Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Would you say that you all spend more, less, or the same amount on traditional archery vs. compound archery?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
792 Posts
More, because I don't shoot compounds. If I did shoot compounds, they would be way more expensive than recurves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Compounds tend to be more expensive. I know Olympic recurve gear can get pricey but I'm happily shooting barebow with my inexpensive ILF. I've been pretty budget conscious with my compound but you still have to figure in all the accessories (sight, release, rest, stabilizer).

If I had to ballpark it:
$250 on my recurve
$800 on my compound

That's including arrows and ignores the fact that I have 4 compound bows.

Sent from my SM-N960W using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,657 Posts
More on traditional archery.
I have several gloves and tabs I don't use. Arrows for bows I no longer own. Broadheads I bought and didn't like or are the wrong weight.
I order insert weights or field points or feathers or shafts or broadheads regularly.
With my compound it's only an arrow now and then or some broadheads. And honestly I use cheap knock off heads for pigs most of the time anyway.
Being able to hunt 30+ weekends per year means I shoot a lot at targets and kill quite a few pigs as well.
Doing it with traditional equipment is definitely more costly overall.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,858 Posts
Much more on barebow equipment.
 

·
Civil but Disobedient
Joined
·
7,248 Posts
I agree with Grantmac. While the low end of recurve is pretty inexpensive, putting together a World Archery style barebow can easily cost $1,500-2,000. Add to that a sight, stabilizer system, and draw check and you have the cost of an Olympic bow.

I cut down the cost of mine by buying my risers used.

I am just taking about the cost of the bow: riser, limbs, rest, plunger, weights, string.

You can buy a pretty high end compound for that kind of money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,558 Posts
New limbs for my Hoyt Compound, $250... my Uukha XX are $900. My Hoyt Invicta I bought new for $1300. My new WFX 29 riser only lists for $1200. Add $900 limbs. Without a doubt I spend more on BB Recurve. My new Bob Lee Recurve is over 2k....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
$250 here $500 there $900 for that riser OK I guess. It's probably not a bad idea to revise your insurance coverage if you get carried away. I tend to buy a whole lot more recurve archery equipment than I did when I was shooting a compound. I'm sure all that equipment will eventually become a source of irritatoin to my wife when I'm gone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Not sure in today’s economy??? Hood wheel bows and accessories have gone way up in price. I have been sitting in an archery shop and watched a guy spend $2400 on a new bow and all the accessories. That would buy me 3 high quality stick bows.

In the end, a guy is gonna spend his money doing the things he like to do, so I’d bet it’s all a wash!

Bisch


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
The Budget is the same. Any cost difference with either will be in the manner that the sport is pursued.
 

·
Team -Third Times a Charm
Joined
·
4,025 Posts
A lot more...
I have 14 recurves and 2 longbows..and all the accessories/arrows for them.

I never had more than 1 compound at a time

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,247 Posts
I would say the average compound guy, keeping up to date with their gear would be more dollars into their gear than the average "traditional" guy. That said, the hardcore "traddies" I know, especially bow collectors have way more dollars in their toys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,331 Posts
I'm not really spending much money at all on trad archery. This is one hobby that I've figured out how to make it pay for itself. I never could do that with compounds. The good bows are so expensive and depreciate so quickly that the only affordable way for me would be to buy a bow and use it for ten years. Not something that I want to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,021 Posts
Lol, buying into the latest hype is very expensive. Buying what pros get free from sponsors has a second mortgage price tag attached to it. Thinking you can buy points by way of the latest, greatest equipment, priceless!
Been there done that and while some years I can drive a Caddy other years I’m thoughtful enough to realize that a Chevy gets me to the same places. “If you have to ask how much, you can’t afford it”...
When archery isn’t fun and becomes a financial burden it’s time to put it behind you.
Nick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,071 Posts
IN the last 30 years, I know exactly what I spent on compounds - 0.00. For 50,000 years bows increase in poundage as you pulled them. Compounds don't, they're the opposite - wobs. LOL.

Bowmania
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Since 1970, I have gone full circle, recurves, compounds and crossbows (shot them from 1999 to 2004 on 3D, there is a division for them in 3D, here).

I got out of compounds in the early 2000's, so obviously, I don't spend anything on them, now but am familiar with the cost of accessories, repair, obsolescence etc. Also, most people at the club shoot compound, some are serious about competition shooting, so I listen and remain somewhat current on them.

My type of recurve/longbow shooting is less costly.

I basically shoot what would fit into Trad 3D or WA Instinctive, though I don't compete seriously.

My bows vary from a couple vintage Yamaha one piece target bows which I bought in the 1970's, to some "middle of the road" trad bows, up to my new Omega Imperial.

Shooting these type of bows is definitely less costly for me, compared to compounds. Especially compared to the competitive compound archers at the club with $1,000.00 to $2,000.00 bows, sights, scopes, stabilisers, rests, tools, etc., often in the $100.00's a pop.

I am sure if one was serious in shooting Olympic style competition, the costs would escalate.

Ones side note; my 1972 Yamaha YG68 target recurve is still viable and people often sat "that's neat, or its beautiful". If you had a 1970's compound, I think they may be more likely to say "what's that!?" :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I belong to a field archery club which is about 70% compounders, many of who are competition archers. Those in that category are continually cycling through the latest release aid, dropaway arrow rest, sights, and then by the time they have done the full loop it's time for a new bow as well since the latest model is out, and if you dont get it then your competitor is going to have a perceived edge. This is not tongue in cheek by the way.

Sure people with disposable $ spend a lot on trad gear through choice but it's not by necessity. The current trend round here is towards self bows, which is a result of the recent lockdown. This is a mighty cheap way to do your shooting if you are resourcefull. (not me though- I'd rather spend the time shooting)
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top