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In regards to bow grip hand placement, it seems most books and “experts” recommend placing the grip ONLY on the padded area under the thumb and NOT allowing it to venture into the crease in your hand. But this does not allow the bone-on-bone contact found at the base of the crease. They claim the padded thumb placement is more repeatable.

However, a lot of good shooters I know have the base of their grips resting on that bone at the base of the wrist (into the crease). And an NFAA Level 4 coach at my league told me to “put the grip partially into the crease” for that bone-on-bone contact.

When I position my grip on the padded area (shown in red) I have to increase muscle tension in my hand to resist the bow’s tension. When placed on the base of the hand (shown on blue) I can relax my hand and forearm.

So which is the optimum and most efficient hand position placement? Let’s settle this thing…if possible.
 

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i hold my bow as in the blue area,if i hold it like the red area it doesn't feel as stable or comfortable.my bow just naturally goes into the blue area,if i move it out more into the red area i don't seem to be able to repeat that grip all the time.so i go for consistancy and stick with what feels right,i suppose it's the old thing of if it works don't change it.
 

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My vote goes to the blue area. I have been shooting in the red area and it just cost me a whole buinch of points at our state shoot. The area at the base of the thumb is just too hard to be consistant with. Thinking about having my bow hand removed and a U shaped channes grafted into the bone on my wrist, but my wife says "NO".
 

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X's R Us
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blue is better you still haven't crossed the life line. Tried putting something slippery on your hand or grip and seeing where the bow grip wants to go?
 

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CottonHeadedNinnyMuggins
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My grip is like the blue.

I say use whichever one allows you to shoot relaxed.
 

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EPLC Stabilization 4-Sale
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Blue looks fine to me...
 

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Blue

Blue is much more stable for me as well.

-Chief
 

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blue

I use blue as well.. when i try to use my palm it always ends up slipping or i get some kick outa my bow.. i like resting it in the grove at the bone down in the blue..
Justin
 

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Mathews Vertix, CBE Sight, Trophy Taker Rest, B Stinger Stabilizer, Gold Tip Arrows, Carter Release
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I also agree with the blue area although it seems that nothing is set in stone when it comes to this archery thing. I believe the proof is in "your" results and what works for "you" may not work for another. For years a straight bow arm was improper, now it's correct. Look at some of the top shooters forms. Jeff Hopkins and Michelle Ragsdale's (to name two that come to mind) elbows appears too high and their release hands are basically thumb pointed straight down. This "improper" form is what keeps them from being great shooters. :rolleyes: :D :D
 

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blue for me, but my blue is more toward the life line. also I found out I'm better with a higher grip well more medium I guess rather than low. Low seems to make my left forearm sore...
 

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Occam's Razor
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Stick the hand on the grip, tuck the first three fingers, turn your hand at about a 45%, soap it up for best place, and shoot............:cool:

If that don't work, try something else........:D ...............ck
 

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I shoot using the RED.......I don't grip the handle at all in this position. I keeps the bow level, up and down also. Using this position my hand doesn't try to grip or torque the bow.

May not be for everyone but it works for me.:D
 

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Red works best for me.

I think it is more difficult for me to grab (=bad) the bow with the "red" grip, since my thumb has less leverage on the handle. Any grip pressure has almost no effect in the way the bow is supported.

The "blue" grip allows my hand to have more leverage on the bow handle. Consequently, even slight unintentional grabbing has a large side-to-side effect on how the bow is supported.

Likewise for wrist tension and up-down pressure on the handle. Variations in wrist tension affect whether there is more support above or below the center of the blue patch.

If I can reliably and thouroughly relax, it doesn't make any difference. The advantage of red comes when I am tired, cold, shooting in the wind, or stressed in some other way; it provides a more consistant grip during the tough conditions.

It is easier for me to shoot well with red, but I can do either on a good day.

Scott
 

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I shoot with the grip half way on my thumb, my thumb is the only thing that is touching the bow, then i curl my fingers up it looks like i'm giving someone the thumbs up sign but sideways, this way there is now way i can torque the bow, it takes alot of pratice to get used to shooting this way, plus if you shoot with either grip shown above with a 6" ot less brace height the string will hit your wrist everytime.
 

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yea something like that, looks like you gave it a name :)
 

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OX;

Some of this depends on the grip (high, med, low, thick, narrow) riser (heavy, light, long, short), how the archer is built physically (i.e. how large are his/her hands, how much holding weight is used, how long/thick are his/her arms, etc.) and how the archer carries tension through his/her form (i.e. is s/he employing a push/pull, or a pull only; is their arm bent, how much rotation is in the bow-arm, etc.).

Practically you could have the pressure of the grip in any number of point - going even deeper than the blue zone you outlined, to the lifeline without any problems, and all the way to the red - and still have a "workable" grip/pressure point. The trick is consistency, which is why some archers use Vaseline on a new riser/grip to see where their grip ends up (works better the rest of their form is consistent). But really, you could make any number of pressure points/contact points work, some require much more work to be consistent with though.

-CG
 

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Using vaseline or anything else to make things slippery in order to determine the best placement sounds kinda interesting....
I thought it hurt when my draw hand slipped and punched me in the mouth. I'd hate to be behind the bow when my slippery grip let loose!!

Mike
 
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