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Discussion Starter #1
I think i've got a great plan for a new broadhead. Do any of you know what you have to have or who to contact to try to get something like that on the market?
 

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Definitely do that. I still remember the gentleman who was on here showing his design for a broadhead and boom not even a year later I seen it on the NAP website labeled the Killzone. That my friends is a true story. Oh yeah, the guy admits that he doesn't think they stole it, but they contacted him to make him an offer to buy the rights to it and when he turned them down they contacted him again at a later date and said that they already had the patents for the same exact design.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok. Thanks. I have an idea but have not actually made it yet. If i can get it made i think many mechanical head shooters are going to love it. That's if it works properly but i'm positive it will. I don't have the equipment to make such small pieces and thinking maybe making it on a larger scale first would be good just for the concept.
 

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If I were you I wouldn't say a thing about it on here and definetly don't post pics of drawings or ideas until you get a patent on your idea .. Patents are expensive also .. And to get started you have to come up with drawings and sit down with a machinist (after getting the patent ) to build a proto type ... Test said prototype and see if you can bring it to fruition
 

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You can file for the patent yourself its not that hard go to the gov patent site and download the forms.
You will need a detailed blueprint of you idea. Size shape measurements material used and complete blueprint like a state and a product description.
Send it in along with the fee. Send it certified mail The minute your mail hits the mail box your idea is patented until the patent office gives you a rejection notice or follows up needing more information. Its really that simple just follow the instruction on the forms you down load.
http://www.uspto.gov/
 

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Your idea is NOT patented once it hits the mail box. You have nothing until the patent grants which can take years and lots of money. All you did by dropping it in the mail is establish a date of possible conception (if you kept notes during your initial thought process this would be the DoC) and with the new patent laws that went into effect on March 15th, 2013 that doesn't mean a whole lot. Used to be first to invent but it is now first to file so even if you can prove you came up with the idea first, it doesn't mean a thing if you did not file first. If you filed a provisional, it gives you a year to develop or perfect your concept and then you convert to non provisional and the real process starts. Provisional filings are like place holders until you figure out is it really works and is worth pursuing. You can not claim anything is "Patented" until that certificate comes through for grant. If you have a provisional filed you can claim "Patent Pending" but you have no right to chase off infringers until you have that grant. I do this for a living and I strongly suggest NOT doing the paper work yourself unless you truly want to have a weak, unenforceable patent and you have money to burn. Go to a Patent attorney, get it done right, have non disclosure agreements signed by anyone working on the concept and possibly you will have an income generator someday. Or, sell the bejesus out of it, as fast as you can, and pocket the money directly as a short term project. By all means, DON"T talk about it on here!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wow. Didn't realize how complicated this all could be. Like i said it's just in the idea stage. Fairly well worked out in my head but that's far from a functional and finished product. Thanks for the input. Sounds like you really have to watch out for people. Wish it weren't that way but that's what money creates for all of us right.
 

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Wow. Didn't realize how complicated this all could be. Like i said it's just in the idea stage. Fairly well worked out in my head but that's far from a functional and finished product. Thanks for the input. Sounds like you really have to watch out for people. Wish it weren't that way but that's what money creates for all of us right.
Yup keep everything to yourself until its patent ... Or disclosure agreements
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Gettin much closer on this. I work, hunt, and fish too much (for the wife), so i haven't dedicated much time to this. Two blade is the ony way it'll work so it will disappoint some but other than that, i cant wait to have it out there.
 

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I'd get a good friend, father, brother or someone to go in with you and invest in the idea. Patent's are high. When I came up with the single cam idea, I couldn't afford a patent so I talked to Matthews about it. A year later, the Solocam was in every archer's hands. I didn't get a dime.




Just kidding. Do try to get someone you can trust to invest with you.
 

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Patents are only as good as the lawyer you have cashing down violators of it and enforcing it. Personally I would just hit the market get established as the first and best make what you can while you can if it were me.
 

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not easy to get the ball rolling,

ive had some really amazing ideas drawn up for quite a few years,but not enough cash to get everything started.


and dont want to talk too much about them for fear of a company getting wind and running with my ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'm not completely sure how to ask this question. If a broadhead incorporates some parts of others (which they all do, blades, tip, etc.) how much different must something be to patent or not infringe on a patent. Probably best suited for a patent lawyer but ya never know who's on here. I'm sure We've got some from just about every walk of life.
 

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My brother had a great idea , developed and tested it. Then he got a patent . 4 years later and a lot of cash involved the patent was his for the enjoyment.
Problem is that a very big company saw the product, made minor modifications, got a patent too but in a very short time. And of course flooded the market.

So i guess a patent is just a big waste of time if you do not have the cash to market the idea in a great scale.
To add to the problem you only get protection on certain countries.

So if someone offers you a lot of cash for the idea I guess it would be good to take it and enjoy the income.
 

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I was told by an inventor a long time ago, a patent is only as good as the money behind it. The best thing to do is make and sell as many as you can before someone else does. Screw the patent if you don't have the money to back it up. It costs way more to fight someone over a patent infringement than it does to just build and market your idea and chances are that you won't make enough to cover the attorney fees.
 

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I was told by an inventor a long time ago, a patent is only as good as the money behind it. The best thing to do is make and sell as many as you can before someone else does. Screw the patent if you don't have the money to back it up. It costs way more to fight someone over a patent infringement than it does to just build and market your idea and chances are that you won't make enough to cover the attorney fees.
This really depends on what type of item it is. If it's simple and easy to manufacture with a relatively small market then this is definitely the way to go. If it requires a large investment and equipment and you'll be marketing to a large market then a Patent can be incredibly useful. As far as large companies making minor changes to the product and steeling your idea this is an indication that you had a poorly worded patent. A well written patent tends to minimize this type of assault. Having a Patent Lawyer is extremely helpful in ensuring an enforceable patent. Yes the patent is for litigation. If you see anyone trying to steel your idea and you don't make an effort to stop them, then your patent becomes useless. You must protect it from all infringers not just the big ones. This is why complicated large production runs and designs that are likely to grab large market shares and require significant resources to build are where Patents are critical. Things like bow presses and other small market items tend not to return enough profit for a reasonable return on investment. In these cases it's real hard to justify a patent. My guess is that a patent for a broadhead design from a personal inverter standpoint is likely not a good investment. It would really need to be unique and preform a lot better than it's competition to significantly grab enough market share to pay for the patent overhead. I'm sure your thought was hey this is a pretty cool idea I could patent this and make some money, but I doubt that would be the reality of the situation. It's just real hard to make a buck from an idea alone. It's a bit cheaper for larger companies to handle use patents because they have Lawyers and manufacturing bandwidth ready to take advantage of the patent and they are also prepared to deal with infringers. However if the idea is unique enough and the market is large enough and you are willing to take the financial risk then yes a patent is a worthwhile tool.
 
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