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What seems to have a better reliabilty track record, a cable or limb driven rest? Those of you that have had both, whats on your bow now? I know alot is personal preference, but what made you decide ro go that route?
 

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I've tried both. Cable has never moved at all, ever. Limb had given me more problems. when i tied it on to the limb it moved. Some rests give you a little plastic piece that sticks to the limb which is supposed to hold the rope in place. Works fine until you bump it or it gets wet. Since it's such a long distance from the rest to the limb the rope also got snagged on branches and such. None of those issues has happened since i went back to cable driven. Just my two cents.
 

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I've been running Hamskea Versa Rest on my bows for a few years now. Never had a issue with my hunting or target setups. Limb driven all the way for me.
 

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What seems to have a better reliabilty track record, a cable or limb driven rest? Those of you that have had both, whats on your bow now? I know alot is personal preference, but what made you decide ro go that route?

Here's the deal with limb driven technology and how it ties in with the standard mechanical rest:

The time frame from which you first release the string and it begins to accelerate, to the time your arrow detached itself from the string and initiates flight, is known as the "shot cycle".

What a drop away rest is designed to do is provide a resting point, known as the "launch platform", to support the shaft until it rea he's a velocity which it can sustain its own flight, a term known as the point of "self sustainability".

For maximum rest performance, you preferably want your launch platform to remain erect for about 70% plus or minus of the shot cycle, then instantaneously drop in a way which clears the fletching completely, and doesn't bounce back up and contact the fletching. If it stays up too long, your fletching won't clear the launch platform. If it drops prematurely, you experience something called "arrow dip".

Limb driven rests basically offer three guarunteed advantages- because they're operated via your limb and not your cable,

1- They guaruntee an erect platform for the maximum amount of time desired within the shot cycle (a quality drop away is more than capable of doing this)
2- They eliminate the possibility for pulling the lower cam out of time due to incorrect setup since they don't attach to your cable (a quality drop away will never do this if set up properly)
3- They're easier and quicker to install (because proper setup of a drop away needs to be exactly that, a proper setup)

There's nothing wrong with them, but they will not out-perform a good, high quality drop away that's set up correctly. It all comes down to a matter of preference.

I shot the Vapor Trail limb driver for about 3 months, but ended up switching to the QAD HDX, and of which I now have 2, one for each of my bows. When properly set up, I know from experience neither one outperforms each other. I can tell you that the HDX has a mechanism that prevents shelf jumping, and in terms of General quality, there's a reason they're so expensive, they're absolutely gorgeous, and extraordinarily well crafted.

Hope this helps


Buck
 

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QAD HDX Ultrarest for me as well for most of the same reasons that Buck so brilliantly pointed out above.
 

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I use both but prefere limb driven.
 

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Limb driven for the reasons Buck pointed out :) In addition when tuning and changing strings limb driven is simpler than a cable driven.
 

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I have owned both. A Rip Cord Code Red and a my current Vapor Trails. When I bought my Boss, and needed a new rest, I went back to the limb driven. Easy setup, and they perform flawlessly. I will not shoot anything else. Nothing wrong with the ripcord, I would buy an Ace if I had a draw board, but that is something I currently lack.
 

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I have a Limbdriver Pro V & QAD HDX. Two different bows. Both work very well, look good on the bows, and no preference.
 

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Had two different limb drivers, same brand, seemed to work better in warm weather. Switched to a qad recently and I love it.
 
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