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Discussion Starter #1
I ordered a new set of limbs for my 09 Sentinel and had them installed. After running a few shots with it, I noticed the spacing around the bearings was slightly different on each end....which led me to believe the axle screws are not in to where they need to be.

My dealers answer was "just snug it up"....which made me ask, "how much is snug?" This left me a bit uneasy with his answer, and he did not know what the proper method is.

I was right there with him when swapping the limbs and Im pretty familiar with the setup. I noticed he was able to tighten them in far enough to squeeze on the limbs, and the cam doesn't freewheel as easy. Im guessing you you dont want to pinch on the cam, but I would also think the button head screws should bottom on the axle, not the limb.

Does anyone know the correct assembly method?
 

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I ordered a new set of limbs for my 09 Sentinel and had them installed. After running a few shots with it, I noticed the spacing around the bearings was slightly different on each end....which led me to believe the axle screws are not in to where they need to be.

My dealers answer was "just snug it up"....which made me ask, "how much is snug?" This left me a bit uneasy with his answer, and he did not know what the proper method is.

I was right there with him when swapping the limbs and Im pretty familiar with the setup. I noticed he was able to tighten them in far enough to squeeze on the limbs, and the cam doesn't freewheel as easy. Im guessing you you dont want to pinch on the cam, but I would also think the button head screws should bottom on the axle, not the limb.

Does anyone know the correct assembly method?
This was the cause for some confusion early on. What I do is this....

Press the bow and remove string and cables. rotate the cams. 'Snug' these up so that your limb tips hit the outer race of the bearing, but not so thight that it inhibits the cam rotation. You should also use blue loctite to keep these where you set them.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks....thats what my fallback plan was if I couldn't get a confident answer.

I remember someone mentioned about buying bearing tools for assy/removal.
Is there any way possible to press the bearings in to the perfect depth, that would allow you to completely bottom the screws (and still have no L/R freeplay and a cam that is uninhibited)?....or are the bearing races already bottomed?
Or am I just overthinking this one. I know you did a lot of cam changes, so I trust this method works just fine :wink:
 

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Thanks....thats what my fallback plan was if I couldn't get a confident answer.

I remember someone mentioned about buying bearing tools for assy/removal.
Is there any way possible to press the bearings in to the perfect depth, that would allow you to completely bottom the screws (and still have no L/R freeplay and a cam that is uninhibited)?....or are the bearing races already bottomed?
Or am I just overthinking this one. I know you did a lot of cam changes, so I trust this method works just fine :wink:
After more testing I might have a shim kit available for these that will adress this issue. The problem is this. Measure the barrel width where the limbs attach to the riser, then measure the limb pivot width, then measure the width of the cam. The pivot is woder than the ends and causes some undo stress in my opinion. the Shims make everything within a few ten thousandths and it aligns like it should. You still need to not tighten the axle screws too much but when you put the bow together everything jus tlines up.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Glad I'm not the only one getting too anal here.
I think the design plan is good, but they left too much room for error in the stackup tolerances for all the little piece-parts.

I agree....probably wont see any change in performance, but can eliminate unnecessary stresses.

The process and consistency in which they press the bushing in the limbs is probably the biggest contributor to the variation in all the bows. Get them consistent, and you'd probably be working with decent tolerances of the machined parts.

Have you ever tried cleaning up the bushings?....say to be flush with the limbs? Ive seen some bushings that protrude up to two decimal places difference with other limbs.
Im glad we're having this conversation, because I may start there and see where it gets me.
 
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Axle Screws Bowtech

I have to disagree with TAP (no offense TAP) on this one and here is why. I own the captain and snugged down those beautiful little screws and one day, when I was shooting of course, I released the string and it went limp. Now, I ask you, have you ever seen a middle aged man's jaw drop and then work as calmly and fast as he could trying to reattach the release to the string and then go back to full draw before the cams decide to release? Picture a man on his knees with a fully drawn bow that will not release trying to figure out whether to pray or yell for help. Now, after you are finished howling, I called bowtech to get the answer for this question...should I snug down the screws or should I leave the little buggers alone? Seems a few people had a different impression of what to do but Nick set us straight and told us to leave them alone as the way they come is the way they should be. And, it seems I was not the only one on AT that thought this way. I recommend you leave them alone and do not snug them down. Needless to say I have never had that problem again for if I do the neighbors are in for another round of the sweetest, mouthwatering, I will be able to expressively get out of my mouth.
 

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I have to disagree with TAP (no offense TAP) on this one and here is why. I own the captain and snugged down those beautiful little screws and one day, when I was shooting of course, I released the string and it went limp. Now, I ask you, have you ever seen a middle aged man's jaw drop and then work as calmly and fast as he could trying to reattach the release to the string and then go back to full draw before the cams decide to release? Picture a man on his knees with a fully drawn bow that will not release trying to figure out whether to pray or yell for help. Now, after you are finished howling, I called bowtech to get the answer for this question...should I snug down the screws or should I leave the little buggers alone? Seems a few people had a different impression of what to do but Nick set us straight and told us to leave them alone as the way they come is the way they should be. And, it seems I was not the only one on AT that thought this way. I recommend you leave them alone and do not snug them down. Needless to say I have never had that problem again for if I do the neighbors are in for another round of the sweetest, mouthwatering, I will be able to expressively get out of my mouth.
No offense taken, but what you did was WRONG! If you read what I wrote the only POSITIVE way to do this right is to press the bow, take the cables and string off, and tighten with loctite so the cam spins freely when done.

What YOU did was tighten them so much that you had no way of knowing that it would take more than your letoff weight for them to spin freely....basically you locked them so tight that they required more than 12-18 pounds to spin them! What did you use a 3 foot long allen wrench! :O LOL!

If they get too loose they allow the limbs to seperate from the cams and have a slide space....that aint good either! (Thats what the shim kit I am testing is for)
 
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Torquage

No offense taken, but what you did was WRONG! If you read what I wrote the only POSITIVE way to do this right is to press the bow, take the cables and string off, and tighten with loctite so the cam spins freely when done.

What YOU did was tighten them so much that you had no way of knowing that it would take more than your letoff weight for them to spin freely....basically you locked them so tight that they required more than 12-18 pounds to spin them! What did you use a 3 foot long allen wrench! :O LOL!

If they get too loose they allow the limbs to seperate from the cams and have a slide space....that aint good either! (Thats what the shim kit I am testing is for)
I only used the crowbar that allowed the maximum allowable torquage! By snugging them down I did not mean to the max. What you have said holds a lot of truth; however, I am relaying what the manufacturer has stated when questioned about the proper way to deal with those little nuggets. I think you assumed that I "wrenched" down as hard as I could and that is incorrect. But, so be it, we will live through another problem. I only hope the correct answer has been given...whether it be from you or me matters not. Cheers!
 
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