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I recently acquired a second hand Martin Scepter 4 compound bow. Draw weight is 55-70#. I usually shoot more trad and my primary bow is a 50# Bear Montana long bow which I love. I got the Martin and I dialed back the limbs to 55# based on the Martin recommendations that one bolt revolution would reduce the draw weight by 3 lbs, so I unscrewed 5 turns. I figured I can pull 50# no problem, but I find with this new 55# compound I'm struggling. I can pull it back, hold it, and fire it with accuracy. I can shoot 24-30 arrows, but I'm tired by the end and I feel like I am exerting way too much energy with the pull. I figured I would be fine with 55# since I regularly pull the 50#, but this feels way heavier to pull it to the let off. I guess with the long bow, the max weight is 50# at 28# and with the compound the initial weight is 55# until it lets off, but I really feel like I'm struggling significantly more than I should be on the start of the pull and I'm getting fatigued. I'm surprised this 5 extra pounds makes that much difference. What's happening here? Can anyone explain? Thanks in advance for your expertise.
 

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Put it on a scale and verify your pull weight--sometimes the "rule of thumb" is off a bit, and if so, you might be pulling 60 instead of the 55 you expect. And, if this is your first compound and you've not been shooting long, it may take a while to get comfortable. Obviously, the draw cycles of the two bows are very different and you hit max weight in a compound way before you hit it with your longbow. Muscles need time to adapt.
 

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I would say the fact that you can shoot 30 arrows with it means that it is within your draw weight range, but the compound is going to have you pulling that weight immediately as opposed to the progressive nature of a recurve. How does the bow feel after let off? It should have about an 80% let off. Can you tell if you're only holding back about 10 lbs?
 

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Like was said above, there's a huge difference between drawing back and getting to 50#, then maybe even snap shooting and pulling 55# at the point where you're only at a fraction of the compounds poundage! You're not used to pulling 55# at the beginning of the draw cycle.

This is exactly why compounds are so much faster, they store so much more energy! And that energy HAS to come from somewhere...YOU! Bows at just energy storage devices and you're used to mentoring a LOT less than you are now.
And again...if you're getting 30 shots off, you'll get used to it before you know it and be shooting it all day.
 

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You have plenty of time to get stronger and used to the pull.
 

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Yea just keep shooting and don't get all excited and keep launching them down range slow it down I always do 2 arrows and go get it also look at each shot with the binoculars just to slow it down...but 20-30 arrows will go to 40-50 and so on
 

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Some good advice above about the difference between traditional and compound. However, nobody mentioned anything about the bow's draw length. Perhaps it's too long and by the time you start rolling over the cams (Furious?) your body is running out of oomph. Something else you can do temporarily, especially with Martins, is take a couple more turns off the limbs and drop the weight to about 50#. Pay attention to the limb bolts as viewed from the side of the barrel nuts in the riser.

If you are shooting a release it's quite common to have to shorten the drawlength about an inch as compared to shooting fingers. If you added a D-Loop you get stretched out farther yet and I'd advise shortening up about another half inch.

I know some guys are going to say a loop does not change the draw length. Well, it does not change the BOW's draw length, bit it does help determine how much you are stretched out at full draw. That's why, when I set a bow's draw length using a draw board I include the length of the loop.
 

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Shooter of flesh
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Some good advice above about the difference between traditional and compound. However, nobody mentioned anything about the bow's draw length. Perhaps it's too long and by the time you start rolling over the cams (Furious?) your body is running out of oomph. Something else you can do temporarily, especially with Martins, is take a couple more turns off the limbs and drop the weight to about 50#. Pay attention to the limb bolts as viewed from the side of the barrel nuts in the riser.

If you are shooting a release it's quite common to have to shorten the drawlength about an inch as compared to shooting fingers. If you added a D-Loop you get stretched out farther yet and I'd advise shortening up about another half inch.

I know some guys are going to say a loop does not change the draw length. Well, it does not change the BOW's draw length, bit it does help determine how much you are stretched out at full draw. That's why, when I set a bow's draw length using a draw board I include the length of the loop.
Wow...what if you have a 2 inch D loop...does that make a 28" DL a 30" DL? That last sentence of yours just ruined everything else you had to say.

So, someone comes into your shop and asks you to check the DL of their bow, you actually include the D loop??? By including the D loop in the measurement, you are completely out of sync with the rest of the archery world.
 

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Wow...what if you have a 2 inch D loop...does that make a 28" DL a 30" DL? That last sentence of yours just ruined everything else you had to say.

So, someone comes into your shop and asks you to check the DL of their bow, you actually include the D loop??? By including the D loop in the measurement, you are completely out of sync with the rest of the archery world.
Item #1. I do not have a shop. Item #2. I use the bow's draw length + the D-loop to check how close a bow is set to the shooter's measurement for draw length. The whole reason for measuring a person is not to determine their draw length. They don't have a draw length. They can be measured to see about what draw length bow will fit them. By fit I mean what length will lead to good shooting form with the skeletal bones in the back, shoulder and arms in close alignment with what I'll call "normal anchor" for lack of a better phrase.

I can argue it this way. When using a draw board to measure a bow's draw length how do you measure it? Proper way is from deepest part of the grip to the apex of the string at full draw +1.75". Well, just what is the apex of the string? It's the point where the release (hook) attaches If a D-loop is used then the release attaches to it, so why wouldn't the loop be considered to determine the overall draw length? Afterall, the whole point of all this measuring and adjusting is to get the proper fit to align the shoulders and arms with the drawing arm as perfectly aligned with the arrow at full draw.

I might not be out of sync with the rest of the archery world, though. I believe Alan Lui (Nuts&Bolts) explains this in his Nuts&Bolts of Archery. He's just more articulate at it. He calls it total stretch or something like that.
 
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