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All I know is I aim, pull, harvest. Last buck I took with the Xbow, the arrow zipped through it so fast it barely
flinched, took a couple steps and fell over dead. The arrow was buried completely in the ground.
Whatever it hits, it destroys!
 

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I shot the compound bow and hit 3 deer in the lung area and the arrow just stuck in the deer and never found any of them. :cry: I end up buying a crossbow and shot a 8 point buck and a doe. Both deer hit in the lung area and I had 2 pass threws and found both deer with no problem at all. :darkbeer: The crossbow had over twice the KE then the compound bow. :) I sold the compound bow. :wav: I don't have any problemns with the crossbow. I'm looking forward to killing more deer. I'm staying with the crossbow and I'm not looking back.
 

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What the "non- bolt shooters" don't realise is the weight and speed we are carring. With those #'s up the KE is off the chart. Complete pass thru every time even thru shoulder. Never lost a deer with the crossbow. Most run under 75 yds and wait on their ride to the barn.:cheers:

What this report does not include is the TRACKING ability of the hunters........
 

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It does emphasize the different results attained by experienced hunters. Those who shot most deer had fewer losses. Knowing the limitations of your gear is key to clean kills.
This is said after watching my neighbor's kid wound a (walking) deer at 20 yards.
 

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Tenpoint, define "lung area." I agree the x-bow puts the hammer down on them, but if you hit a deer with almost anything "in the lung area" they're going down. I would have to call your shot placement into question on that one and not the equipment. Just my perspective.
 

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The majority of bow hunters that I know do not sharpen their broadheads after target shooting. IMO, even a marginal hit with a razor sharp arrow results in quick bleed out. Broadheads that are not sharpened to a razor edge will result in less penetration and significantly less bleeding.

edge.
 

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i can't prove it, but many regular Bow hunters use too light of arrow/BH set-up fer the speed & trajectory. they try to reach out there like its a ML. 60 to 80 yds. i like them close less then 40 yds and then pick my shot. if not today then they will come into my range tomorrow or the next day. no matter i wait til its right fer my shot
 

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crossbow

im still new to the crossbow,and last night had a doe beat me at 20 yards.she was jacked up after smelling me,but never thought she could spin that fast.the speed of sound travels fast and so does the deer.clen miss,couldnt believbe it,
 

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This study says nothing about compound bows verses crossbows. If I read it correctly, 5 out of 100+ participants shooting crossbows is barely statistically significant for trying to compare groups.

I was one of the founding members of a group in Northern Virgina (SWMNV) that puts bowhunters on very small private properties for population control. These guys hunt year round under kill permits from the game department. They are run through much tighter qualifications than the local area military bases like Indian head. This group keep very good statistics with every hunter reporting every hunt. They have a recovery rate greater than 90%. Because of the sensitive nature of the areas they hunt and the small property sizes in the suburbs (5-15 acres typically), they limit themselves to 20 yard broadside or slightly quartering away shots.

Several years ago, I lobbied the governing committee to allow crossbows and they agreed. I watched individuals in that group that switched multiply their harvests by a factor of 4 or better while improving their recovery rate.

Granted, these are very experienced bowhunters and I would not expect the same proficiency from a gun hunter who picks up a crossbow to extend his season. However, in the hands of an experienced bowhunter, a crossbow can be a much more effective tool than a compound. The crossbow hunters in this group are all very aware of the string jumping issue and do all they can to quiet their crossbows as well as limiting their shots to calm still animals. I attributed the increased proficiency largely to the fact that you do not need to draw in the presence of game.
 

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I agree Yoder

"However, in the hands of an experienced bowhunter, a crossbow can be a much more effective tool than a compound."

Exactly how I feel. It will be tough for a gun hunter to just pick up the crossbow and just head out and be proficient without putting in some time to learn the woodsmanship of the bowhunter...
 

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Totaly agree with the lack of movement. When I started crossbow hunting, my sucess rate trippled. Not becouse I was a bad shot it was due to the NOT GETTING BUSTED while trying to position for the shot. I am as confident with Parker at 30 yards as I am my Weatherby at 300 on a bench.
 

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I have my own study on crossbows. I shot 2 deer , 1 at 23 yards and 1 at 15 yards broad side and I had 100% pass threws and 100% recovery. Both deer went less then 75 yards from being shot. We should have are own study on are crossbow hunters on here.
 

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This study says nothing about compound bows verses crossbows. If I read it correctly, 5 out of 100+ participants shooting crossbows is barely statistically significant for trying to compare groups.

I was one of the founding members of a group in Northern Virgina (SWMNV) that puts bowhunters on very small private properties for population control. These guys hunt year round under kill permits from the game department. They are run through much tighter qualifications than the local area military bases like Indian head. This group keep very good statistics with every hunter reporting every hunt. They have a recovery rate greater than 90%. Because of the sensitive nature of the areas they hunt and the small property sizes in the suburbs (5-15 acres typically), they limit themselves to 20 yard broadside or slightly quartering away shots.

Several years ago, I lobbied the governing committee to allow crossbows and they agreed. I watched individuals in that group that switched multiply their harvests by a factor of 4 or better while improving their recovery rate.

Granted, these are very experienced bowhunters and I would not expect the same proficiency from a gun hunter who picks up a crossbow to extend his season. However, in the hands of an experienced bowhunter, a crossbow can be a much more effective tool than a compound. The crossbow hunters in this group are all very aware of the string jumping issue and do all they can to quiet their crossbows as well as limiting their shots to calm still animals. I attributed the increased proficiency largely to the fact that you do not need to draw in the presence of game.
While for every 2 shots taken by each compound bowhunter each crossbow hunter took 3, on average, I agree with your assessment that more statistically significant sampling is required.

Maryland DNR has been taking some stats on crossbow kills for several years now and may well be in a position to augment the Indian Head report, when it comes to success, but not in wounding rates.
 

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Wounding Rate Study

I did a search on AT, and found this thread. As the principal author of the Study, I'd like to respond to some of the above comments. Some background: "White-tailed deer wounding rates with modern archery equipment" was peer-refereed, presented at the 2008 Southeastern Fish and Wildlife Agencies Meeting and the 2009 Southeast Deer Study Group meeting in Roanoke, VA, and published accordingly.

I think a great question is what percentage of unrecovered deer died within 24 hours.
We knew that some wounded deer on Indian Head survived, and that buzzards would sometimes point out deer that did not survive. While it is a great question, there was no way we could (economically or feasibly) determine the percentage of wounded deer that die and are not recovered by bowhunters. The few published research studies on the mortality of wounded deer showed that most unrecovered deer survive arrow wounding.
There are no end to anecdotal reports from hunters/outfitters that use blood-trailing dogs to recover wounded deer that otherwise would have likely been lost. However, it would difficult to draw any conclusions from these stories - what if the dog tracker only accepts tracking jobs with a reasonable chance for success (as recommended by John Jeanneney in his training guide, "Tracking Dogs for Finding Wounded Deer")?

What this report does not include is the TRACKING ability of the hunters........
I am not sure how you would qualify that - I am open to suggestions. The report does note that "experienced" volunteer trackers were available (I am one of the volunteers), and that dogs were not used.


This study says nothing about compound bows verses crossbows. If I read it correctly, 5 out of 100+ participants shooting crossbows is barely statistically significant for trying to compare groups.
I do understand your point on the sample size. However, three of the four University Wildlife Professors who refereed the Study and I would disagree with your statement. The fourth Professor commented that the crossbow and compound bow user data should be combined because there were only 5 crossbow users in the Study.
Although the number of crossbow users was small, note that they did recover a significant number of deer. I felt it was important to get this information into print, as this is the only published data that examines the difference in performance between crossbow and compound bow users with all other factors essentially equal. I now have three more years of data at Indian Head since I wrote the Study. As more hunters elect to use crossbows, we will cross that magic threshold of "8" (I had a statistics professor who once cautioned us to be wary of saying anything with a sample size of less than 8, lol). (And yes, experience does matter - I am familiar with and not surprised with Suburban Whitetail Management of Northern Virginia's outstanding performance).

Maryland DNR has been taking some stats on crossbow kills for several years now and may well be in a position to augment the Indian Head report, when it comes to success, but not in wounding rates.
I am not sure how MD DNR could augment the Whitetail Deer Wounding Rate Study. (MD DNR did provide me comments on the draft). I will probably do a update to the Study in four or five years. The harvest data Maryland collects does not reflect hunter accuracy, hunter recovery rate, nor amount of hunter effort.

-Andy Pedersen, aka "fsh"
 

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Did I miss something?

No traditional equipment (recurves/longbows)?
 

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No traditional equipment (recurves/longbows)?
Traditional archery equipment users were not included in the Indian Head Study because I had no data. No bowhunter had ever passed the annual pre-season shooter qualification test with traditional equipment, though only a few individuals have ever tried (I do mention this in the Study).
 

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Maryland DNR has been taking some stats on crossbow kills for several years now and may well be in a position to augment the Indian Head report, when it comes to success, but not in wounding rates.

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I am not sure how MD DNR could augment the Whitetail Deer Wounding Rate Study. (MD DNR did provide me comments on the draft). I will probably do a update to the Study in four or five years. The harvest data Maryland collects does not reflect hunter accuracy, hunter recovery rate, nor amount of hunter effort.

-Andy Pedersen, aka "fsh"
You could ask Maryland to ask more questions over the next 4-5 years :)
Success is in how you define it. You could also talk to Phil Norman in Howard county department of parks and recreation and review the stats being taken, if you have not already done so.
 
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