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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After going through 3 different sight lights I finally got sick of them and decided to try and make my own. It turned out pretty good so I thought I would share along with some step-by-step instructions so anybody else can do the same thing.

I bought everything at the local Radio Shack for about $20. I had a soldering iron and 9V battery at home.

This was my wiring plan:
diagram.jpg

Here is a picture of the box without and with the battery
box1.jpg
box2.jpg
boxwithbattery.jpg


Finished light with the components needed
components.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Components and part numbers

3x2x1 Project Box 270-1801
9V snap connectors 270-324
SPST Micro-mini toggle 275-624
5mm High Brightness white LED 276-017
330 Ohm resisters 271-1315

Also needed
Wire - I used 18 gauge hookup wire (about 4-5' total should be plenty)
Soldering Iron and solder
Phillips screwdriver
Electrical Tape
Zip ties

Optional:
Hot glue gun
LED holder 276-080


Step 1:
Start with the black wire from the 9V snap connector and solder to the 330 Ohm resistor. Solder about halfway up the wire on the resistor and cut the "tag end" off. This way it will fit into the side of the project box easier.

Step 2:
Cut another piece of black wire approximately 1-1.5" long and solder it to the other side of the resistor. Use electrical tape to cover bare wires.

Step 3:
Determine where you want the toggle switch on the side of the project box and drill a hole to install the switch on the box. Insert the switch but do not use the nut to hold it in just yet.

Step 4:
With the resistor fitted into the long side of the box, eyeball the approximate length of wire needed from the resistor to reach one of the tabs on the toggle switch. Mark the wire as needed and then remove everything and proceed to solder it to the toggle switch. It works best if soldered close to a 90 degree angle.

Step 5:
Take a long section (1.5-2') of black wire and solder it to the other tab of the toggle switch. Again, try to solder it at a 90 degree angle to the tab so it travels away from the switch opposite from the wire in step 3. Be very careful here, the tabs are close together and you do not want the wires to touch.

Step 6:
Take another long section of red wire(1.5-2') and solder it to the other half of the 9V snap connector. Again, electrical tape to cover bare wires.

Step 7:
Drill a second hole on the opposite side of the switch from the toggle. It needs to be large enough to get two wires through it.

Step 8:
Start fitting everything into the box. Start with the toggle switch and then bend the wire carefully to fit the resister along the bottom of the long end of the box like in step 4. Take the long red wire and long black wire and feed them through the hole made in step 7.

Step 9:
If you are using a LED holder, Take your LED and feed the "legs" through rubber insulator piece. It's not really needed, but it makes it a little easier to work with. You are ready to solder your red and black wires to the LED. Trim the black and red wires so they are about 12-14" long outside of the box. (Mine are way too long in the picture)

Red wire gets soldered to the LONG leg.
Black wire soldered to the SHORT leg.

Try to solder as high up the "legs" as possible, and then you can trim them afterwards. Use some electrical tape to cover the bare wires.

Step 10:
Attach your battery and test everything. If good, go ahead and use hot melt to hold everything in place in the project box. Attach the Lid using the screws that came with it and you're done! Zip tie to the riser and run the wires along your sight to place LED to wherever you need it.



Some hints and afterthoughts:
  • My wires to the LED are WAY longer than needed. I really only need about a foot outside of the box. I'll make it work for now, but I plan to shorten them up later.
  • There really isn't a good way to attach the project box without zip-ties, and when the battery goes bad I will have to cut the zip ties and use a screwdriver to take the top off of the project box.
  • I took my unworking spot hogg light and adapted it to hold my LED. It works pretty good for now, but I'm sure there is a better way.

Thoughts or comments?
 

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I did basically the same thing but used a basic indication LED and powered it with 2 AA batteries. I got the battery holder from radio shack. I then enclosed the end of my top pin fiber with the led so I (nor the critters) wouldn't see any of the light. The amount of light that travels down the fiber is the perfect amount for those low light shots. I think I may have had $15 at most in this and has already lasted way longer than the little watch batteries that are about $20 for the three needed to power the factory light.
 

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Hey just for reference digikey.com sells those silly batteries at .25 each for those that have good lights the want to keep using
 

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1k pot?
 

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As a suggestion you should use the UV LED it makes the fibers glow.
Great post, almost Identical to the light I made. you can see mine here:
http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showth...post1060430861

The LED I used was a 4v so it for longevity it required a 330 resistor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I actually looked for the UV LED but couldn't find any. That thread was actually what gave me the inspiration to build my own. I really like the way you have the battery easy to access. How did you do your enclosure?

The nice thing about everything I bought is that all I need to make another one is another switch and enclosure. Everything else came with multiple parts in a pack.
 

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I know it's fun building stuff like this but other than that, why? For under $20 you can buy a tiny/light-weight unit with an electronically variable intensity that can be purchased in many colors, including IR and UV. The only DIY challenge is in figuring on how to mount it. Currently, I am using these on Shibuya, Sure-Loc, and four HHA's sights.

If you elect to go this route and need some mounting assistance, feel free to pm.

(need to use black body/covert model)

http://www.photonlight.com/led-flashlights/photon-freedom-micro-led-keychain-flashlight/
 

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I know it's fun building stuff like this but other than that, why? For under $20 you can buy a tiny/light-weight unit with an electronically variable intensity that can be purchased in many colors, including IR and UV. The only DIY challenge is in figuring on how to mount it. Currently, I am using these on Shibuya, Sure-Loc, and four HHA's sights.
http://www.photonlight.com/led-flashlights/photon-freedom-micro-led-keychain-flashlight/
I can answer this. Assurance that the light is going to be working when you need it. I'm notorious for forgetting and leaving my light on. A couple of years ago I was in Vegas and left one of the smaller lights with the small batteries on in my room for about 4 hours. It was noticeably dimmer and the lighting on the line sucked so I struggled. I went to 3 or 4 different stores that evening trying to find the right battery for it and I ended up having to shoot without a light the last day. I spent probably $1200.00 total on the trip and to be frustrated by a dead $2.00 battery well it just plain sucked! Soo... if you shoot a light that uses a 9 volt battery you can find one of those just about anywhere and they can stay lit for 3 days straight. I doubt I spent more than $30.00 on the whole thing so the peace of mind was certainly worth it.

I actually looked for the UV LED but couldn't find any. That thread was actually what gave me the inspiration to build my own. I really like the way you have the battery easy to access. How did you do your enclosure?
I bent my enclosure out of aluminum sign blank. You can get it at Lowes I think, but for sure any sign shop.
 

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I can answer this. Assurance that the light is going to be working when you need it. I'm notorious for forgetting and leaving my light on.........
Gotta admit that I have forgotten to turn them off a couple of times and that the dual 2016's don't have the staying power of a 9 volt.

Since then I have learned to carry extra batteries and, for an emergency, a spare light. The light can easily be changed out in under 5 seconds if your not using the optional screw but, if you are, the time then goes to 15/20 seconds.

Not trying to tell "anyone" what to do.....just offering an idea to those who might be looking for another option.
 

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If I wanted to add a rheostat to mine where would I get one and how would I wire it. Would I still need the 330ohm resister
 

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If I were to attemp to add a time out feature, I would program a picaxe chip to handle this. Would be a simple program to do.
Yes, if you used the small 8 pin PicAxe or Atmel Tiny85 you would have a nice little setup in a very small package.
Once you add a microcontroller you really open the door to a lot of possibilities. Like dimming, timer, on/off switch, switching to different colored LED's etc.
 

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Yes, if you used the small 8 pin PicAxe or Atmel Tiny85 you would have a nice little setup in a very small package.
Once you add a microcontroller you really open the door to a lot of possibilities. Like dimming, timer, on/off switch, switching to different colored LED's etc.
I have all this stuff sitting around not doing anything. I think I'll try and build one up with an 08m picaxe to have the auto off timer in there. How long do you guys think the time out should be? I'll post up when I get it done. Now I'm thinking what else I can add to it.... :)
 
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