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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
alright guys heres a tough one. i have a truball sweet spot II three finger and what will happen is i will get it back click the safety off aim and then start my back tension and then unconsiously i will just really quickly rotate it and it will go off. its gotten to where im shooting it like a trigger. im thinking if i use a crisp trigger it would be easier back tension and if i use a pull tension like an attraction it will be almost foolproof in practice and then i can switch to trigger mode for hunting or something. any ideas, help or input would be very greatly appreciated.
 

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Are you shooting " AT " something??? Remove the sight, shoot blind, or aim at a blank target and concentrate on the execution of the release instead of aiming to.
 

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I shoot an evolution for practice and a sensation for 3-D that way i practice back tension with the evo, but can comand the shot when I need to with the sensation.
 

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I was doing that with my first BT release, and it really turned into a bad habit. I've switched to the Carter Evolution+ and love it. It doesn't have the half-moon cam my other BT release did, so in order for me to get my bow to go off... I have to execute proper BT. :D
 

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get rid of the clicker because it's telling you to when to hit the throttle!
go with a standard hinge release and just pull through the shot! aim aim aim that's all you should be doing. go through the shot routine in your head everytime you shoot an arrow, just let the shot go off, don't worry about the results. if you execute properly the end result will be a good shot!
 

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I concur that some blind bale shooting would do wonders for you. Many people believe that when shooting a hinge that you can't "punch" it. To tell the truth some of the worst "punchers" I've seen where shooting back tension and either slam their rhomboids together (this is what I tend to resort to now and then) or do the quick rotation like you are describing.
 

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alright guys heres a tough one. i have a truball sweet spot II three finger and what will happen is i will get it back click the safety off aim and then start my back tension and then unconsiously i will just really quickly rotate it and it will go off. its gotten to where im shooting it like a trigger. im thinking if i use a crisp trigger it would be easier back tension and if i use a pull tension like an attraction it will be almost foolproof in practice and then i can switch to trigger mode for hunting or something. any ideas, help or input would be very greatly appreciated.
Im doing the exact same thing with the exact same release! I think the only thing that will truly help us is to use enough self control to not let ourselves "punch" the release. I do know that there is a index style release that will not allow you to punch it but I dont know the name of it. I may need to look into finding one of those if I cant get control of my release.
 

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All releases can be punched - no release is a cure all for it. I've seen people who have, ummm, coaches that do not seem to understand this and can not figure out why they aren't improving with their new shiny Evolution or other such release. It is just that some releases are easy to punch, others not so much.

You have to learn to not anticipate the release, if you can do this then shooting a finger release is no issue (though most mortal can't do this, people like Dietmar Trillus most certainly can). Further most of us can do this nearly effortlessly when blind bailing but the transition to real shooting is a tough one.

There are no simple answers - if you truly want to fix it then there is going to have to be some personal controls. Generally speaking if you break the sequence by much at all you tend to break it all together - that is the idea of "seeing if I fixed it" will generally undo everything you have done. Further me being some random guy from the internet - why believe me?

While, again, no real reason to believe me I've been there, done that. Nor am I the only one. What I describe below is standard coaching, it is by no means my own ideas on the matter and after not believing it I eventually went that way and found it works. You can choose it or not.

Start with blind bailing - do this until you truly do it with no thought. Not do it until bored and you want to go do something else, not do it until it feels comfortable - do it until it is done with no thought. Most of us that have been shooting long enough to get some real form of target panic (hopefully mild as you describe - my personal one was worse) can get to the state of "comfortable and bored" after the first five or ten shots, but it isn't done without thought.

Once there - and you will have to decide for yourself - the harder part starts. How to translate that to shooting at a target? This is the real crux of the issue - even have you truly mastered the idea of blank bailing to the point even a 50 year Zen master of Kyudo would be in awe of you it doesn't mean you will not jerk a release off at ten feet against a 10 foot wide bulls-eye. Sadly this is true, it takes commitment and good practice (note that shooting arrows and practice aren't the same thing - 100 arrows shot with no focus isn't as productive as 10 with great focus).

At this point you will need to have some personal control and shoot at a close range (ten yards at a 60cm FITA face is a good start for most) until it is again an unconscious process. You will most likely need to swap back and forth between the new perception and the old familiar one (blank bailing to begin with - but if you internalize 10 yards at a 60cm face and move to a 40 then back and forth from the 60 to 40) quite a bit. As you learn to shoot then you should gradually make the new perception the unconscious shooting pattern. When that happens either shrink the target some or move further back - do that until you can shoot at whatever distance at whatever target you want.

That is, of course, the ideal situation. Reality is few of us will do that (and that is why few of us are pros - most do not have the natural talent and they do not have the drive to do the work involved). I've never done the above to that extent, I move to the next stage when I'm happy with my shooting instead of truly internalizing the process. You will have to look at what your goals are and decide how to balance the "non-fun" with the "fun".

As I tell my students anytime I give them a training program, archery has to be fun. There are times that means you grind through excercises because your ability to hit the center is the largest impediment to having fun, then there are times where you go shoot as you are happy with your groupings/scores. You have to decide at which point you are at.

In the end anytime you want to improve your scores the above process is the key. A coach may tell you that you need to work on shot sequence, stance, grip, aiming, backtension, or any other number of things but the above is the process you incorporate them. It is the basis for all "work" in archery and it has many names ("10 yard game" being the most common one).
 

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Im doing the exact same thing with the exact same release! I think the only thing that will truly help us is to use enough self control to not let ourselves "punch" the release. I do know that there is a index style release that will not allow you to punch it but I dont know the name of it. I may need to look into finding one of those if I cant get control of my release.
Best post in the entire thread. You are experiencing target panic regardless of how bad you think you cant/dont have it...
You need to beat this with your mind, not by changing something physically...

You know you can execute it correctly, so go back to the basics and stop worrying about pin movement. Get up close to the target and work your way back. Hopefully within one session you will be back adn going correctly:darkbeer:
 

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get rid of the clicker because it's telling you to when to hit the throttle!
go with a standard hinge release and just pull through the shot! aim aim aim that's all you should be doing. go through the shot routine in your head everytime you shoot an arrow, just let the shot go off, don't worry about the results. if you execute properly the end result will be a good shot!
i had to go the other way with mine i need the clicker to remind me to go slow and listen for it with out the clicker i don't know how fast i'm pulling through the shot
 

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develop a shot thought that allows you to control the release. Give your head one thing to focus on. Your mind is probably all over the place between thinking about punching the release, holding on the target, form, etc. You have identified the problem. Now work on that part of your shot only. focus on making yourself set it off properly. You know how to, so concentrate on that exclusively. Don't worry about the target as much right now. Commit to making the shot correctly or this issue will get way worse.
 

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I, too, think it's time to go back to square one. Just go back to the beginning, learn the release again then get back to shooting at some targets.

Wouldn't a safety on a hinge just be one more thing to F with? They really don't need a safety anyway.
 

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get rid of the clicker because it's telling you to when to hit the throttle!
go with a standard hinge release and just pull through the shot! aim aim aim that's all you should be doing. go through the shot routine in your head everytime you shoot an arrow, just let the shot go off, don't worry about the results. if you execute properly the end result will be a good shot!
My thoughts exactly. Your anticipating the shot,which you shouldn't even be thinking about. The saftey is starting your release process, Get rid of it and go to a bt with no clicker and pull through the shot. If it doesn't go off in a couple seconds LET IT DOWN!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
thanks guys for all the help, any more comments or suggestions, input? i really like to hear what several people are saying. thanks
 

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I have said it before, I think personally that the safety will couse more problems than it will fix! I you learn a clicker release properly you draw holding the thumb peg and I have mine set really sensative as soon as I anchor my thumb is coming off the peg, my hand relaxes "click" Then slightly pull with my rhimboids but it takes more than a few saconds as stated in an earlier post for mine to go off prolly around 5-8 second and I only let down if I my pin gets to movind off the bull over 8 seconds... In other words I never rush the shot if it takes a little longer than normal. But the most important thing to remember is to relax your wrist and fingers. Just work with the half moon till you get it pefect where it will click just before your hand is completely relaxed then squeeze.
 
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