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Discussion Starter #1
First, I apologize if there are other threads out there on this topic that I did not see. :) I am fairly new to archery and bow hunting, so I'm still learning a lot. Why do people have a different bow for 3D vs. Targets vs. Hunting, etc? Why can't the same bow be used for all three?
 

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Moxie Antigen. Hoyt Carbon Spyder.
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The same bow can be used for all three... but where's the fun in that! Many archers are also gear guys that love to play w/ different toys.
 

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Exactly what is above. And, if your primary focus is hunting, it would be to your benefit to use the same bow for everything. Maintaining that shot-consistency throughout the year, in preparation for hunting, is paramount. My thoughts and worth exactly as much as paid.
 

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The same bow can be used for all three types of hunting, usually a 35-37" ATA bow would fit the bill nicely. I would personally use a Prime Centergy Hybrid LD (35" ATA 7" brace height) or a PSE Evolve 35 but I have a 31" draw length and prefer accuracy over speed (I get a lot of speed thru my longer draw), If I had a small draw length I would probably go for something faster for 3D and hunting. My wife uses a Xpedition 6" brace SD cam for hunting and 3d (little hump in the draw and stiff to draw), but she has an old Hoyt target bow with cam and a half cams that she loves for known 3D and target that is smooth as silk, it's 37" ATA.
A shorter brace height will give you 10 feet per second faster because the power stroke is an inch longer. A longer brace height is usually a little more forgiving but slower. Same can be said for ATA length. Short is faster and a little less forgiving.
Some people like to have a bling bow with bright colors for 3D and target, and a camo bow for hunting!
Your draw length has a lot to do with how the ATA length of a bow feels mostly due to string angle at full draw. I like to have my string just barely tickle the front of my nose at full draw, I can't do that with most bows under 34", but everybody is different. If I shot a 28" ATA bow my peep would be way far away, I would have to use a very large peep, and my string would not touch my nose, but I would be plenty accurate out of a tree stand for deer. Hope this helps you!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Exactly what is above. And, if your primary focus is hunting, it would be to your benefit to use the same bow for everything. Maintaining that shot-consistency throughout the year, in preparation for hunting, is paramount. My thoughts and worth exactly as much as paid.
I do primarily have it to hunt. We've talked about joining a league, so I wanted to make sure I wouldn't be the [email protected] who shot league with her hunting bow. Lol This makes a lot of sense to me. Thanks!
 

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Hunter of many things
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I use one bow for everything. Im not heavily into target or 3d, but If I ever shoot more of either of those, I still want to use my hunting bow just to make me a better hunter.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The same bow can be used for all three types of hunting, usually a 35-37" ATA bow would fit the bill nicely. I would personally use a Prime Centergy Hybrid LD (35" ATA 7" brace height) or a PSE Evolve 35 but I have a 31" draw length and prefer accuracy over speed (I get a lot of speed thru my longer draw), If I had a small draw length I would probably go for something faster for 3D and hunting. My wife uses a Xpedition 6" brace SD cam for hunting and 3d (little hump in the draw and stiff to draw), but she has an old Hoyt target bow with cam and a half cams that she loves for known 3D and target that is smooth as silk, it's 37" ATA.
A shorter brace height will give you 10 feet per second faster because the power stroke is an inch longer. A longer brace height is usually a little more forgiving but slower. Same can be said for ATA length. Short is faster and a little less forgiving.
Some people like to have a bling bow with bright colors for 3D and target, and a camo bow for hunting!
Your draw length has a lot to do with how the ATA length of a bow feels mostly due to string angle at full draw. I like to have my string just barely tickle the front of my nose at full draw, I can't do that with most bows under 34", but everybody is different. If I shot a 28" ATA bow my peep would be way far away, I would have to use a very large peep, and my string would not touch my nose, but I would be plenty accurate out of a tree stand for deer. Hope this helps you!
So much information! Thanks for your response!
 

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edthearcher
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you can use your hunting bow for leagues many do. also many have seperate bows for 3D, dont break your bank only you can make the decission
 

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For the reasons beyond just having more bows, a lot of times it comes down to individual setups for each. For hunting for example, you may have smaller diameter shafts that are heavier, a certain type of rest, different stabilizer setups, and a different draw weight and let off. For 3D, you may want to maximize speed, especially if you are shooting unknown, so lighter arrows and a different diameter. Perhaps the organization rules dictate a max speed you need to be under. For target, again different arrow diameters, plus speed isn't a factor but being able to shoot 45-60 arrows in a shorter amount of time is, so generally a lighter draw and perhaps a lower letoff percentage, plus different stab set up. Then between the three different sights, bow specs which may favor a steadier hold versus being able to haul it around in the brush or manage it in a stand.

As to the question, yes you can do it all with one bow, but some shooters like to maximize their chances and for many that involves fine tuning a setup for the situation.
 

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Socket Man
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Well, just like a lot of things in life until you try out things you simply don't know what they might offer.

I shoot a fully decked out target bow thousands of times per year and compete with it and just enjoy shooting it. I shoot my hunting bow just enough to make sure it is sighted in and other than I stick a deer with it at 20 or so yards and that is it.

Why? Because I love the feel and overall accuracy of a target bow. Target bows offer a lot more when it comes to sights and 4x lens and stabilization and overall fit to the shooter.
 

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you can absolutely use the same bow for all disciplines. thats how i started. and i suspect a lot of other people did.

but as i got more proficient in shooting, i wanted to shoot a more target oriented rig for 3D and the occasional spot game. long stabs, magnification, clarifier, lights, etc... things i wouldnt want on my bow in the woods. but man, do i love how my victory 37 shoots. so now i own 2... one specifically set up for target shooting and one specifically setup for hunting. i even shoot the same arrows for both bows. i like it this way because i primarily hunt but when i make the swap from target to hunting in september, the feel doesnt change much. its just a matter of weight and sight picture.
 

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Different bows have different capabilities. It could be argued that the average hunting bow is engineered towards speed and performance. Target bows are engineered for accuracy and performance. Along with this, hunting bows tend to have a small brace height(distance from grip to string). The smaller the brace height, the faster the bow is(usually), but it is also less forgiving. For this reason target bows usually have a 7 inch or more brace height while there are hunting bows with 5 inch brace height. There is also ATA, or axle to axle. This is the distance from the top axle to the bottom axle. A longer ATA allows for more stability. As a result, target bows are on average have a larger ATA like 37 or 40 while hunting bows are anywhere from 28-34. Besides the bow there is the attachments. Target bows have long stabilizes, for you guessed it.....stabilization. As well as long sights for better accuracy. Hunting bows have shorter sights and shorter stabilizers. Do not forget the cool factor. A fully customized target looks awesome, in my opinion. Kinda like decking out your truck and showing it off to your buddies. All in all, guys use different bows because there is advantages to different kinds of bows.
 

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For the reasons beyond just having more bows, a lot of times it comes down to individual setups for each. For hunting for example, you may have smaller diameter shafts that are heavier, a certain type of rest, different stabilizer setups, and a different draw weight and let off. For 3D, you may want to maximize speed, especially if you are shooting unknown, so lighter arrows and a different diameter. Perhaps the organization rules dictate a max speed you need to be under. For target, again different arrow diameters, plus speed isn't a factor but being able to shoot 45-60 arrows in a shorter amount of time is, so generally a lighter draw and perhaps a lower letoff percentage, plus different stab set up. Then between the three different sights, bow specs which may favor a steadier hold versus being able to haul it around in the brush or manage it in a stand.

As to the question, yes you can do it all with one bow, but some shooters like to maximize their chances and for many that involves fine tuning a setup for the situation.
This is great information! I was looking for the same answer and this helped out a lot. Thankyou
 

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Coram Deo
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1) There's 3D shooting in preparation for hunting and then there's the 3D Archery Game. In the former, I _would_ use my hunting setup. But I'd also use a rangefinder and my EZV sight, both of which are illegal in all the 3D shoots I know of here in NM. I would pass on some shots. And I'd score inner ring = 10, kill = 8, wound = -10. In the 3D Archery Game, if you wanna win, you use a light arrow, an umbrella, big long stabilizers, etc., none of which I actually hunt with.

2) My actual HUNTING bow shoots nothing but broadheads. I have a stack of practice broadheads and I shoot those thru that bow. I practice out to 80 yards with it and at that distance, field tips will fly different just due to the increased drag of the BH. When it comes time to HUNT, I know that bow setup inside out. And I obviously can't shoot it on a 3D range (except mine.....) and definitely not indoors.

3) For NFAA Field rounds, I'm not in any kind of hunting simulation whatsoever. I'm shooting 112 arrows/day in a Grand Field and I can't pull hunting weight that much. So, lighter poundage. Yardages are marked so I don't really need speed except to resist wind (more time in the air, the more it gets blown around). There's gonna be a lot of arrows in the target, so I don't want big stiff broadhead fletchs. I'm not climbing over rocks and trees like I am when hunting, so I want a longer ATA. For indoor spots, I might even switch to fat arrow which will require some bow re-tuning. For me, that bow is my Vector Turbo and I used to have a Hoyt Contender that I used exclusively for indoor spots.

So... multiple bows.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Different bows have different capabilities. It could be argued that the average hunting bow is engineered towards speed and performance. Target bows are engineered for accuracy and performance. Along with this, hunting bows tend to have a small brace height(distance from grip to string). The smaller the brace height, the faster the bow is(usually), but it is also less forgiving. For this reason target bows usually have a 7 inch or more brace height while there are hunting bows with 5 inch brace height. There is also ATA, or axle to axle. This is the distance from the top axle to the bottom axle. A longer ATA allows for more stability. As a result, target bows are on average have a larger ATA like 37 or 40 while hunting bows are anywhere from 28-34. Besides the bow there is the attachments. Target bows have long stabilizes, for you guessed it.....stabilization. As well as long sights for better accuracy. Hunting bows have shorter sights and shorter stabilizers. Do not forget the cool factor. A fully customized target looks awesome, in my opinion. Kinda like decking out your truck and showing it off to your buddies. All in all, guys use different bows because there is advantages to different kinds of bows.
This answered many more questions that I had, thank you for your response!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I just want to thank everyone so far for their responses. I have learned something from each post. :)

NM_Highplains - What's an umbrella for a bow?
 

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I just want to thank everyone so far for their responses. I have learned something from each post. :)

NM_Highplains - What's an umbrella for a bow?


I'm assuming the umbrella isn't for the bow, it's for the shooter's comfort on sunny/rainy days.
 
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