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chronograph

886 Views 14 Replies 13 Participants Last post by  jmvargas
I've heard many here talking about chrono-ing their arrows, but I personally don't know anyone who actually owns one of those things except archery stores. Do individual archer's or coaches here on a.t. actually own these things?
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· Genesis 21:20
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Yes.

These days, they aren't that expensive and can provide you some useful, objective data when comparing equipment.

John.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Yes.

These days, they aren't that expensive and can provide you some useful, objective data when comparing equipment.

John.
The only one I know about is the Easton chronograph, unfortunately it only comes with the bow force mapper and other stuff that I don't want. What other brands and manufacturers are available? Where did you guys get yours? How accurate are they?
cost: $599
eastonarchery.com/products/accessory/104

thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Is one name brand better or worst than another when it comes to chronographs? I looked at the suggested websites and found several in the $100 range, how do they measure up to the $599 Easton chronograph?

When using a chrongraph is the exact fps speed important?
or
When using a chrongraph relative fps speed is important? (ie) comparing one arrow to another arrow?
or
both?
 

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computer solution - chrono

People who are far geekier and smarter than I am report that there is a function on some computers that can measure an interval between the sound of the release and the sound of the arrow hitting the target and compute fps from that, probably with a correction for the distance the sound travels from the target.
There might have been a thread on that here on archerytalk or perhaps on the archeryinterchange-uk or Saggitarius.
You could search for that if you have the skills to use it.
 

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I own one and I bought it because there isn't a proshop anywhere near me. They are less than a hundred bucks and it's just a great tool to use when trying to milk the most out of your setup.

That computer / sound idea is brilliant. I may try and work that out.
 

· Time is ticking away
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I don't own one and probably never will as I find them inaccurate. I say that only because I have shot same bow, same arrow at different chronies and get totally different answers. I'm not smart when it comes to these but I can't explain it. BTW both in archery shops.
 

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I don't own one and probably never will as I find them inaccurate. I say that only because I have shot same bow, same arrow at different chronies and get totally different answers. I'm not smart when it comes to these but I can't explain it. BTW both in archery shops.
How much different?

I wonder if and how it is possible to calibrate a chronograph?
 

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I don't own one and probably never will as I find them inaccurate. I say that only because I have shot same bow, same arrow at different chronies and get totally different answers. I'm not smart when it comes to these but I can't explain it. BTW both in archery shops.
Some chronographs (depending on type) can be affected by lighting or humidity conditions. The more important thing is that the results are repeatable.

And yes, they can be calibrated.

-Andrew
 

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Wouldn't be too hard to calibrate-

You could use another pair of photoreceptors, some lights, and a precise timer (and some constants to offset the fact that we're not in a vacuum, the speed of electricity through the apparatus, and the like). Doing that, you'd just be making your own chronograph though =)

You could also use Audacity (AV software) to measure the time between two events that make a sound (say, the arrow's release and it hitting the target). Then, with a little math (and again, some constants for current speed of sound and drag on the arrow slowing it down), you can figure out the velocity.


The other question raised is one of accuracy vs precision. Which would be more useful to the archer shooting a real 204 feet per second with her regular setup (for the sake of the argument, we'll assume that's 204 fps every time)- a chronograph that gives precise readings, but always 10 fps low, or one that gives results between 201 and 207 fps?

(Forgive me, John- before you have to say anything, I'll shut up now about equipment and get back to practicing.)
 

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i have had the pro chrono pal for the last 5 years and use it for archery and my airguns.....excellent value at $140 which already includes the indoor kit....great teaching aid in helping you get a consisent finger release...i notice that my good releases chrono at EXACTLY the same speed.....my bad releases can give as much as a 4 FPS variance but then i always am able to diagnose and correct....hard to do without the chrono......
 
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