him, but I guess I've mellowed with age. Except for wanting to kill stuff.


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Well, its time to spill the beans, I'm a bowhunter. I go through the process of hunting every year. Its my passion and I love it. I also love stumping. I have never taken a deer with a bow and most likely will never, why, cause I'm not sure I want to. I still enjoy my time out there. Will that change, maybe but, It really doesn't matter. I still love the sport of bowhunting, even if the only thing I kill is a stump.
To each his own, everyone has reasons to shoot or not and all are the RIGHT reasons for them.
But dang, you still can learn allot about BowHunting here on AT, how far you take it is up to you..

Shoot target, shoot 3d, shoot stumps or get out there and just enjoy.
 

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I feel bad for all the dead bugs on my windshield. If they would just stay out of the way I wouldn't have to smash them.

I don't even like to eat bugs.

I hunt because it is part of my religion.
 

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Catch us if you can!
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One of the first animals I killed besides a bird, was a rabbit when I was about 12 years old. I shot him with a 410 shotgun, and he didn't die right away. I didn't know what to do, so I just started patting his side, and telling him it would be alright, until he died. Then I was happy as a pig in mud, because I killed me a rabbit, and went looking for another one. Since then, I just like to kill animals. I've never harvested one, and I ain't an Indian, I don't feel a connection to a dim witted animal. I just like to kill them. Everybody is wired different. I understand the OP's dilemma. Years ago, I would have laughed at him, but I guess I've mellowed with age. Except for wanting to kill stuff.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Couldn't just shoot again...? Weird.
 

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I don’t hunt for the sport I hunt for the meat
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I for one do not like to watch the animal die. I have and I get nothing out of it. I enjoy deer meat and that's why I hunt. But just for the trophy Id quit. Im not taking a life for what's on its head or what it looks like. If Im not going to eat it Im not killing it. Think of it this way. U like the taste of meat right? Someone has to kill it right? At least these animals live free not like cows and pigs that are raised to butcher. A lot are treated cruel and not allowed to be free ranged. So yes it's sad taking a life and yes U should feel remorse but at least it's being used not like being hit by a car and rotting on the side of the road
 

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Team Mongrel Rookie
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I started killing squirrels, birds and chipmunks at a very young age with my BB gun. Things just progressed from there. I've killed so many animals in my life it doesn't bother me in the least. I'm not saying it's good (or even normal)....but that's just me. I don't feel anything for the animal when I kill it.
 

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Vendor
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There's no need to jump in with both feet.
You'll find that most hunters that you talk to started out hunting rabbits, squirrels and other small game at a young age.
Their first kill was not a deer with a bow, but more likely a cottontail with a .22 rifle.

And, unless you have a bowhunting mentor, I would recommend doing a lot of research on a couple of subjects...
1. Archery accuracy and how to achieve it.
2. Deer anatomy and how death occurs via a sharp broadhead.

In fact, I would highly recommend that you enroll in a Bowhunter Education class. They cover all the basics and even some strategies.
Good luck
Well stated da. I might add that if you are looking to shoot partridge, try using a stick bow with flu flu arrows . You will be shooting at close range and need a quick release for birds.:wink:
 

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Hey Guys,

So here's a long winded question for you. If you want to skip the explanation first, just scroll to the bold question below.

I am an avid fisherman. I wouldn't say am ultra passionate such as fishing hardcore all day, but I love to fish and go when I can. I turn 40 in a few weeks and I thought it would be a perfect time to do a fly in fishing trip with my cousin who loves fishing. But then this morning and I stopped and thought, what about getting a compound bow? Since the first 40 years of my life were defined by fishing, why not make the next 40 years about hunting too!

See, I've been thinking of getting into a compound bow for the past 3 months though I can't explain why. There is something drawing me into a compound bow (no pun intended). I could practice at the local hunting archery place 10km away, and then going bird hunting outside or in Algonquin Park (since I have my native status card). Why bird hunting? I've hunted partridge in the past and most recently geese but I've used a shotgun. I've talked to a local pro shop that thought I would be insane to bow hunt for partridge (grouse to others) but I feel it is a good dipping my toe into hunting.

Why not dear you ask? I have pets and a lot of them. I truly love animals and every time I watched a video on YouTube of a deer getting an arrow lung shot, I felt really bad about it when the hunter would pick up a head for a photo. I'm by no means coming down on any of the hunters. I totally get it because I do it with Fish. I'm the filleter on our fishing trips which means kill and fillet. But it's just something about the deer. Even the geese and ducks I felt sorry for. Not the partridge. Dunno why. Weird eh?

So this is my questions, how long does it take you as a hunter (or does it happen at all) to get over the hump of killing an animal life (that could be considered almost a pet like a deer) in a fashion where it gets hit, runs off and then dies?

Stupid question eh? This is my struggle. No sense in defining my next 40 years if I feel bad about a goose that is stuck with an arrow that flaps for a minute or two and then dies. But I really am becoming drawn into bow hunting.

Why not consider a cross bow? I have but then I was told something by an avid compound bow hunter. He said, "With a cross bow it's just like having a gun at twice the cost. You fire the arrow and that's it. With a compound bow its a process; almost a meditative state, then you release and sometimes load and draw almost immediately to repeat. The crossbow can't compare". I sort of go his point.

I do apologize for posting such a long novel. I really am torn as to what to do. I feel that if I get enough practice between now and this October (when partridge season opens) I'll be able to get some partridge and geese later on to feed my family and then maybe work my courage and inner strength to take down a deer. But it's getting over that hump.

Thanks everyone.
I agree with what others have said. You never truly get over it, maybe a little numb to it but out of respect you need to know you are taking an animals life. Where I draw the line is if you do not intend on eating the animal. Believe me, I know some people who hunt who do not eat the animal and I think that is 100% wrong but at least they do give the meat away and do not let it rot. As far as bow hunting is concerned...if you make a good placed shot and use very sharp broadheads, the animal is put down much more quickly than you think. In fact all of my "well placed" shots, the deer died in under a minute. I did have two bad shots so far. One was due to inexperience and I did not know my limits. The other due to hitting a tree branch. Anyways, I have also seen a deer live for almost 5 minutes double lung shot with a 3006. So really, is one way more humane than the other? I do not think so, just as long as you know your weapons limits and you make great effort through practice to make a good shot. Getting back to the original question of taking an animals life...are you a vegetarian? If so, then you may never get over it. If not, then what is the difference between you harvesting the animal or a farm? At least the animal you are harvesting is out in the wild and had likely had a better quality of life.
 

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Treetop Assassins
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Maybe the biggest reason why I haven't gun hunted in at least 15 years and only archery hunt now is because of the wildlife activity you get to see. I remember just as vividly the water pouring out of a bear's mouth as he drank from a creek five feet from the base of my tree as I do some of my deer kills. The stealthy/solo aspect of bowhunting affords you the opportunity to see wildlife mostly in their natural state.

Also, as some others have stated, I have a moment of remorse every single time I've killed a deer. That said, I get over it quickly when I pay it the respect it deserves and think about every single piece of meat it will provide for my family and I. In this day and age, I also like knowing where my meat is coming from.

And Timmy Big Time raises an excellent point. Nature can be spectacularly cruel whether it's the weak starving to death or a coyote ripping out a deer's intestines while its still alive. Now, I don't hunt to save a deer from a different kind of death, but these animals are not pets and face a struggle every single day of their lives. If you are putting them in the same group as a golden retriever or house cat that has no predators, gets fed every day and lives in a climate-controlled environment, that is misaligned thinking.
 

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a couple of things to consider as you try to come to terms with hunting...

there is a big disconnect between people and the food they put on their plates now. people don't associate the meat they buy in a grocery store with an actual animal. it's just another product to them like pasta. unless you're specifically looking for it, the meat you're buying comes from an animal that spends its short life living in a small confined space, being fed hormones to make it grow as fast as possible, standing in it's own excrement, and waiting to die solely for the purpose of consumption. contrast that with the life a deer lives and the benefits of the healthy, lean, organic meat they provide to us.

also think about how animals in the wild die. it's not from old age. predation, starvation, disease, hit by a car, etc. killing one with a bow doesn't seem so savage.

another big thing that drives me is the personal satisfaction i get from getting outside and relying on myself to provide. every cord of wood i cut, chicken i raise, vegetable i pull from the ground, or deer i kill is another step i take away from relying on a system outside my control to provide the basic things i need in life.
 
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