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Does having a release set up with the "click" make it harder to set off? I am devoted to getting this back tension thing down. I have been using the "click on my Scott release. It seems to be hard to get the shot off some times.
What do you all think.
 

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Hi,
Firts off I wouldn't consider myself an expert on back tension by any sense. I do know however when it feels like your having a hard time getting the shot to go off you should try to let down and start the shot sequence over.
Hope I helped.
Regards,
jon
 

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Hi,
Firts off I wouldn't consider myself an expert on back tension by any sense. I do know however when it feels like your having a hard time getting the shot to go off you should try to let down and start the shot sequence over.
Hope I helped.
Regards,
jon

Well said.
Some use the clicker to set the shot up before starting there back tension.

Its not the clicker. Like he said, let down.Relaxe and take some deep breaths in and out.And start again.
 

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Well said.
Some use the clicker to set the shot up before starting there back tension.

Its not the clicker. Like he said, let down.Relaxe and take some deep breaths in and out.And start again.
I have heard this also. They also refer to the clicker as preloading.
 

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As was just said, the clicker allows you to preload the release to the right place, at which time you can start pulling into the back wall to get the surprise release.

The clicker makes some people flinch because it is the indicator that the shot is about to go off. Well, not necessarily! Look at the click as an indicator of correct preload/rotation to get you to the point you can really use back tension instead of trying to predict how much more tension and rotation it is going to take to get to that point.

I had to take a file to my clicker ledge on my Scott Longhorn's cam to clean it up a little bit after a lot of use. The click was getting unreliable, and in order to be reliable, there needs to be a clean ledge for the sear to fall onto.

A lot of people hate the click. I say give it a try, but be sure that you don't start getting punchy. You have to use the click as a tool, not a timer.
 

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The difficulty in getting a hinged back-tension release to fire is often caused by improper hand position.

The click should be set at the point where you have equal tension on all fingers on the release. You draw with the pointer finger and a little bit of the middle finger. If you have a thumb peg, it is a good idea to wrap your thumb around it to help pull. If you have a 3 finger, you then equalize pressure on all fingers, with all fingers extended. If you have a 4 finger, the same concept but with all four fingers. It's at that point that you can relax your wrist to form a straight line from your elbow to the release, as if they were connected by a string. Now the click should go off. At this point, you use back-tension, and the release will easily go off.

Good luck!
 

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As was just said, the clicker allows you to preload the release to the right place, at which time you can start pulling into the back wall to get the surprise release.

The clicker makes some people flinch because it is the indicator that the shot is about to go off. Well, not necessarily! Look at the click as an indicator of correct preload/rotation to get you to the point you can really use back tension instead of trying to predict how much more tension and rotation it is going to take to get to that point.

I had to take a file to my clicker ledge on my Scott Longhorn's cam to clean it up a little bit after a lot of use. The click was getting unreliable, and in order to be reliable, there needs to be a clean ledge for the sear to fall onto.

A lot of people hate the click. I say give it a try, but be sure that you don't start getting punchy. You have to use the click as a tool, not a timer.

Well said!! The clicker is your friend, it tells you you are set up and ready to apply tension and then focus ALL attention on aiming. Most people that don't use the clicker are A: very experienced shooters and have scary fast releases or B: are using alot of rotation to set off the release. Both can work as long as it is asurprise release.

John
 

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Like others I always used the click to signal that it was time to begin back tension. Igt was my signal that I had drawn, settled in and relaxed properly. If it didn't click at that right point, something was wrong and it was time to let down...

Once the click came, it was all about aiming...
 

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Let it click, then practice waiting before the shot, maybe even let down after the click a few times, then it won't sneak up on you. I have recently learned that for me to get a clean smooth shot i have to relax my wrist.(forces the pressure into your back) a lot of people shoot these releases wrong by just rotating them- its an easy habit to get into. :pc:
 
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