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Discussion Starter #1
I'm just trying to get a very basic grasp on binary cam timing.

So, when timing cams, do you want them the same when the bow is at rest, or fully drawn.
 

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im in for this
 

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At full draw you want them together. So say the top cam hits first you would take the loop off the outside post on the top cam and put a twist in it. This will speed up the bottom cam. I just got strings for my dad binary cam alliegence both cables are 38 inches long so if the builder made them well I should only have to do maybe a twist and there in time. At static position they will be close. You want both stops together it creates a strong back wall. Hoyt you have your power cable and control cable. For every 2 twists you do with your power cable would be 4 with the control cable.
 

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Ok, here is where I'm getting lost. The guy at the shop tuned my bow and he knows what he is doing, and I don't know anything about tuning, so I'm trying to make sense of it all.

From the best of my recollection, he put the bow on a draw machine and looked at the came timing when the machine drew it back.

Next he added a twist to the top cam. so I assume it was lagging a little behind the bottom cam and this sped it up.

I cant remember, but he put on a d-loop at this time, or possibly before the above step...I don't recall.

So after a upper cable twist, all looked good on the drawing machine.

After that, at full draw, he set the draw stops to the limbs. This was positively done drawn off the D-loop.

Now, here is what is throwing me that I'm trying to understand...ok, I assume the cams are timed, and then then draw stops are adjusted to the limbs.

Not having my arrows or sight at the shop, this was as far as we got.

So I get home and am just looking over things, and see that my draw stops are slightly different in their slots on the cam.

So, what is confusing me is how can the cams be timed at full draw, the draw stops set to the limbs at full draw, yet the stops aren't equally placed on each cam?
 

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Then there not together...if there in different spots so they touch at the same time your cams aren't in the same position. I have a prime with the outside dashes. I move both my draw stops to the 85% let off postition. I do the draw board watch the dashs on the outside of the cam and where they match up to the cables. I go though out the whole cycle intil they hit the stops at the same time now I'm happy. Now I move one draw stop to the middle so my let off is around 75% back to the draw board make the draw stop hit now I slide my other draw stop in postition. My cams at static position are a hair off but match thought out the cycle. Your guy hacked it a little
 

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Ok, here is where I'm getting lost. The guy at the shop tuned my bow and he knows what he is doing, and I don't know anything about tuning, so I'm trying to make sense of it all.

From the best of my recollection, he put the bow on a draw machine and looked at the came timing when the machine drew it back.

Next he added a twist to the top cam. so I assume it was lagging a little behind the bottom cam and this sped it up.

I cant remember, but he put on a d-loop at this time, or possibly before the above step...I don't recall.

So after a upper cable twist, all looked good on the drawing machine.

After that, at full draw, he set the draw stops to the limbs. This was positively done drawn off the D-loop.

Now, here is what is throwing me that I'm trying to understand...ok, I assume the cams are timed, and then then draw stops are adjusted to the limbs.

Not having my arrows or sight at the shop, this was as far as we got.

So I get home and am just looking over things, and see that my draw stops are slightly different in their slots on the cam.

So, what is confusing me is how can the cams be timed at full draw, the draw stops set to the limbs at full draw, yet the stops aren't equally placed on each cam?
I think it's all because of where the d-loop is located on the string.
 

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Ill add to what I'm saying static position isn't as big of deal as the finish. Reason is due to cam shapes and the design of full roll over. If you only have one cam roll over, you will have a spongy bouncy backwall even if both stops are touching at the same time. I say push your stops to max let off and go though the bow again. This is why I have a press now, shops are lazy and just say good enough. Well good enough for my bows aren't acceptable. You want them perfect
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think it's all because of where the d-loop is located on the string.
I think that's what he was saying was the D-loop position.

I'm just trying to wrap my mind around how the cams can be timed at full draw, but the limb stops in different positions at full draw. I'm not understanding it.
 

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I think that's what he was saying was the D-loop position.

I'm just trying to wrap my mind around how the cams can be timed at full draw, but the limb stops in different positions at full draw. I'm not understanding it.
You top or bottom limbs might flex more then the other ones.
 

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The draw stops need to be km the same spot. So something is fishy. Of the dloop is set level through the berger button them check your bow's tiller. That would definitely throw off the timing.
 

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Most bows "Not all" do not have the burger hole in the center of the bow.
So when you set the D loop even with center of burger hole you are not in the center of the string.
There for you do not pull exactly center. The string is shorter above the D-loop than below the D-Loop.
Cams have to be adjusted to compensate for this difference.
 

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What bow are we talking about? Some binary cam bows like the Elites have engraved marks on the cams to set the cam synchronization, the draw stops are then adjusted later as done by the bow tech at your shop. Some other binary cam bows don't have cam marks so the draw stops are set identically and the cables are adjusted so that both hit together. All should be synchronized at full draw.
 

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Most bows "Not all" do not have the burger hole in the center of the bow.
So when you set the D loop even with center of burger hole you are not in the center of the string.
There for you do not pull exactly center. The string is shorter above the D-loop than below the D-Loop.
Cams have to be adjusted to compensate for this difference.
Hoyts used to (and maybe still do) make the cams very slightly different to compensate for this.
 

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Looks like there are two things here. Getting cams to match at draw is not timing. This is syncing the cams. Timing is the position of the cams. You can advance or ****** the timing with cams in sync. Adjusting timing changes the draw curve.
 
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