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My area has plenty of yotes. I want to try and get rid of as many as possible this winter. I have an R-15 VTR and an ATN Gen 1 nightscope. Giving me an effective range of less than 100 yards. I'm thinking I'll be putting my electronic caller (rabbit distress) in the middle of a 5 acre oval field, and sitting in a treestand on either side of the field depending on the wind from 1-3am at night, and shooting anything that enters the field. I plan on only night hunting. Does this sound like a plausible strategy? I've only night hunted once and it was a half attempt, now I want to try and bag a few yotes this winter because my area is absolutely infested with them. Nobody hunts them, so they should be relatively easily fooled. Maybe I'll bring my bow out if it's a full moon too.

If my strategy doesn't sound good, what would you do or what have you done already that works?
 

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Good plan but it will more than likely only work once.
How do you figure? Another thing I was thinking was nailing down a road killed deer during the day and coming back at night and playing coyote sounds. Not sure about the legality of picking up roadkill in NYS though. Why do you think it will only work once? Hopefully because I'll kill the whole pack at once ;-)
 

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I wouldn't sit in a treestand. I hunt coyotes with a bow casually in the winter-ish months, and have found that you can often get them to come in a lot closer with less suspicion if you are hunkered down in a blowdown tree or brushpile or something of that nature. Maybe it is just me, but usually, when I have a coyote come in to a call, as I use mouth calls instead of an electronic, they are looking everywhere, literally everywhere, for the source of that noise. A rabbit-in-distress call seems more lifelike if it is coming from a brushpile with a yote deke facing towards it about 15-20 yards away than if it comes from 20 feet up in a tree. However, as you are using an AR, hunting at night, and using a e-caller, the tree idea just may work, although you will probably see better results if you are on the ground in natural cover. Got a bipod? Use it. Ghillie suit? Even better. Good luck, and, like zap said, make sure it is legal. JMHO.
 

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I wouldn't sit in a treestand. I hunt coyotes with a bow casually in the winter-ish months, and have found that you can often get them to come in a lot closer with less suspicion if you are hunkered down in a blowdown tree or brushpile or something of that nature. Maybe it is just me, but usually, when I have a coyote come in to a call, as I use mouth calls instead of an electronic, they are looking everywhere, literally everywhere, for the source of that noise. A rabbit-in-distress call seems more lifelike if it is coming from a brushpile with a yote deke facing towards it about 15-20 yards away than if it comes from 20 feet up in a tree. However, as you are using an AR, hunting at night, and using a e-caller, the tree idea just may work, although you will probably see better results if you are on the ground in natural cover. Got a bipod? Use it. Ghillie suit? Even better. Good luck, and, like zap said, make sure it is legal. JMHO.
I mentioned that I'd be putting the e-caller in the middle of the 5 acre field. So that would put about 100 yards from either of my two stands on each side. My thinking is that having them come into the middle of the field will leave them really isolated and open for a shot, and should they chose to circle first they are unlikely to smell me because I'll still be behind the area they'll be checking. Is a rabbit distress coming from the middle of a field unrealistic? Should I put it near the brush on the side of the field instead?

PS have you gotten any with a bow? That's impressive.
 

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Hound dogs and pickup trucks seem to keep the numbers in check around here.
 

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How do you figure? Another thing I was thinking was nailing down a road killed deer during the day and coming back at night and playing coyote sounds. Not sure about the legality of picking up roadkill in NYS though. Why do you think it will only work once? Hopefully because I'll kill the whole pack at once ;-)
First that sucks you had to register your assault weapon! I hope the reason it only works once is because you took them all out. I am no expert, just from my experience every time i call in a location my chances go down. Coyotes are very smart and remember things very well. Good luck to you, I bet the first time out you will have success. If you really want to thin them out trapping would be a better option.
 

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First that sucks you had to register your assault weapon! I hope the reason it only works once is because you took them all out. I am no expert, just from my experience every time i call in a location my chances go down. Coyotes are very smart and remember things very well. Good luck to you, I bet the first time out you will have success. If you really want to thin them out trapping would be a better option.
Hopefully! Thanks! I wouldn't want to trap because I'm only up at the cabin every other week at most and I would feel bad having trapped one and letting it die of the cold/dehydration
 

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My bow hunting strategy for coyotes is to leave the bow at home and use my rifle. Coyotes are a challenge, and I am not interested in not killing every single coyote that gets within 200 yards of me.

On a calm, quiet day a slight rustling of leaves and a mouse squeaker can be deadly. Most of the time I use a remote caller and setup accordingly to cover/wind and give each spot about 15-20 minutes after a calling sequence. I have much better luck by parking a long ways away from where I hunt and no talking at all.

If I hunt in the morning during the winter I won't call for the first 30-60 minutes of shooting light. This time of year they can be pretty active on their own. Play the wind and don't move...and don't miss.
 

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Might work..personally i find day calling for yotes to be more effective. If i were to hunt at night with the set-up you describe I'd bait with road kill then stake out the sight only after the coyotes have discovered and are actively feeding on the kill. I would not make any calls as this would up the odds of them detecting your presence. full moon with snow would be your best chance as gen 1 will be tough without it... also coyotes feed heavily on bait heavily in the early morning hours before daylight. best time to stake out is between 2:00am and daylight. definitely stake the roadkill down otherwise the yotes will drag it off into cover..
 

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I mentioned that I'd be putting the e-caller in the middle of the 5 acre field. So that would put about 100 yards from either of my two stands on each side. My thinking is that having them come into the middle of the field will leave them really isolated and open for a shot, and should they chose to circle first they are unlikely to smell me because I'll still be behind the area they'll be checking. Is a rabbit distress coming from the middle of a field unrealistic? Should I put it near the brush on the side of the field instead?

PS have you gotten any with a bow? That's impressive.
Okay, yeah, I guess that would work, now that I think about it. In regards to the treestand thing, depending on how far into the treeline the stands are, you could end up spooking a coyote or two, as a blob, even a well-camoflaged blob, is not that natural. Other than that, the only reason I hunt from the ground is a strange enjoyment I derive from being eye-level with my prey. Not for the challenge, per se, but there is something about it I enjoy. And yeah, I got three the year before last, each from various properties, using the technique I mentioned before. Never got pics though, as there are certain members, female, of course, of my family that dislike the idea of dead coyotes. Something about them being too similar to one dog we have or something like that, so any I kill have to be skinned out on sight.
 

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Good info on this forum, http://www.varminthunters.com/forum/index.php - I read that coyotes will want to come to the ecaller/decoy from down wind so plan that accordingly. I've missed one and wounded one that I've called in from a tree stand - not the best support for an accurate shot. Last March I was in a ladder stand with a shooting rail and called one in and got it with my AR15. I thought it was 100 yards and it turned out to be 160, thought the 3rd shot put it down for good. Climbed down, headed towards it, and it got up and ran. Finished it off but it took the rest of the clip (We can only carry one in the pipe and a 5 round mag).

Hunting yotes with an AR15 - that's about as exciting as it gets.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Good info on this forum, http://www.varminthunters.com/forum/index.php - I read that coyotes will want to come to the ecaller/decoy from down wind so plan that accordingly. I've missed one and wounded one that I've called in from a tree stand - not the best support for an accurate shot. Last March I was in a ladder stand with a shooting rail and called one in and got it with my AR15. I thought it was 100 yards and it turned out to be 160, thought the 3rd shot put it down for good. Climbed down, headed towards it, and it got up and ran. Finished it off but it took the rest of the clip (We can only carry one in the pipe and a 5 round mag).

Hunting yotes with an AR15 - that's about as exciting as it gets.
Same in NY. 5+1 only for hunting. Man I'm pretty excited!

Thanks for the tips folks.
 

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It's winter and the coyotes will come to a call at all times of the day. Put an obstacle to your back that they will not want to cross. Roadway, open creek, cattle fence, etc. They will try to circle around from where the distress call is coming from. If you see one at this time iof year there will be another close by. Hold off on shooting until you are sure another is not showing up. If you see more than one, shoot the furthest first. The nearest one will be focused on the call and will not see the farthest one drop. If you shoot the nearest first and the farhtest sees it drop, it will be gone in a flash.

One last thing, these things can be die hards. Literally. I tracked one that I shot with a .308 from 30 yards hit it through both lungs. The yote took off leaving frothy blood on both sides of the snowy trail. I tracked it for 200 yards until it got into an area to thick for me to follow, and never found it. I am sure it got into a den somewhere and expired.

Good hunting.

Andrew
 

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I arrowed my 25th yote two weeks ago. I simply LOVE to bowhunt them. Send me a PM and I'll send you an article I wrote on calling predators into bow range. I've been very lucky with them over the years and don't have all the answers, but I can provide some things that have worked for me.
 

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Same in NY. 5+1 only for hunting. Man I'm pretty excited!
Emptying the clip on a coyote trying to get away will definitely get the heart pumping.

Taking 25 yotes with a bow takes a lot more skill than I've got . . .
 

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My area has plenty of yotes. I want to try and get rid of as many as possible this winter. I have an R-15 VTR and an ATN Gen 1 nightscope. Giving me an effective range of less than 100 yards. I'm thinking I'll be putting my electronic caller (rabbit distress) in the middle of a 5 acre oval field, and sitting in a treestand on either side of the field depending on the wind from 1-3am at night, and shooting anything that enters the field. I plan on only night hunting. Does this sound like a plausible strategy? I've only night hunted once and it was a half attempt, now I want to try and bag a few yotes this winter because my area is absolutely infested with them. Nobody hunts them, so they should be relatively easily fooled. Maybe I'll bring my bow out if it's a full moon too.

If my strategy doesn't sound good, what would you do or what have you done already that works?
When I hunt yotes I use a Ar15 or a shotgun for close range work, I've dispatched yotes at 6 yards before! Focus on areas that hold small game, birds, mice, and vermin. CRP fields, brushy creek- or riverbottoms, swamps and marshes, and young clear-cuts are all excellent choices. Most farmers will gladly give you permission to hunt. Pinpoint your spots by looking for tracks and listening for barks, yips, and howls at dawn and dusk. The ideal conditions for a hunt are cold, calm days. Windy days are the worst.

Stealth is the first priority: no slamming vehicle doors or talking to your partner. Settle into a comfortable shooting position on a knoll or field edge that offers good visibility, and wait five to 15 minutes before calling.

Coyotes have extremely keen eyesight and, like any animal coming to a call, are looking hard for its source. Make sure your camo is good and that your hands and face are covered. A cushion to sit on helps you keep still. I'd highly recommend a Ghillie suit, I wear one and it works great!

If no coyotes come to your calls, sneak back out and drive to another area at least a half mile away, and repeat the process. You should be able to cover eight to 10 good spots in a day of hunting.

You don't need much to start, and you may already have it

Mouth-operated rabbit squealers are a must, but don't rely on them alone. Also use other distress calls and coyote howlers.

Decoys. These act as a closer to your calls. One of your kid's beat-up stuffed animals can suffice, though battery-run motion dekes work best. Flat-shooting rifles in .223 caliber work best in open terrain, but your deer rifle will do the trick. Shot-guns rule in thick timber or on night hunts (where legal). If you hunt turkeys, you probably already own the right setup: a tight-choked 12-gauge that throws a dense pattern out to 35 yards. Use No. 4 buckshot in magnum loads.

Wind is key, but other factors can help put the odds in your favor

Patience: Most coyotes respond to calls quickly, but they can take their time. Call for at least 20 minutes before moving on.

Calling: Put some emotion into your distress calls for realism. Coyotes are very territorial, and calls that imitate their howls work great at this time of year.

Stealth: Approach from down-wind, and use cover. An obstacle (road, field) at your back prevents incoming coyotes from circling downwind.
 

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I've had good luck baiting. I found that if you nail a deer hide to a tree, they keep coming back for it. ( as well as other critters)











 
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