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Discussion Starter #1
Hello there.

I consider getting a compound bow, but a pal told me that my arrows are for recurve and not for compound.
What's the difference?

Cheers.
 

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(aka lug nut)
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Hello there.

I consider getting a compound bow, but a pal told me that my arrows are for recurve and not for compound.
What's the difference?

Cheers.
If you have a 20 lb recurve bow, the arrows that will work for the 20 lb recurve bow are super skinny, and very very flexible.
If the compound bow you intend to use, cuz there are pulleys, the compound bow might be 40 lb or 50 lbs in draw weight, so the compound arrows need to be much FATTER in diameter, so therefore more stiff than the recurve arrows.
 

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Shootin and Cussin
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If you have a 20 lb recurve bow, the arrows that will work for the 20 lb recurve bow are super skinny, and very very flexible.
If the compound bow you intend to use, cuz there are pulleys, the compound bow might be 40 lb or 50 lbs in draw weight, so the compound arrows need to be much FATTER in diameter, so therefore more stiff than the recurve arrows.
Seriously Alan? So I can't shoot X10s on a recurve and X10s on a compound? Geeze.

OP, it is all to do with the spine of the arrow, the draw weight and draw length of both the recurve and the points used for each bow. Give us that info and we'll get started.
 

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C:\My Documents\My Pictur
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Hello there.

I consider getting a compound bow, but a pal told me that my arrows are for recurve and not for compound.
What's the difference?

Cheers.
===================

Hello
No training wheels :grin:
Cheers [ Later
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Seriously Alan? So I can't shoot X10s on a recurve and X10s on a compound? Geeze.

OP, it is all to do with the spine of the arrow, the draw weight and draw length of both the recurve and the points used for each bow. Give us that info and we'll get started.
My recurve is 34# and I will probably end on 40-45# on the compound. I don't have the need for max power.
My current arrows are spine 500 (Carbon Express Maxima Recurve RZ).
I've calculated my draw length to 27".
I honestly don't know what my points are. I assume you mean the tip? I bought my arrows used and got some with a light tip for outdoor use and some slightly heavier for indoors.

I'm aware that spine is an important factor, and this pal told me that I could probably just put some heavier points on for a heavier draw weight, but since my arrows are for recurve I shouldn't use them.
 

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It's difficult to guess why your friend may have said that about your arrows, perhaps the spine you have just wouldn't be suited for the increased energy of a compound; perhaps whatever vanes/fletching used aren't durable enough for the increased speed; without knowing all the details of the arrows in question and an idea of what you plan to shoot draw weight and length wise in a compound, it's all just speculation.

From one of your comments from above though, you do not add heavier points to a shaft to make it suitable for heavier draw weights; this is actually opposite of what you need. All else being equal, adding weight to the point causes the shaft to flex more when launched, just as when all else is equal increasing draw weight causes the shaft to flex more; by adding both point and draw weight, you're adding more flex on top of more flex, and could end up with a shaft failure.
 

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My recurve is 34# and I will probably end on 40-45# on the compound. I don't have the need for max power.
My current arrows are spine 500 (Carbon Express Maxima Recurve RZ).
I've calculated my draw length to 27".
I honestly don't know what my points are. I assume you mean the tip? I bought my arrows used and got some with a light tip for outdoor use and some slightly heavier for indoors.

I'm aware that spine is an important factor, and this pal told me that I could probably just put some heavier points on for a heavier draw weight, but since my arrows are for recurve I shouldn't use them.
Not trying to be rude, but your friends last comment, I wouldn't be taking any of his advice. He is totally wrong about adding weight.
 

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The Impartial Archer
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Your friend probably told you that because he looked at them and has more info than you are giving us.........lol. Arrows are arrows.....period. There is no such thing as a compound arrow or recurve arrow......just arrows.

It's ALL about proper spine for the draw weight and arrow length. What is "probably" going on is you have arrows spined for a low(er) weight recurve that aren't a good fit for the compound you also have or want and he looked at that and saw it.

Now you have confused what he told you or don't understand fully. OR maybe your friend is wrong but we can't really say.....too little info.

Hey tires are tires too.......but they still have to fit your rims and vehicle and that's why they make more than one tire. That's also why they make more than one arrow.
 

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My recurve is 34# and I will probably end on 40-45# on the compound. I don't have the need for max power.
Nah, get a usual 50-60lbs compound and set it to 50, you don't need lower poundage. You'll get to draw it within couple days and holding weight will be around 15-17lbs, you won't feel it at all.
 

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Shootin and Cussin
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(1) Don't let someone else you what pound bow you need. (2) go and shoot different poundage range bows (40-50, 50-60, etc and may your own mind up with what you would be comfortable with shoot. (3) a bow with limbs maxed out will perform better that a bow who's limbs are set on minimum poundage.

If your draw is 27" and your shoot in the 40ish pound range, the 500 spine arrows ought to work for a compound.
 

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Shootin and Cussin
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(1) Don't let someone else you what pound bow you need. (2) go and shoot different poundage range bows (40-50, 50-60, etc and may your own mind up with what you would be comfortable with shoot. (3) a bow with limbs maxed out will perform better that a bow who's limbs are set on minimum poundage.

If your draw is 27" and your shoot in the 40ish pound range, the 500 spine arrows ought to work for a compound.
I don't buy into that thought process any longer. 15-20 years ago it was true. Now, not so much.
 

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Back Yard Champion
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If your draw is 27" and your shoot in the 40ish pound range, the 500 spine arrows ought to work for a compound.
I've used .500" spine with 28 1/2" draw and 52 and 53 pounds. Accuracy great. My draw length and 55 pounds gives weakness of spine.
 

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Your friend probably told you that because he looked at them and has more info than you are giving us.........lol. Arrows are arrows.....period. There is no such thing as a compound arrow or recurve arrow......just arrows.

It's ALL about proper spine for the draw weight and arrow length. What is "probably" going on is you have arrows spined for a low(er) weight recurve that aren't a good fit for the compound you also have or want and he looked at that and saw it.

Now you have confused what he told you or don't understand fully. OR maybe your friend is wrong but we can't really say.....too little info.

Hey tires are tires too.......but they still have to fit your rims and vehicle and that's why they make more than one tire. That's also why they make more than one arrow.
This was kinda what I was trying to figure out.
And I think you're right that I may have misunderstood something he said. I don't have so much knowledge about the technical aspects of archery yet, but I'm trying.
Thank you :)


Nah, get a usual 50-60lbs compound and set it to 50, you don't need lower poundage. You'll get to draw it within couple days and holding weight will be around 15-17lbs, you won't feel it at all.
I know what you're saying, but I'm not consistent in my archery training. I do it for fun, mostly 3D shooting trips when the weather is good. I just want to know a little bit about what I'm doing with my equipment, hence my arrow question since that's the part about archery I have the hardest to understand.



If your draw is 27" and your shoot in the 40ish pound range, the 500 spine arrows ought to work for a compound.
The safe thing to do would probably be to bring my arrows with me to the shop when I choose to invest in a compound. If there's a chance I can use these arrows then I might as well do that. Thank you.


I've used .500" spine with 28 1/2" draw and 52 and 53 pounds. Accuracy great. My draw length and 55 pounds gives weakness of spine.
Does weakness of spine come with safety issues?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
17 more posts OP.......:confused:
Well... I was actually curious because I find it unnecessary to sell my current arrows if I can use them.
Also, I'm not going to flood the forum with unnecessary posts to reach my quota, except for this comment.
Have a nice day there.

Hey, he asked a legitimate question. Good on him for that.
Thank you.
 

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(aka lug nut)
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Well... I was actually curious because I find it unnecessary to sell my current arrows if I can use them.
Also, I'm not going to flood the forum with unnecessary posts to reach my quota, except for this comment.
Have a nice day there.


Thank you.
nilsson. Ignore SHpoet...he can't read very well. Your 500 spine arrows, IF the carbon tube is 27-inches long, will work nicely with a beginner compound bow at 55 lbs,
if you have a 100 grain screw in field point. If the carbon tube is 28-inches long (black part of the arrow), and you have a 100 grain screw in field point, your "recurve" arrows
will work nicely with a beginner compound bow at 52 lbs of draw weight.

By beginner compound bow, I'm talking about the Diamond Infinite Edge Pro. Lots of adjustment for draw length, and lots of adjustment for draw length.

PS. The Easton X10 arrows that SHPoet is referring to. These are $700 a dozen arrows. $250 for the tungsten points, and $450 for the carbon/aluminum tubes. Recurve folks (really high level ones) shoot the skinnier X10 arrows,
and compound bow folks shoot the larger diameter X10s. So, recurve arrows are skinnier, to handle lower draw weight at full draw, and compound arrows are larger diameter cuz most compound folks shoot more draw weight than recurve folks. 500 spine refers to 0.500 inches, meaning that your arrows BEND 0.500 inches in the arrow stiffness testing machine. All arrows are tested with the same test weight, and the supports the same distance apart. The more draw weight you use on the compound bow, the stiffer the arrow needs to get, like say a 400 spine arrow (bends less at 0.400 inches), or even a 340 spine arrow (bends even less at 0.340 inches).

Your 500 spine arrows will work just fine, for a beginner compound bow set at the low 50-ish pounds range, like 52 lbs or so. You can play with point weight, if your arrows are using screw in field points, to see what point weight gives you the best accuracy.
 

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just we are all on the same page,....the OP doesn't state what arrows he is using with his recurve. his buddy may be absolutely right. recurve arrows can be carbon,....recurve arrows can be aluminum,...recurve arrows can be wood,....recurve arrows can be fiberglass,....the later two being a no-no in a compound. with just about any arrow, one for a recurve will have a softer spine than the same arrow for a compound. if aluminum or carbon, they can be shot in a compound, but the recurve arrows will be muck softer than they should be.
 
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