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Do competitive compound archers using small, low-profile vanes on a small-diameter arrow for outdoor distances typically fletch them straight, or do they use a small amount of offset or helical to create spin? If so, what is the best jig? I've been struggling getting vanes to adhere fully to the shaft on when fletched at a 1 degree offset.
 

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I fletch my AAE vanes on my ACE's dead straight and dead centered on the shaft using a Bitz. I don't use helical or offset of any sort because I shoot very low poundage and need the least drag outdoors I can possibly get.
Keeping the vanes on the shafts long-term requires a fletching college degree, but is mostly doable. You have to hold your nose juuust exactly right when you prep the vanes and shafts. I use the AAE arrow wipes to clean the shafts (don't know what the chemical is but it is some kind of alcohol based solvent I think) and the AAE vane prepping pen on the contact surface of the vane (the chemical appears to be slightly diluted Acetone, so Qtip + acetone would probably be the same thing). Then I use a cyanoacrylate gel glue to glue them on (the Loctite stuff from the hardware store). Then a quick prayer and offering to Zeus and just hope they stay on for at least a while. So far so good, though I do eventually lose one or two here and there which is probably as good as you can get.

I have no idea how you would keep them on with offset or helical. That'd be above my pay grade to get that to work with vanes; I'd not even go down that rabbit hole and would just go small feathers or SpinWings if I had to do that.

lee.
 

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Do competitive compound archers using small, low-profile vanes on a small-diameter arrow for outdoor distances typically fletch them straight, or do they use a small amount of offset or helical to create spin? If so, what is the best jig? I've been struggling getting vanes to adhere fully to the shaft on when fletched at a 1 degree offset.
No competitive archer uses straight fletching. Actual scientific testing has proven it is inferior to offset or helical fletches, of which you only need from 1 to 2 degrees of offset.
The less perfect your arrows, the more important it is to have them spinning to average out any tendency to depart from a straight flightpath.

The best jig is the one that works for you at an appropriate cost. If you're finding it hard to get fletches to stick, start using the search function to get suggestions on what you're doing wrong.
It's been well covered here over the last decade and a bit.
I'd actually recommend covering anything about surface preparation you can find on the internet with regards to gluing things and how important it is.
 

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Shootin and Cussin
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I've had good luck with 1.75 bohning x vanes fletched with a small offset.
This is what I did. Arizona makes a 1 degree offset EZFletch. It does a great job with small vanes.
 

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Just my 2p, but isn't acetone a solvent for epoxy? In that case, wouldn't it be a bad call to use that on a laminated arrow shaft? I've used alcohol for prep, per glue specs which is usually a CA type.

I would also wager roughing the shaft surface very lightly would promote adhesion. I say this as my target arrows with blazers at a 3 helical have never budged.

It goes without saying, cleanliness is godliness here. Much like paint, the prep is more important then the application.

All this being said, I'm just a guy on a forum.

Ethan
 

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Acetone is a solvent for a few things, but it's extremely volatile ( which actually means "easily evaporated at normal temperatures") and so doesn't hang around long enough to do any damage in normal situations when it's being used for cleaning.
Other than that, you should treat it with caution. It's the most common chemical in my house that I have to use and not like.
People are a little too casual with it.
http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9927062
 

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As a sub note, I don't think many differences exist in fetching jigs, I think it's really a matter of quantity and thus speed. I have not used a single jig that has performed poorly.
 

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Only a solvent for uncured epoxy. Feel free to leave a cut off section of arrow in a CLOSED jar of it and see how it responds.
 

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Solvent swelling is a concern in your jar experiement. Acetone can swell cured epoxies, leading to weaker bonds. Not saying it's significant, especially for a spray on and we off, but I have had an arrow fail on release (no relation to acetone). One might say I have the fear of good when it comes to arrow shafts.

Once again, I'm just a guy on a forum, I'm not an expert but I can say there is an MSDS written by an expert somewhere that would have the acetone answer
 

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As a sub note, I don't think many differences exist in fetching jigs, I think it's really a matter of quantity and thus speed. I have not used a single jig that has performed poorly.
Heheh. The differences aren't so much in the jigs, but the operators.
Some jigs are far easier to adjust and use.
 
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