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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Realm SR6 that i just installed new strings and cables on. I have the limb bolts all the way turned in and have bow set at 32 1/16" ATA and a 6" brace height. The string is running in the center of the cam timing dots at rest. I ordered a LCA draw board for my press and it will be here tomorrow to check cam timing at full draw. The bow is a 60Lb right hand model. I have a question about yoke tuning this bow. I have to twist the top and bottom right side yokes about 10-12 times each and only have like 2 twist on the left side yokes to get cam lean vertical. I have tried to switch cable loops to opposite side of yoke and see if it would make a difference. I still have to put about the same amount of twist on the right side yoke to get cam lean vertical. Is this normal for this bow or might i have a issue somewhere else that i'm overlooking. Thanks
 

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Socket Man
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I don't count the total number of twists that it takes to get them vertical in the setup portion of tuning but yeah you do have to do a good bit of twisting to get it there most of the time.

As far as the other side, I do like to have a few twists in it just in case I want to take out a twist during tuning. If it has no twists at all then you can't take any out so I like to put in a few and then add more to the other side to get it back to vertical no cam lean.
 

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Socket Man
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Also, a lot of guys when they are doing their half twists always put in a half on one side and take out a half on the other yoke. I do not do this, I only add or subtract half twists to control cam lean with one of the yokes and I pay attention to the one that has the most twists and make my decisions.

With a bowtech the cool thing is that you want the top cam lean to match the bottom cam lean so when I need to do a half twist on the right side or left side I do both the top and bottom cam at the same time and make sure that they always end up with the same amount of lean.
 

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Socket Man
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When you do the cam sync I would suggest to do it with the non yoke end, when you twist the non yoke end it has a bigger effect on the cam sync then doing the half twists on the yokes. So if you get the cams synced almost perfect but they still have a tiny amount then doing a half twist on the two yokes is a more micro adjust and will have a smaller effect closing the deal on cam sync.
 

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Socket Man
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I have a full bowtech tuning article on my website, I became a yoke tuner back when Baldyhunter wrote his famous "Destroyer 350 tuning thread". I had never understood yoke tuning until I read that thread that came out almost 10 years ago. Since then yoke tuning has became the go to method for tuning if yokes are present and it took me a few years to master it but then I wrote my article.

I am still competing with my old bowtech specialist, it is basically the bow I learned how to yoke tune with because I shoot it daily all year round. I will say that the order that you do things with a bowtech is beyond important. In 2017 after shooting my specialist for 7 years I had put on a new string set and had a afternoon to tune it at my buddies house and if I hadn't trusted my specialist as being a awesome bow I would have thrown it in the trash because it had a 1.5 inch high left tear that simply would not change no matter what I did to the bow.

That experience right there taught me the importance of the order that you need to do things. Why? Because after being pizzed I took a step back and told myself that I was being lazy and I needed to just reset the bow back to the beginning and then go through the process correctly instead of trying to just wing it. It took less than 5 minutes to rest the bow correctly to the starting point and then another 15 minutes and I was shooting bullet holes at 20 yards just like that old specialist always did.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have a full bowtech tuning article on my website, I became a yoke tuner back when Baldyhunter wrote his famous "Destroyer 350 tuning thread". I had never understood yoke tuning until I read that thread that came out almost 10 years ago. Since then yoke tuning has became the go to method for tuning if yokes are present and it took me a few years to master it but then I wrote my article.

I am still competing with my old bowtech specialist, it is basically the bow I learned how to yoke tune with because I shoot it daily all year round. I will say that the order that you do things with a bowtech is beyond important. In 2017 after shooting my specialist for 7 years I had put on a new string set and had a afternoon to tune it at my buddies house and if I hadn't trusted my specialist as being a awesome bow I would have thrown it in the trash because it had a 1.5 inch high left tear that simply would not change no matter what I did to the bow.

That experience right there taught me the importance of the order that you need to do things. Why? Because after being pizzed I took a step back and told myself that I was being lazy and I needed to just reset the bow back to the beginning and then go through the process correctly instead of trying to just wing it. It took less than 5 minutes to rest the bow correctly to the starting point and then another 15 minutes and I was shooting bullet holes at 20 yards just like that old specialist always did.
Where can i find that article you wrote? i'm interested in reading it.
 

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Socket Man
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It is on my website, I will copy and paste it here but it is a little to big to do in one so I have to split it up and get rid of some of the intro.
 

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Socket Man
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MY COMPETITION BOW TUNING METHOD:
First is a outline of the sequence of steps:

Setup bow to factory specs along with timing , cam sync, draw length, poundage, the rest set to center shot, and the d-loop eye balled to level.
Finding the d-loop sweetspot with a bare shaft.
Paper tuning the bow with a bare shaft out to 20 yards.
Here it is, my bow tuning method and thoughts on tuning. I have had some interesting things happen over the years and over time I have let them guide me into these tuning thoughts and methods.
 

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Socket Man
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INITIAL SETUP OF A BOW RIGHT OUT OF THE BOX:

I like to take it out and get a rest on the bow and shoot the dang thing to feel it and get some shots into the string, getting the rest on the bow with full range of motion on the rest and centered on the shelf and bolt on your sight. When you put on the d-loop don’t tighten it down tight because we will be moving it soon. I like to wait and install the peep once I have the bow tuned so that if I have to move the d-loop I don’t have to mess with the peep.

Now I set the draw weight to my personal setting and the draw length and I put it in the draw board and start getting rid of cam lean at full draw and then I cam sync it and check the timing over and over until all three of these things are perfect and I also check the factory specs. Once I have factory specs and cam sync along with no cam lean at rest I then install my torque indicator. This process of setting up a bow is a hour worth of effort and it is a balancing act that needs you to go back and check things because setting them one time isn’t good enough because by getting something else spot on can affect something you already addressed. So spend your hour getting the balancing act just right and a bow ready to tune the arrow flight.
 

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Socket Man
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THE D-LOOP SWEETSPOT:

Now you are going to go over to the paper tuner and shoot your bare shaft through the paper and move the d-loop up and down the string until you find the spot on the string where you get the best tears, they won’t be perfect but they will be better than anywhere else and you will get rid of all vertical tear problems here . Most of the time it is either level to the rest or slightly higher, I can shoot any spine from 400 all the way to 150 spine arrows out of my bows no questions asked with any poundage because I find the sweetspot for the d-loop and most people don’t. Secondly as you move the d-loop and get rid of the vertical tears you must check the cam sync of your bow in the draw board because as you move the d-loop it changes how the cams rotate and many times you will loose your cam sync. Just remember that the bow is a balancing act and working on one area will affect others so by checking things such as cam sync as you progress you can keep things in check.

Paper tuning the final product:

Remember that all of the paper tuning that I do is done with a bare shaft only when I am producing my perfect arrow flight during this process and the fletched arrow is only used to verify that I am not getting any fletching contact. So I go to 6 feet and I begin shooting through the paper and I am going to shoot a few arrows and look at the tears and my only focus right now is my shot execution, during this phase I have already gotten rid of the vertical tears and right now I am working on my shot execution so it is a perfect time to turn the nock on my bare shaft and see if turning the nock can clean up some of the remaining tear. With bare shaft tuning I am either perfect with my shooting or it is a waste of time so right now I shoot these few arrows and mentally get myself spot on SMOOTH. Right now the rest is centered on the shelf and I have found the d-loop sweet spot where my vertical tears are really good but there will be a right or left tear. I am now ready to twist the yoke on the side of the tear that i am seeing, so on a hoyt that only has a upper yoke I only twist the right side when there is a right tear and on a bowtech I do the right side of the yoke on both the upper and lower cam on a right tear. I only do one or two half twists each time and I then look at the tears to make sure they are responding to the twists and once I get bullet holes at 6 feet then I move on to 10 feet and repeat and I keep moving back until I am shooting bullet holes at 20 yards with my bare shafts. Now during this process of yoke tuning you must check the cam sync and be prepared to do a half twist on the cable and keep the can sync perfect, there is nothing worse than spending a good 30 minutes or more getting really good arrow flight and then find out that the bow is no longer cam synced and having to start over. Twisting the yokes can and does have a effect on the overall bow so putting the bow in a draw board and keeping on top of your cam sync is a big deal. During the yoke tuning as you work your way back to 15 feet and then 20 feet and then 15 yards you are going to possibly have a vertical tear show back up and the moment that it does show up you need to address it immediately and move the d-loop and correct it and then check the cam sync. Once it is corrected you then focus back on the yoke tuning. When you get back to the 18 to 20 yard distance every little twist or movement of the d-loop must be done minimally because at 20 yards everything is amplified and will make drastic changes. In fact on a bowtech with yokes above and below I will choose one yoke to twist to reduce the effects by putting a arrow on the cam and picking the cam that has slightly different lean than the other one and I put the half twist into the cam that needs to catch up to the other one just a little. On a hybrid cam system you only have yokes on top so it is a easier decision to make.
 

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Socket Man
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Now with a bow such as a hoyt with a hybrid cam where there are no yokes on the bottom I do it just the way I described above but if the bow doesn’t respond with a decent amount of cam lean with the yoke tuning then I put the top cam back to neutral and I move the cam on the bottom or the top cam by moving the spacers around and then do the process again because that is the only way to control the cam lean on the bottom. This is called cam shimming. With a hybrid system you have to keep in mind that it is possible to get awesome arrow flight with bad cam lean up top, I have seen this more than once and it does suck to have to start over but in the end it produces a much better setup, twist the yokes so the top cam has no cam lean and then shim over the bottom cam in the direction that the bad tears cam from and then yoke tune the top cam again. Usually within a few half twists you are done. Since all of the yoke tuning is done with the top cam I prefer to shim over the bottom cam if it is going to help the bottom cam have less cam lean. If the bottom cam is already very good with no cam lean I will leave it alone and shim over the top cam. If the bottom cam when moved in the direction of the bad tear would produce worse cam lean for the bottom cam then I would not move it and just shim over the top cam and then proceed on with the yoke tuning. Every time you decide to shim you need to reset the top cam to zero cam lean so that you are starting fresh.

With a Elite bow you have no yokes so you follow the same process but when it is time to yoke tune you simply shim the top and bottom cams in the direction of the bad tear, this is more time consuming but has the same effect as yoke tuning,

The last thing that I use from time to time when I just find myself not able to make a half twist in the system without drastic changes is to adjust the cable rod, this can be a life saver in the end because slight changes in it can clean up something very slightly and give you a perfect setting. On a bowtech it is a flex rod and on other bows the cable rod is solid but may have the ability to be rotated a little and give you the help that you need, this is only a fine tune thing and I don't mess with it until I have came to the final stages.

See ya.

Socket Man
 

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Socket Man
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I went ahead and put the whole thing and just broke it into pieces but I got all of them on here before anyone responded, it has been written hundreds of times by me and changed over and over until it became this version. Overall the only thing I am considering changing is the D-loop sweetspot, I still really believe that locking down the arrow rest and never moving it from my optimal position is the best option but overall I think it is more of a personal decision to move the arrow rest up or down a little as a viable option that I could add to the article.

For example, I have not shot my bowtech specialist for right at a year because I shot a ct9 prime this last season. But I have decided to work on draw length and go longer so the specialist has rotating mods and the prime doesn't. So I went from 29.25 all the way to 30.5 and this gave me a low tear. I had my nock sets and d-loop already on the bow from a year ago so I got lucky that my arrow was on the upper half of the berger hole, so I decided to just move the hamskea hybrid pro down until I cleaned up the low tear and when I got even with the lower part of the berger hole I got my bullet holes. So I was lucky and didn't have to move the nock sets and my arrow ended up being perfectly aligned with the berger hole which is a good location anyway.
 
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