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Discussion Starter #1
As I said before I'm a relative newbie to "traditional" ( I hate to use THAT word, LOL) therefore I've been reading and studying this forum looking for suggestions and answers to my questions. Yes, MOST of my questions have been asked before, MANY times before. An archer who takes the time to use the search feature here will find a wealth of information and a crash course in traditional archery.

I've been shooting my recurve for a few weeks now and this is what I've learned so far.

1. I've made most of the newbie mistakes ya'll have seen over and over!

2. I really bought too much bow to start out with (50# @28",wanted one to hunt with:wink:) I tire after 40 shots or so,but more about that later.

3. The arrows I bought are way over-spined, used the wrong chart.

4. I like 3 fingers under, I get a much smoother release and am much more accurate than split finger.

5. My elevation is suprisingly good, windage is what gets me, release, anchor, arrow spine issues. form form form.

6. I can't make up my mind about an anchor point, keep going back and forth, I need to PICK ONE!

7. At 15 yards I'm plenty accurate to hunt but I'll NOT make that newbie mistake, consistent accuracy in the 20-25 yard range is what I'm after.

8. Practicing with the recurve has improved my compound accuracy!!! My concentration and release is MUCH better with the compound now.

9. I LOVE SHOOTING MY RECURVE, I love getting back to fingers on the string and being more connected to the shot.


Now for my question. As I said, I bought a 50# @ 28" recurve that I'm drawing to 29" after 40 arrows or so I'm really too tired to shoot with much form, I have an old round wheel compound (PSE Lazer Magnum), 50% break over, that suckers about 50" long, really. I'm practicing with it bare bow at 55#, holding 25-30. Is this valid practice? It seems to me that its not too much different than a 30# recurve would be.


now for no.
10. My old compound has a flipper rest and man do those arrows fly better than off the shelf of my recurve, gonna have to get a stick-on rest and try it!:eek:
 

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Form is form regardless of the bow used

The issues with using a compound to practice for a recurve are much different release feel, you usually have much different mass and a different grip with a compound which can be confusing in the switch over and change your accuracy.

(We won't even get into the length differences or sight picture)

A 30#-35# recurve can usually be had pretty cheaply and is worth the investment for a practice tool IMO but others may tell you otherwise.
 

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bcoulter -

I'll have to disagree with VM on this one. If the finger pinch on the old compound doesn't bother you then the compound is fine. The muscles used to "get over the hump" are slightly different than those used for holding at anchor, but the ones you are primarily concerned with are those at anchor. Further, a compound shot with fingers should be tuned extractly the same way as a recurve. Despite some different force vectors during the power stroke, the dominant forces on the arrow (the ones you have to worry about) are the same.

With the extra mass weight of the compound, don't be surprised if you start looking into short stabilizers for the recurve!

BTW - Remember, when compounds frist came out they were set up and shot exactly like stickbows!

Enjoy!

Viper1 out.
 

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I knew if I posted like that you would post exactly what you did Viper. This way he gets both sides of the coin. LOL (I am spending to much time here when I can almost write some fellows responses in my head before they even write it)
 

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VM -

LOL, me too!!! A lighter recurve would be "nicer" but can't see spending the extra $$$ when you already have something perfectly usable. :slice: :darkbeer:

Viper1 out.
 

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I have to agree w/bcoulter about the compound shooting improving. I don't feel comfortable enough to hunt with the recurve this year. I have noticed my shooting ability and concentration with the recurve have improved, though.
Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Viper1 said:
VM -

LOL, me too!!! A lighter recurve would be "nicer" but can't see spending the extra $$$ when you already have something perfectly usable. :slice: :darkbeer:

Viper1 out.

Thanks guys,

I agree, a 30# recurve would be best but it's a money thing, I'm still buying arrows trying to find the right ones for the recurve. At 50" or so finger pinch doesnt bother me w the compound. I hunted with this bow sucessfully for many years, fingers, no peep, just a site. I used split finger before but find that with "instinctive aiming" ;) three under works best for me. The compound is more comfortable right now for helping me find a good anchor etc etc.

Bill
 

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bcoulter, SCS -

One of the real problem with the high-tec compounds (IMHO), is that unless the shooter has had some real coaching, the CB does enough of the work for them, that is makes the "form" we find so critical, unnecessary. You can just "get away with" a lot of stuff on a CB you can't do on a stickbow.

Most of the CB "hunter" guys (who have been shooting "for years") I teach, get a real eye-openner in the first 15 minutes or so. Not only to they get to feel what a shot from a CB is supposed to feel like, for the first time, but their groups are usually halved in the first 1/2 hour.

Bill - As I said, the older compounds and their shooters didn't have the same affliction!

Viper1 out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
yep, I'm finding your exactly right. Even with fingers the compound is more forgiving of my release, it's much more critical on the recurve. Now when I shoot my new hunting compound I'm finding I "follow thru " much better than I did before, I hope that makes sense.

And yes, my compound groups are better now. Still not as FUN as the recurve tho......
 

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I agree with Viper there. I did a Bowhunter Safety Course this weekend and all but one were compound shooters. While they were able to keep decent accuracy, form and draw styles were ragged to say the least and after and hour of coaching/shooting everyone did much better on the proficiency test and some safety issues were resolved. To many folks draw their bow with it facing up and pulling it down to shooting level or they straight arm it wih the holding arm and do all the drawing with the back arm. You can get away with a straight arm draw with the let-off on a compound, but you really should be doing a push pull and should never have the arrow aimed up like that. A release breaks or grip slips and you launch an arrow into another zipcode!
 

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I can't see why anyone would draw that way. I've seen people shoot like that and it's the only way they can get the string back. BACK THE WEIGHT DOWN!! The big thing from the recurve to the compound is I don't feel I creek the string forward, now. Even going from fingers to a release, you learn to keep pulling into the wall instead of relaxing in the valley.
Steve
 

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Old round wheel componds make wonderful training aids. The mechanicly put you in a consistant draw length every time and let you know what a good shot feels like. Also the lack of hard stops is a good thing too so you learn consistant back pressure to keep it in the valley the same way every time. Keep shooting it and concentrate on the fundamentals.
 

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I have an old round wheel compound (PSE Lazer Magnum), 50% break over, that suckers about 50" long, really. I'm practicing with it bare bow at 55#, holding 25-30. Is this valid practice? It seems to me that its not too much different than a 30# recurve would be.


now for no.
10. My old compound has a flipper rest and man do those arrows fly better than off the shelf of my recurve, gonna have to get a stick-on rest and try it!
Oh ho!!! here comes my answer... All of you can duck and run now. :angel:


The answer is yes and no. Because of the shelving, the arrow position on a compound and Traditional bow are totally different. (thus the different spines between compounds, recurves, and longbows.)

There is a totally different feel of holding a traditional bow compared to a compound bow. And the release is totally different too..... finger vs release.

The mass is different too. Much more mass on the compound, thus a different feel.

Even if you use fingers to release with your compound, you have a different feel on your bow arm.

Will it work??? Yes to some extent.... Form *IS* FORM. But if you really want to become accurate and "precision" that form, you had better use a Traditional bow.

Dwayne
 

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No! Not again!

Dwayne and I are thinking alike. LOL
 

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Hello Vermonster,

To many folks draw their bow with it facing up and pulling it down to shooting level or they straight arm it wih the holding arm and do all the drawing with the back arm.
I cringe when I see this....and usually end up leaving the place.


Dwayne
 

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Hello Vermonster,

Dwayne and I are thinking alike. LOL
Great minds think alike...:smile:

Dwayne
 

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Discussion Starter #17
there are a bunch of great minds here!:D I agree Dwayne, there is a different feel between the two bows. The old compound is helping me to settle on my anchor, I've been experimenting with various anchor positions. My ability to draw and hold the recurve has improved already, at first I found I was snap shooting, now I can hold my anchor for a few seconds before releasing. I'm practicing with both for now.

Thanks guys, I've already learned a lot from this forum.
 

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Hello Bcoulter,

My ability to draw and hold the recurve has improved already, at first I found I was snap shooting, now I can hold my anchor for a few seconds before releasing. I'm practicing with both for now.
Snap shooting is extremely common for overbowed people. It's difficult to hold a bow back properly, take aim, and shoot with proper form...all while attempting to hold something back that makes your arms "rubbery".

Here is something to practice....

When you are shooting, do NOT release the FIRST time your sight picture says "release". But pick a number (lets say 3). This means, on the THIRD time your sight picture says release, you may release. Randomly pick a number between 1 and (lets say) 7.

This forces you to do a couple of things....

1. It keeps you from "snap shooting".
2. It instills the idea "just because you are on sight, doesn't meant you need to shoot."
3. It keeps you from pre-guessing? or releasing prematurely.
4. It helps prevent target panic...Snap shooting is a primary sign of target panic.

Dwayne

edit part: I said snap shooting is a primary sign of target panic. What I mean is: most all folks with target panic usually have a snap shot, or some kind of preliminary release of the arrow. This does NOT MEAN that *everyone* with a snap release has target panic!. But what I am saying, snap release tends to lead to target panic for many folks.
 
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