Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,084 Posts
With all apologies to Mr. Mowry, I’ll continue to use the lethal management method, if for no other reason than I just like killing them.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,173 Posts
It's interesting how far the transients travel while looking for a territory. And it's probably safe to assume that the younger animals are more aggressive hunters than established pairs due to both age and meal opportunities available while in unfamiliar area's. This might have something to do with the type of yote that eats deer year round rather than mostly at fawning.
It's been known for a long time that they have the ability to increase litter size based on population (litter size increases if they are under populated, decreases if they are at carrying capacity). Having them shift their diet to mainly deer rather than rats and mice could be a bad addition to their habits (for us and the deer anyway).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
Maybe I am just dummying this down too much...but the size of the deer have to play a role in this. Where I hunt in Central Florida, there is no season whatsoever for coyotes and we shoot every single one we see. I would say I have only seen one ever bigger than 30 lbs. I don't think its that unrealistic for a 30 lb. coyote (or two 30 lb coyotes) to take down a mature doe or young buck here in Florida. You are talking deer that are less than 100 lbs. Now compare that to other states where whitetails add a significant more amount of body mass...would a coyote rather mess with a rabbit or a 150 lb.+ deer? I mean common sense just tells me small deer in the SE would make it to the dinner table easier than in other regions.
 

·
Huntoholic
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
I don't know often coyotes attempt to take adult deer, but I have seen fawns running for their lives on more than one occasion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,189 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Fawn mortality due to coyotes in GA is estimated at 30%, and they can take down small deer when there are 2-3 of them...and they will pack hunt...not sure how often that happens though...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,084 Posts
I’d like to know their effect on the turkey population, too. I called one up last Saturday hunting. The turkey population where I hunt them is way down from 10-15 years ago, and the coyotes seem to be everywhere.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,189 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I think that the raccoons and opossums are harder on the turkeys, and lack of burning the underbrush in GA which is needed for the nesting...but I bet that the coyote is a factor as you suspect...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,997 Posts
Fawn mortality in some parts of alabama is 80%. Trapping is probably much more effective that trying to shoot coyotes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
I live where the deer are larger than in Florida and the yotes seem to be proportionate in size, they have seem to have grown bigger over the years. Some nights I will go outside and hear groups howling and yelping in all directions of the compass. We cant shoot them fast enough up here.
 

·
Huntoholic
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Fawn mortality in some parts of alabama is 80%. Trapping is probably much more effective that trying to shoot coyotes.
I think you are right on the trapping, a guy at our camp can catch more in a week than I can call and kill in a year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,189 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
The problem is that no method really eradicates them...they just reintroduce themselves and increase their ability to reproduce...
 

·
}-Passin'Thru->
Joined
·
1,272 Posts
I don't know often coyotes attempt to take adult deer, but I have seen fawns running for their lives on more than one occasion.
Can't speak for southern coyote exposure, but we have a large population that reside on state forest lands. Solo mature coyotes do pursue adult deer in PA and in one such instance an adult female chased a healthy 2 year old buck right past of me. She died, via muzzy 4 blade from a Summit treestand.

A year later in the same only a couple miles away, I passed an arrow through a large doe. It was getting dark and she had ran out of sight. I returned 4 hours later and found her 60 yards from the arrows location, but in pieces. A hind was over there, no shoulders, just a spine and head connected to the rib cage. The stomach and lower intestine were the only things they didn't eat. I'm certain that was the whole pack that had found her.

Coyotes can get fairly large here in short order. It's cold in the winter and they aren't shy when packing on the pounds. As equal opportunity consumers, they do a considerable amount of damage on the turkey population as well. Domestic livestock are also targets of opportunity, even calves found partially consumed isn't that uncommon.

An attack on a local woman was recently reported in a small town not more than an hour from my hunts - http://triblive.com/local/regional/13442892-74/police-brookville-woman-mauled-by-coyote-left-drenched-in-blood

Needless to say, the coyote is less likely to receive the popular vote in the central PA region.

A big male boldly kinda challenged my old Model 94 this past deer season... and lost -

Img_6058_small.jpg

Shoot 'em all - they make nice hats.
 

·
Huntoholic
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
That's a big dog! People don't realize it doesn't take a very big dog, domestic or otherwise, to be more than you can handle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
I am sure you have heard of the 3 S's
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
Coyotes have become a bigger problem in residential areas here in the Tampa Bay area lately than they have on the ranch I hunt. It's actually become a big enough problem that local governments are now trying to figure out the best way to eliminate them. Residents are upset about their house cats and yorkies being snatched from their backyards, meanwhile they are fired up about the government exterminating wildlife. I personally think they should live trap them (so then no one can sue for their pet being killed) and then go kill them out of the public eye. My uncle lives in Dallas and was having issues with them in his neighborhood as well. While coyotes may be aggressive, they were no match for my uncle's rottweiler.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top