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should there be cam lean on a single cam bow??
when i hold a shaff against my bottum cam it is close to 5/8" to the right by the time it gets to my peep.
should there be cam lean at all on a single cam??
 

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I have seen some single cam bows with some nasty cam lean, but they seem to shoot well anyway. Because the cam on a single cam bow is often much bigger than the cams on a twin cam bow, any cam lean on a single cam bow will appear to be much worse than it is on a twin cam. Most single cam bows have a bit of cam lean.

Automan
 

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The truth is there shouldn't be any cam lean on any bow, single,dual, binary or any other cam. The fact is though that with any bow that uses a cable rod/slide to pull cables out of the way of the arrow's path there is going to be torque/twist applied to the limbs which is what causes cam lean in the first place. The shorter the a2a of the bow the steeper this angle will be.

Cam lean/ limb twist can be partly compensated for by twisting a cable yoke at the idler wheel on a single cam bow or a dual cam bow with split harness, but this only minimizes the limb twist at that part of the draw cycle, whether it be at rest or full draw. Because the stresses on the cables are constantly changing as the bow goes through it's draw cycle said cam lean is never eliminated.

It is still my belief that this twisting of the limb tips is the primary cause of most limb failures.
 

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You're an enlightened man, bfisher. :lightbulb
No doubt, cam lean leads to premature limb failure and shortens string, cables, and component life !
I now shoot 3 track bows exclusively and haven't had to deal with cam lean for the last 9 years. :thumbs_up
 

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You're an enlightened man, bfisher. :lightbulb
No doubt, cam lean leads to premature limb failure and shortens string, cables, and component life !
I now shoot 3 track bows exclusively and haven't had to deal with cam lean for the last 9 years. :thumbs_up
Enlightned? Not really. Just been shooting compounds bows for almost 40 years, recurves a few years before that. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that bow limbs are designed to bend in a straight line and not be twisted. On standard vertical limbed bows the limbs flex backwards and return in a forward motion when shot. Parallel limbs travel more in a vertical direction, toward each other, but in both cases supposedly in a straight line. At least that's the theory.

Take a look at any recurve or long bow. It's pretty much assumed that any with twisted limbs is junk. Yeh, it might still shoot, but..... Why would a compound be any different? Twisted limbs mean lateral nock travel; strings not tracking straight in the groove because the cam is leaning; same thing for the cables; servings being frayed and/or cut because the cam and module tracks are crooked. The list can go on and on.

Some will argue that it's not a big issue. If it isn't then why are companies now trying to do something about it. Because, IMO, it hasn't become a big issue until the last few years as bows got shorter and shorter, limbs got shorter and shorter, and cams have gotten larger and larger. I think certain companies are searching for answers to some of these issues. Then they'll have something to sell next year or the year after or...........Then there are those who, just like their most loyal fanboys, are still in denial about it rather than just facing up to it.
 
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