Archery Talk Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a question regarding training with a compound bow. I'm on a team that begins practice with 100 arrows at blank bale. I appreciate it for endurance, but I find the lack of anything to focus on frustrating.

Now, I know the main purpose of blank bale is to shoot without worrying about aiming, but I feel that my form is strongest and that it is easiest to focus on my shot as a whole when I have a goal (the target) in mind. (I love the instant feedback I get from arrow flight and where it landed ^^; )

I've tried aiming at the pre-existing holes in the bale, but that is hard to do because there are so many. I fall off one and I say in my head that I meant to do that, and I try to focus on another one. This is repeated a few times before I just give up and shoot. I've also tried writing letters with the arrows, which was okay, but I feel that while I was shooting, I forgave myself if the arrow wasn't exactly where I meant it to be, which is inexcusable for blank baling with a compound bow.

I guess my basic question is if anyone knows of any alternative shooting practice for compound bows that focuses on what makes compound bows different from recurve (the ability to hold longer, hold more steady, and higher precision) please tell me about that practice or link me to a site that has some ideas available.

Thanks for any and all help!

((Sorry about the wall of text, I just haven't had much luck looking around for this information.))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,236 Posts
I had a question regarding training with a compound bow. I'm on a team that begins practice with 100 arrows at blank bale. I appreciate it for endurance, but I find the lack of anything to focus on frustrating.
100 Seems like overkill to me , but [and Im not trying to be a smart guy here] maybe this exercise is the reason you are satisfied with your shooting form and execution at this point .

Some on this board will say blank bales serve no purpose , I disagree believing it to be a helping exercise to deal with target panic
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,738 Posts
The idea of blank bailing is not to shoot without worrying about aiming, but rather so that you can focus on your form and more importantly your shot execution...I think you would find the exercise much more rewarding if you stopped trying to shoot at something and put what appears to be considerable focus to work on perfecting your shot execution...

I will say 100 arrows seems like a lot to me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
100 Seems like overkill to me , but [and Im not trying to be a smart guy here] maybe this exercise is the reason you are satisfied with your shooting form and execution at this point .

Some on this board will say blank bales serve no purpose , I disagree believing it to be a helping exercise to deal with target panic
Side note: Shooting 100 arrows at the beginning of practice is actually very new. We just started doing that a few weeks ago. It is different from how we normally did things, so in trying to adjust to the new set up I'm looking for additional options and ideas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,642 Posts
The main purpose of blank bale shooting is to take your form to the subconscious level. To do that you have to focus on one part of your form during each blank bale shot.

Some examples are:
  • bow hand
  • release hand
  • release execution
  • shot conclusion
  • posture and balance

There are a lot of other things to work on at the blank bale. Your shot sequence is a good start for a list.

It takes a lot of repitition to take your form to the subconscious level and nearly as much repitition to keep it there. Why is this good? Because, the more of your form that operates subconsciously, the more likely you are to maintain your form during a shot when you are under pressure.

The idea is to shoot as good a shot as possible, but to focus your mind on only one thing at a time.

When you shoot blank bale, you want to do it with a purpose in mind.

If you are standing there and just flinging arrows at a bale, you are wasting your time and probably developing some bad habits.

100 arrows to start seems a little heavy, but when you understand that it takes several thousand repetitions to form a habit, it does help you develop subconscious form a lot faster.

Hope this helps,
Allen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,665 Posts
Side note: Shooting 100 arrows at the beginning of practice is actually very new. We just started doing that a few weeks ago. It is different from how we normally did things, so in trying to adjust to the new set up I'm looking for additional options and ideas.
Here's something you can do to work on your form, while blank bailing (at 10-15 yards).

First, sink an arrow in the middle of the bail. Next, come to full draw, and aim on your first nock. Then close your eyes, and slowly execute your shot, visualizing and imagining you are holding the pin steady on the first nock. With your eyes closed, you should also be concentrating on your form. After the shot, see where your arrow hits, the repeat... always aiming on your first nock.

The goal is not necessarily to hit the nock, but to properly execute your shot while holding at the same point where you began.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,316 Posts
I always tell my students that form is what makes you shoot good, blank bailing is how you work on form, and it is up to you how to balance shooting good with fun. Some spend a lot of time, others do not (well, only a very few spend the time).

For someone wanting to reach the upper levels of archery 100 isn't that large a number of arrows to blank bail. The lowest amount of arrows I know of an Olympic Archer shooting was around 35000 arrows and he reported around half of those "at the bail" (I don't know if that included aiming exercises at a large target or not). Some report well in excess of 50000 arrows a year and roughly half their time there too. And yes, they do know how many arrows they shoot, *all* arrows shot are logged into a notebook.

But, that is boring and few of us do it that much. I know I don't even much for an amateur, but then my interest in personal shooting ability is "play" - that is I shoot for fun, not to win. I'm more interested in the instruction/coaching end of things. If I blank bail 20 arrows a month I'm doing good.

From what you wrote I assume you have a coach, you ought to talk to them about it. You should also have goals in your blank bailing, they just will not be related to where your arrow lands.

For instance, I've always had a stiffer wrist and eventually grabbed at my bow after a shot. With a compound it wasn't that critical, I shot better than I ever thought I would when I first began so I never bothered to fix it. With my traditional recurve I shoot a high wrist so it is *supposed* to be stiff so no need to fix it there either. Then a few months back I picked up an Olympic Recurve and lo and behold that stiff wrist meant I was flinging arrows off target (unless I shot a stiff wrist too, but that had other issues when dealing with the clicker and sights - still had to fix things). So for a while I just blank bailed until I was tired (but not so tired I was making mistakes) and my goal was to have the bow fall freely with a relaxed wrist naturally doing that little "flip/push" thing I see many recurvers do with their bow hand. Having a goal made me concentrate and made it interesting. I shot my compound again a few days ago and jumped when the shot went off because (for the first time ever) the bow swung all the way down and seeing the bottom cam swing up made me react (I used to catch it about a quarter of the way down in the swing).

Though, in the end, you mostly have to decide if you want to continue this training or not. In either case talking it over with your coach is what needs to be done. I don't know what he/she is wanting you to work on (just "form" really isn't that specific, you really need a goal to work towards otherwise one typically ends up just flinging arrows with no focus) and what they are teaching the team with a focus on (that is, how competitive they are trying to be). It may be that you do not really fit with the team either, not everyone really wants to be competitive. Many think they do (we all like winning), but then when the reality of the work involved hits they find out they do not. I competed in shotgun and air pistol when I was a teen and at some point decided I didn't like that type of shooting (competitive that is - I enjoy shotgun and air pistol) - I just want to shoot not have every arrow be work.

Someone else out there is as good as you, has as good equipment, but is willing to have every arrow be work , therefore if you want to win then you have too also - only more so than them.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top