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Can someone explain Mathews AVS to me?

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I can't seem to figure out what the advantage is to Mathews AVS system over just running the split yoke to the axles instead. Is there some performance advantage to the smaller cams inside the bigger cams? Hopefully someone smarter than me can explain what the purpose of it is.
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Able to get decent speeds with an aggressive profile, while throwing another eccentric in to make the draw smooth. Not only that but it balances out some cam lean, it's just not adjustable like the Overdrive Cam system on the Bowtechs.

I think Bowtechs split yoke Overdrive binary system is the best cam system in the industry....just put on crappy unreliable platforms.
 

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I have owned them all and liked the AVS the least. I will take yokes any day and OD Binary cams over any of the other systems.
 

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AVS and Overdrive work in exactly the same way, with the exception that the Overdrive has nice adjustable yokes where the AVS has a limb in the way.

The important bit is where the middle if the AVS wheel is through the draw cycle. Picture that point as an anchor for the second end of the cable.

In the first half of the draw, that anchor on the end of the cable is moving away from the opposite cam as you draw the string. Now we have both cams taking up the same cable at once, so you have less mechanical advantage. The draw weight ramps up quicker.

In the second half of the draw cycle, the AVS anchor is moving back down, towards the opposite cam. So each cable track is effectively taking up less cable as you rotate the cam. That translate to an increase in mechanical advantage. Further, because the AVS is now feeding out the same cable that the opposite cable track is taking up, we basically have a binary setup, keeping everything in sync.

Basically we've made the same cam yield a heavier draw weight at the beginning and a lower one at the end, making the draw more pleasant - or getting closer to a constant peak weight (maximum energy storage) with a less radical cam profile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have owned them all and liked the AVS the least. I will take yokes any day and OD Binary cams over any of the other systems.
Was this because of the lack of adjustability or another reason? I agree with the OD binaries are probably the best system out there right now but I just can't bring myself to buy a Bowtech until they've had a few years of problem free limbs. Just too many horror stories floating around for me to pull the trigger on one right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
AVS and Overdrive work in exactly the same way, with the exception that the Overdrive has nice adjustable yokes where the AVS has a limb in the way.

The important bit is where the middle if the AVS wheel is through the draw cycle. Picture that point as an anchor for the second end of the cable.

In the first half of the draw, that anchor on the end of the cable is moving away from the opposite cam as you draw the string. Now we have both cams taking up the same cable at once, so you have less mechanical advantage. The draw weight ramps up quicker.

In the second half of the draw cycle, the AVS anchor is moving back down, towards the opposite cam. So each cable track is effectively taking up less cable as you rotate the cam. That translate to an increase in mechanical advantage. Further, because the AVS is now feeding out the same cable that the opposite cable track is taking up, we basically have a binary setup, keeping everything in sync.

Basically we've made the same cam yield a heavier draw weight at the beginning and a lower one at the end, making the draw more pleasant - or getting closer to a constant peak weight (maximum energy storage) with a less radical cam profile.
That makes sense to me. I've watched the video explanation and was still a little confused but I think you do a better job of explaining it. Thanks.
 

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Not as tunable as the other systems is my reason for disliking them. I went crazy trying to tune my Chill X but I believe it was something that could have easily been done with yokes. I tried a few different spined arrows, 2 different arrow rests, made every rest adjustment I could think of, swapped top hats around and then swapped top and bottom limbs with little improvement. I should not have to go through this with a brand new bow.
Was this because of the lack of adjustability or another reason? I agree with the OD binaries are probably the best system out there right now but I just can't bring myself to buy a Bowtech until they've had a few years of problem free limbs. Just too many horror stories floating around for me to pull the trigger on one right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Not as tunable as the other systems is my reason for disliking them. I went crazy trying to tune my Chill X but I believe it was something that could have easily been done with yokes. I tried a few different spined arrows, 2 different arrow rests, made every rest adjustment I could think of, swapped top hats around and then swapped top and bottom limbs with little improvement. I should not have to go through this with a brand new bow.
Can't blame you there. That seems to be the case with all yokeless binaries, they either tune great right away or you're in for a nightmare. At least once you get them figured out they should stay that way for the life of the bow.
 
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