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Discussion Starter #1
I’m new here so I hope I’m posting this in the right location. I’m just getting back into bow hunting and archery after a 4 year break. I used to be a pretty avid deer hunter in NJ and enjoyed 3D shoots, although not competitively. I have been shooting a Hoyt Tenacity which is about 6 years old. I’ve been having some equipment problems, which has me looking at new bows. Wow, there have really been some serious advances in technology over the past couple years. Any way here are some the questions bouncing around in my head:

Should I buy a new bow now? Or get my bow shooting again and wait for the 2007 bows to come out? What month do manufactures typically release their new products for sale?

I’m a self admitted gear junky (mostly fishing and kayak gear over the past couple years and I'm sure Archery will be no different). The bows that I’m considering at the moment are:

• BowTech Tribute
• Mathew’s Switchback XT
• Hoyt Trykon XL

The bows listed above are in the order of preference based on reviews that I have read on this website and others. I haven’t shot any of them, but I have located a semi local archery shop that will let me shoot each bow for a $25 fee, which will be credited against the purchase of a bow. I plan on taking advantage of this offer to see which bow feels most comfortable to me.

I’ve really missed shooting and want to get back into it on a much more serious level then where I left off. So I'm trying to focus mostly on high quality equipment.

Below is a list of accessories I’m considering:
• Sight- Probably Spot Hogg- HOGG-IT or Toxonics MK955
• Rest- Drop Away or Whisker Biscuit????
• Peep Sight- Venom or Switch to a Hind Sight, or other?
• Release- I’ve been using a Flechhunter Rope release (wrist style). I haven’t researched new releases yet.
• Arrows- I still have to put in some time researching these. I shoot Gold Tip Carbons now. I saw a video on quick spin vanes, are they really that good or this a bunch of marketing hype?

The idea of a bow sight that uses optics is very intriguing to me. I’ve never shot a bow with optics, is this something I should seriously consider?

Here is one more loaded question, Should I consider and online retailer for bow or stick with a local pro-shop?

Well I guess that is enough for my first post. Thanks for any advice or guidance that you can offer.

Bill
 

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Bill,

Do you still live in NJ, if so where because I live in the north-western part and I could probably help you if you lived around me.

Anyways...back to your post. The new 07 bows are typically introduced around november, with the exception of some models already being introduced now, such as the Martin Bengal and Archery Research's AR31. With the hunting season right around the corner, NJ's season has been open since the 9th. On average, if you buy a bow now by the time it has been tuned and sighted in, and being comfortable with the bow is usually 3 weeks. Maybe sooner if a pro shop does it for you. I would recommend waiting for the 07's to come out or go to say the harrisburg outdoor convention beginning of Jan. to get really good deals on this years models. If you would really like to start hunting this year, then go ahead and get a bow but I would recommend waiting.

With your bows of choice, Mathews and Bowtech both make really nice bows. Hoyt is ok, you might also want to look at other companies such as Martin, Ross, PSE, just to name a few. At your archery shop, the $25 is that just shooting the bow or is that taking it home for a couple days and trying the bow out. If you only get to shoot it a couple of times, I would say the $25 is absurd. As for your accesories chosen, the Hogg-it is a good sight, I would recommend staying away from scopes if you are only going to hunt, but with the hogg-it you can always buy a lens down the road. For the rest, if you are going be stalking or shooting from a treestand then the WB is great, but I would recommend a drop away for other types of hunting or shooting. For a drop away, the drop zone by trophy ridge is good, so are the trophy taker rests, a great containment drop away is the QAD ultra rest. You might want to get a dozen gold tips if your older arrows are worn out.

Hope this helps.
 

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Well, I am not going to commit much on the bows. I don't like a draw specific bow. Therefore, the only one I would consider is the Tribute.

Sights go with the Spot-Hogg Hogg-it. It is the best multi pin made.

I would go with a Drop-away over a Whiser buscuit. The micro adjustabl Trophy Taker is good.

Arrows, the gold tips are very good. But, I haven't shot a tougher arrow than the Easton Axis. Make sure you get them correctly spined for these bows they are very hard cammed. Run them through On-Target or have someone on here do it.

Magnification is OK for target shooting, but on a hunting bow it can be a lot of problems. Percipitation is one. You don't need it for hunting, unless you are doing a lot of open long shooting.
 

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Bill, out of your choices, definitely go with the Hoyt or Mathews based on my experiences. :darkbeer:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info. Archery Freak I currently live in Ft. Lee. I've already filled my doe tag in NJ so now I can take a buck. Some how on my hunt last Saturday, my sight got bent. Which normally wouldn't be more than a siginifcant inconvenience, but the screws to the sight bracket have been stripped for a while. I've tried heat, liquid wrench, cutting a new groove in the screw, cpretty much everything with no luck. I finally got brave enough to drill out the screws and now I have to re-tap the riser. (I guess I have to buy the sight first so I know what size whole and thread to tap or I guess I could swap out the screws to match the new hole I make.) If I'm successful I'll wait until January to buy a new bow, if not I don't want to sit out the rest of the season, so I'll have to buy one now or as a last resort, I could get my old Golden Eagle shooting again. The GE is 10+/- years old and has slight creeking sound when I draw it, which makes me a little uncomfortable.

The $25 fee is to shoot bows in his shop. I hate to buy a bow without shooting it first, which is what another dealer wanted me to do. I'm not so worried about the cost if it leads me to the right decision. I'm also not married to the three bows selected just leaning in that direction, and would certainly consider some of the other brands. There just appears to be more information in trems of reviews on these bows then some of the others. Also the pro I've been talking with speaks very highly of BowTech.

Oh yeah, I hunt out of Tree Stands.

Thanks again,

Bill
 

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I agree that charging to shoot the bows in the shop is crap, if that is their stance on that then I would bet they won't ley you try out a release without a fee, and so on, find somewhere that wants to earn your business.

I would also get you to go to a shop that has much more than what you are looking at, those three are top end bows and would be great for anybody, but I am betting those are the ones you are looking at because their advertisments, or their owners on here praising them, what is good for me ain't necessarily good for you.

Go shoo them all, martin, PSE, Bowtech, Mathews, Elite, Browning, AR, Newberry, Ryterra, whatever, have an open mind and be ready to decide that the one that feels like the one is the one, not the one that has the largest marketing budget or has the most followers on AT.

Also the Spott Hogg Hogg-it is an awesome isght, I have owned Trophy Ridge Matrix, Dusk Devil II, and this Spott Hogg in the last three or four years and the Spott Hogg is by far the best, bar none.

I had the Trophy Ridge DZ rest for a long time, but now love the Ripcord, which is sort of a marriage tween the containment and the drop aways.

I don't like the HIT inserts, which I have bought five dozen of to learn I don't like it, but there are a ton of arrows out there that are awesome, I personally like Carbon Tech's Whitetails for 60-70# draws and will be going to the Carbon Tech Rhinos when I get my limbs fixed on my #80 Elite.

I would say get a peep then try out a peep less system once you shoot that for a while and decide it isn't for you, I shoot a no peep and love it, but peeps have their place, and though they aren't perfect, they aren't as bad as some folks say they are.

Two bows I would look at that aren't on your list would be the Browning Illusion, which is similair to the PSE Vengence I believe, and the PSE Mach X, I have shot both and both are nice shooters.

good luck
 

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Nothing the matter with a Hoyt Tenacity. Even if it 6 yrs old unless you have a broken limb or a blown cam bearing. A new proper 452 string and cable can solve alot of problems.If you do buy new. No other bow holds re-sale value like a Hoyt. So when somebody says you have to buy a Bowtech or Mathews is you want a good bow and Hoyts are just OK, keep that in mind. A couple years ago, some guy took 3rd in Vegas with an 8 yr old Hoyt.

As far as Vertical limb bows, they are short and quiet, and the design helps cancel out vibration, but when it comes to 3-D or field competiton, top shooters dont shoot the Trykons, the Switchbacks, etc. They are shooting Apex's, Ovations, Ultra Tec and Protecs.More traditional slightly longer axle to axle bows are better shooters and the noise/vibration is still low, just not as low as the VFT style. If you want a hunting bow 1st and just plan to shoot an occaisional 3-D local shoot kinda thing, a Trykon or a Bowtech might be just the ticket. If you plan to spend more time shooting, get a Ultra Tec, Protec or Apex kind of bow.

SpottHogg rules, again, also holds the highest resale value. the most user friendly micro adjustable pin sight ever engineered.
Fletcher trupeep, dont mess with gimmick peeps
Whisker Biscuit only for a Hunting only rig, if you plan to shoot it alot, get a drop away.
Go with a D-loop, scratch the rope release idea. Look at a Truball Short and Sweet SS buckle or a Carter 2 shot buckle.
Arrows, GoldTip is a good choice, stick with the cheap grade shafts, you wont tell the difference. tolerances of .005-.006" is plenty straight...hell... the mil-spec on a M-16A2 barrel straightness tolerance is .003"
Quik Spins are a serious waste of $ and are not very durable, Blazer vanes is the way to go.

have a nice day.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks everyone. I'm digesting all this information. Whether my bow is repairable or not will determine how much time I have to make this decision.

I've only tried two proshops so far. The one a friend swears by (the guy that charges $25 to shoot his bows) and another one located closer to my house but he said I couldn't shoot any of the bows before purchasing one because after I shot it the bow wouldn't be new anymore. I asked him if he test drove his car before he bought it and he said that he did, but that bows weren't the same.

One thing is certain. I'm very interested in getting back into the sport and want to buy new quality gear in the near future. I find shooting very enjoyable and relaxing and didn't realize how much I missed it until I started shooting again this past July.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I guess I'll have to look for some more shops. The shops I've been to, sell only archery equipment and have ranges. That is why I referred to them as proshops. I haven't been going to the local outdoor or sporting goods stores that sell hunting, fishing, camping, and boating ect.

I'm not sure if it is appropriate to ask for shop reccomendation here. If it is I'd love to get some suggestions. I live in Ft. Lee, NJ and work in NYC and would love to find a quality shop in the NJ/NY Metro area.
 

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hell....take a road trip to Lancaster, Pa , leave early this saturday morning. go to Lancaster Archery, you will be able to try most anything you want there.
 

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I go to my nearest shop way too often, too often cause I always buy something while there, but anyway I probably shoot a different bow every time I am there, he knows I just bought my bow from him and am not looking for a new bow, but it is fun to shoot something else, and that is how you earn business. I also won't order stuff from online if I can get it from him, he has earned my business, and earns it again every time I am there.

The archery shop business is a sector of retail that requires very high service, one reason, in my opinion, that a lot of shop fail. It isn't wally world where price sells, service sells, most guys I know would drive an extra hour each way to go pay fifty more bucks for a bow that will get the service it needs, and would do so without a complaint.

Shoot every bow you can, without paying for them, and see what you like, also talk to your buddies about their buddies, if they have a bow like what you are interested in, and same draw length meet up and shoot their rig, but don't buy something unshot, and don't pay for shooting one. I kind of understand what the guy is trying to accomplish, but there are better ways to do it. If I were new to archery or new to an area I would go and ask to shoot some bows at each shop in the area just to see what kind of guy you are dealing with, and let that, plus other interactions, determine if I wanted to do business with them or not. To me a pro shop should be like going to see an old friend, even if you just started going there, if you don't feel like his buddy, you are in the wrong shop.

good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If I had to prioritize, I want a bow that is going to hunt well and shoot fairly well on the 3D range. If end up getting real into shooting 3D I guess I could buy another bow specifically for shooting 3D. Hey after all I have over a dozen flyrods, why have only 1 bow.

I definately would prefer to develop a relationship with a shop and a pro to buying over the net. I'm going to need a lot of help on my quest to becoming a better archer.
 

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I would suggest getting a bow that has around 32"ATA for treestand hunting, I would also get a pendulum sight because they are made specifically for treestands.

For a 3-D rig get a longer ATA like around 35-38" ATA, the longer ATA provides more stability for longer shots, you can get a Spott-Hog Hog-it sight for this.

If you don't think that you are going to get a bow this year, I would recommend going out to the Harrisburg convention. I was thinking about picking up a bow out there for myself. The bows are discounted so that they can get rid of their 06 models and get the 07's. I saw one bow (AR 34) that retails for close to $600 and they were selling it for $230 approx. Plus you can check out all the new (07) bows and talk to the companies.
 

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I am a short guy, 5'8" at most, and I still like at the least a 33-34" Axle to axle bow, just shoots better for me, my Mathews Outback is sweet and I shoot it well, but I can shoot a longer ATA like my Elite E500 better, even though it is not quite as smooth, and it is #80 vice #70.

Go into a good shop that takes care of it's people and ask to shoot every bow on the racks, find a bow you like, for instance a medium single cam bow with a 36" axle to axle, and shoot everything comparable. Too many people decide they want to shoot the latest Hoyt, mathews, Bowtech, or whatever and shoot that companies latest and greatest, but never shoot the other models, you might shoot better with a long ata bow, but will drop a grand on a set up fromt the big three and then six months later sell it at a loss to buy a used Conquest 3, or Old Glory.

Leave the shop knowing you will be happy with that bow for atleast three months, when the newest version of yours comes out and you want to shoo that.

But if nothing else, shoot them all and see what you like, I know a 70 year old man that can shoot a better four shot group at 70yrds than I can at 40, and he does it with a 3lb parker that is about 30ata, any bow is more accurate than the guy holding it.
 

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bearclaw37 said:
I agree that charging to shoot the bows in the shop is crap, if that is their stance on that then I would bet they won't ley you try out a release without a fee, and so on, find somewhere that wants to earn your business.

[. . .]
If a pro-shop operator sets up three bows for me to try out on his range I believe it's reasonable for him to charge me $25 against an eventual purchase. I would expect to pay around $10 to rent a bow, which is set up to fit me, and to shoot it for about 1/2 hour to see if I like it or not.

I'm talking about a bow which is approximately my draw length, preferred weight range, and enough shooting time to get a good feel for the bow. Not just a particular model off the rack which is too short or too long, too heavy or too light, and two or three shots.

I bought a handgun from a dealer who charged me $10 plus the price of a box of 50 .357s to try out a particular model on his range. When I bought the gun he knocked $10 off the price and threw in a box of ammo and a cleaning kit.

The dealer who charges $25 to test shoot three bows probably has his fill of guys who try out bows at his pro-shop and then buys from a discount source.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
My current bow is 36 1/2 ATA and I never found it to be too long or awkward while hunting from a tree stand. I have really been looking at Bow length ATA as a deciding factor. My gravitation to the three bows on my short list has been derived more from reading reviews and the current propaganda then experience. Now I’m not so sure; I really need to get out and shoot some new bows and see what feels right.

Since so many people have stated that they think it is unfair for a dealer to charge me to try some bows I think I'm going to look for an alternative place. Although keep thinking that $25 (which I get back if I buy) is cheap if the shop is convenient and the pro is knowledgeable. I'm reading a lot but it is going to take me a long time to be able to competently tune my own bow.
 

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Bill Becker said:
[. . .]Although keep thinking that $25 (which I get back if I buy) is cheap if the shop is convenient and the pro is knowledgeable.[. . .]
There ya go.

If this fellow is asking for $25 to let you try three different bows, and he's willing to credit the $25 toward a purchase, it follows that he will do his best to help you get a good fit.

Could turn out to be a wise investment. The most you have to lose is $25 but you could come out way ahead in terms of satisfaction.
 

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You made some valid points about the pro, but I have seen guys that looking at bows and saying while the shop pro wasn't around that they were going to buy online to save some cash, then get excellent service and buy there, then see them again there buying their entire set up from him cause he got treated like a person.

There are two trains of thought there.

Another thing is he mentioned it was a small shop, if his inventory is limited then I would still go somewhere else. And this time of year almost every shop has limited inventory.
 
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