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Discussion Starter #1
what are the advantages of have a d-loop below the nock of the arrow?
 

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what are the advantages of have a d-loop below the nock of the arrow?
I assume you're referring to a "torqueless" loop (or similar), in which case it can serve to reduces/eliminate the twist applied to the bowstring when the archer rotates the hook/jaw on the release to a different plane than the bowstring/loop.
2nd possible advantage is lowering the anchor/pull angle for a more steady hold.

George Ryals (GRIV) has plenty of info on the former, and Nathan Brooks talked about the latter recently on his FB.

IMO, all of the supposed advantages of a "torqueless" loop can be addressed via other equally effective and more conventional means, and that seems to be supported in tournament results/records.
 

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I don't do that but I've heard it forces downward pressure on the arrow to stay on the rest better and pulling more from the center of the string.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I assume you're referring to a "torqueless" loop (or similar), in which case it can serve to reduces/eliminate the twist applied to the bowstring when the archer rotates the hook/jaw on the release to a different plane than the bowstring/loop.
2nd possible advantage is lowering the anchor/pull angle for a more steady hold.

George Ryals (GRIV) has plenty of info on the former, and Nathan Brooks talked about the latter recently on his FB.

IMO, all of the supposed advantages of a "torqueless" loop can be addressed via other equally effective and more conventional means, and that seems to be supported in tournament results/records.
i'm looking to get a new stan release later this year
View attachment 6357109
and thought about switching up the d-loop also because the one in the pic is an open design
 
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