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Discussion Starter #1
So I have a '08 Diamond "The Rock" that I got off here and love it. The guy I got it from said it was still set at the factory settings as per the birth cert. and it's 71# draw. Soon after recieving it I cranked it down exactly one full turn on each limb bolt. I figured it was set somewhere between 64-67 lbs. Tonight, just for piece of mind I started cranking the bolts down to basically start over from scratch just to be sure because I never actually cranked them all the way down to begin with. I started cranking full expecting them to stop around one crank, however I've now cranked them down three full turns and decided to stop in case I strip them out. Shoudn't the bolts stop turning when they're all the way down? Or was I pulling back a lot less weight than I thought?
 

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I would say you are not cranked all the way down
If you were all the way down and you could still turn the bolts the damage is already done
But being this is the internet no one can say for sure
If you think something is wrong take it to a shop the only way to know for sure unless you can strip it down yourself

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think I may have actually been about a half a crank to 3/4 a crank away from all the way down. I cranked it again just for the hell of it and ot got a lot tighter. I didn't put all my back into it just in fear of not knowing if these bolts actually go all the way to the point where they stop. Now I un cranked it about 1 1/2 turns and it feels about normal again. I really need to get this thing on a scale.
 

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I cranked it again just for the hell of it and ot got a lot tighter. I didn't put all my back into it .
Don't put ANY back into it. Just a limb bolt, turning it in it should bottom out without any effort...from bottomed out to several turns out it should be equally as easy/hard to turn. Alot tighter shouldn't even be used as verbage, tighten till it's bottomed out, that enough...back out equal from there. Limb bolts should turn VERY easy.
 

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I bet you had it cranked down way to low and it's taking a lot of turns to get it Maxed out. They should stop turning when its Maxed out I'm pretty sure.
 

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Don't put ANY back into it. Just a limb bolt, turning it in it should bottom out without any effort...from bottomed out to several turns out it should be equally as easy/hard to turn. Alot tighter shouldn't even be used as verbage, tighten till it's bottomed out, that enough...back out equal from there. Limb bolts should turn VERY easy.
This exactly with any bow.
 

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While I agee that you shouldn't have to put any back into it, I take a different view on things. I know some of these guys have been around a long time, but my experience dates back almost 40 years with compound bows, and I've certainly had my share.

In my view that bow was not pulling as much weight as might have been thought. The only way to know for sure is with a scale. Pure and simple.

Also in my view, it is virtually impossible for a normal man with a common allen wrench to strip the threads out of a riser. When you crank the poundage up two things can happen. The limb bolts will stop either due to bottoming in the threaded hole or because the limbs bottom against the riser. In most cases it will be the latter. At this point the bow will be at it's maximum poundage which may or may not be the rated poundage due to some variances, but should be close.

I've seen it said that bows vary in how much they change in weight due to the thread count on the bolts. This is totally untrue. All limb bolts that I know of are 5/16 NC so they are all the same. What makes some bow change more than others is due to limb design, angle in relation to the riser, or where the pivot point is in the limb pocket. But to actually strip the threads on the bolt or the riser there can only be two scenerios. Either the bolt is undersized or the threaded hole in the riser is oversized in which case the threads themselves won't have enough surface area to hold. One other thing is that the bolt is crossthreaded ruining the threads in the riser--aluminum is softer than steel.

One thing that can make some bolts turn harder than others is lack of lubricant on the threads. Aluminum will gall to steel making it very hard to turn the bolts. Doesn't happen that often, but it does happen. In most cases bolts can be turned with some effort, but if you're using a normal allen wrench and they won't turn then either they are already bottomed or there is something else going on. Turn hard enough and usually you''ll bend or twist the allen wrench or round out the hole it fits into.

This is just my take on the subject. Hope I didn't get too far off topic.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah, I'm just guessing it wasn't pulling as much weight as previously thought. I'm not "wrenching" on the bolt or anything, not beyond super human or anything. The concern originally was that they didn't really give more resistance three turns into it, and not realizing it was un-cranked so much I was concerned I was doing damage.
I guess "putting my back into it" was misleading. Just regular arm strength.
 
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