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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, so another newbie question here. I just recently started learning trad archery, and have been shooting a 35# Samick recurve for a few weeks now. I've watched more youtube videos than I can count, and one thing I notice is some of the instructors in the videos swear by having a perfectly vertical bow, ensuring your limbs are perfectly straight up and down, top to bottom. Then other videos, the instructors "cant" or tilt their bows, saying its more comfortable, and shooting comfortably helps ensure good form. One of the most frustrating things I've found since my recent desire to learn archery is that there is 100 different ways and methods of doing things, and every single one is sworn by one person or another. So, being as I am just starting out, and still developing form, is canting my bow a good idea or should I continue to shoot the bow vertically. Thanks in advance to anyone who can offer some advice or experiences.
 

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I'm pretty new myself, but here's my take on that. Most of the people I have seen shoot with their bow canted are people shooting bows that don't have much of a shelf or rest on them, and they do that partly to make sure the arrow is stable on the rest or shelf. With your Samick, you shouldn't have that problem. I'm shooting a Sage, so I've got a similar riser to yours. I've thought about canting my bow, but I've decided against it, with the exception of times when I might be shooting from my knees or maybe there is an overhead obstruction like a branch or inside a blind. The other reason I don't make canting part of my routine is that I feel it is more difficult to duplicate your form when you are canting. Are you at 20deg, 30deg? How can you tell from one shot to the next if you're lining up the same way? To me, it's easier to be more consistent when shooting with my bow in a vertical position. Your milage may vary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply, I actually shoot a sage also, and I never thought about them doing it for shelf space. That makes sense. I actually find I shoot better if I ensure my bow is vertical, and I think if start canting I would prob throw what little consistency i've gained out the window. Just hard to know if your doing things the best way with soooo many opinions out there. Being as I'm new to archery, and I enjoy it immensely, I try to get advice on anything I am unsure about from people with experience and knowledge. I've read enough horror story threads out there to know that the best thing a new archer can do is accept the fact that they know nothing, and learn from others who have the experience. These site is a wealth of information for people who are willing to take advice and learn, and I'm determined not to be one of the stone headed people who learn everything the hard way haha.
 

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B -

For a new shooters, a vertical bow is preferable, since it's not only the easiest to reproduce, it's the hardest to screw up. Over canting can mess with shoulder geometry and lead to inconsistent draw lengths and faulty releases.

After you think your form is solid, then it becomes personal preference.
The way to check if you're canting correctly is to have some one watch you shoot both vertically and canted and see if your draw length changes. If it does, you're messing up!

Viper1 out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the information Viper. I definitely know what you mean by vertical being the easiest to reproduce and hardest to screw up. When I was out shooting this morning, I decided to launch an arrow with a canted bow just for laughs, I ended up having to jog for my arrow as I missed my bag target by several inches. Thats the first time I've ever missed my bag target since I've started learning a few weeks ago. Lesson learned haha.
 

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Newbie myself here, but I am actually being taught to cant the bow slightly by the guy I'm getting informal instruction from. As he explains it, the reason why is so I get the bow out of the way of the target so I can use the point of the arrow as my aiming point. I did short-draw it a bit initially, but once I became consistent with my anchor point that didn't become much of an issue any more. I have tried vertical and canting, and with the way I'm learning I've been a lot more accurate with the cant so far.
 

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Newbie myself here, but I am actually being taught to cant the bow slightly by the guy I'm getting informal instruction from. As he explains it, the reason why is so I get the bow out of the way of the target so I can use the point of the arrow as my aiming point. I did short-draw it a bit initially, but once I became consistent with my anchor point that didn't become much of an issue any more. I have tried vertical and canting, and with the way I'm learning I've been a lot more accurate with the cant so far.
Canting CAN produce the correct alignment of the bow-arm, generally when combined with a low-wrist and gripping the bow. A better option is holding the bow vertically with the correct grip (loose, with sling) and fore-arm rotation.

Unless the bow has a very small sight-window and you are using a split fingered hold then there really isn't a visual requirement for canting. The biggest problem with it is correctly reproducing the same angle for all shots, something that adds an additional level of complexity into an already complex skill.

You won't find any of the really accurate guys shooting with a cant, except in a few narrow circumstances.

-Grant
 

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He's a fan of Byron Ferguson who likes to cant so that's probably why. I have a 64" Ben Pearson Cougar and so far canting slightly is helping me hit the target more reliably. I have no expectations to shoot in tournaments or anything like that, I just want to bowhunt and shoot for fun.
 

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Target shooters and elevated rest usually go vertical, it's more reproducible. Hunters shooting off the shelf usually cant. Its faster, hold arrow on shelf better and gives more of a view which is important when you are trying to pick that spot on your animal. Both ways work fine. You choose.
 

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I should have added. This is traditional archery. There are many different traditions and they all are proven through time to work amazingly well at their specific applications. The trick is simply to find a tradition that will be suitable to your application. I won't say best suited because sometimes it's fun to get a little sideways on convention. Just enjoy.
 

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I started off-the-shelf with one of those red clothesline-string 5lb longbows as a kid. No sights, no rest, no stabilizer, nada, so I canted it slightly to keep the arrow on the shelf. Today, I run a Samick Red Stag, and naturally cant. If I don't cant, I am worried the arrow is going to wander off the shelf, and keeping it upright puts a hard strain on my wrist and arm. For the record, the Red Stag really fits a low-hold in my hand.

However, I also have a Bear junior compound ('cause it's a cute little junior bow and thus really fun to toy with), that I keep upright because it has a rest and tru-glo sight on the riser. Likewise, I had a Bear vintage compound (still do, but unstrung it), and this was shot upright as well, due to pins and a rest. My friend's PSE longbow was an upright due to the rest, but his smaller longbow (also OTS/no sight like mine) was canted.

Really, I'd say it's what you're used to and what the bow is. If you have a rest, or can put a rest on - DO, and keep it upright. I wouldn't tip a compound either, if at all possible, as torquing the string left or right (which you are more likely to do if the bow is canted, since it's harder to judge L/R axis movement when you're at a diagonal hold) can pull the string off the cams on a compound. A recurve can twist limbs or at best have a bad release.



Just my $.02.

Also - FIRST POST. Good morning (evening!) all!
 
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