Archery Talk Forum banner
21 - 40 of 70 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,486 Posts
Sorry about your eye, thanks for the heads up. Couldn't help seeing they are "Made in China".....
Just shoot a heavy arrow for hunting, that will solve a lot of problems (noise, easier to tune, more penetration) but you won't be able to brag you are shooting 320 fps anymore.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dnv23

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,174 Posts
I have seen bows with string leeches on them that were probably 20 years old. But you do have to press the bow.

Cat Whiskers work good. Trick is learning how to tie them on. Go on You tube and watch a few guys tie them on and how to trim them.

Also...try setting your string stop to just touch your string, sometimes the noise from just buzzing against the string stop until it stops is part of it.

I have for the most quit using them. But they do make some difference. And the last bows I have bought where quieter without them then some old bows where with them. But nothing wrong with having something if you want it.

The Sims leeches will probably cost you a little more speed than the whiskers, but dang do they last, or they use to anyway if the formula is the same.
 

·
The Impartial Archer
Joined
·
19,927 Posts
Years back someone posted of having a eye injury from a brass nock coming off and factory strings. His story sucked. Factory strings have shrink tubing covering the nocks. Shrink wrap is dang tough.
Well, the next came string makers not installing brass nocks. And then stupid heavy rubber thingies came into being. I ain't seen one yet that hasn't slipped.

Got a set of strings without speed buttons. No problem. Measured my old strings for the brass nocks. Installed the nocks and used the same rubber tubing used for aligning peeps. Yep, slipped it on so to cover the brass nocks....No heat needed like shrink wrap...........
Again I'm not saying it can't happen but I personally have never heard of it in the archery circles I have been in over the last 40+ years. I'd still not lose sleep over it personally.

If you look at the number of people that used them, the fact many were put on by average folks and then take the one guy off the net that it happened to then it's still like getting struck by lightening.........

Are you folks saying not to use brass nocks anymore?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Pyme

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Another that hasn't been around all that much.....

Take a look. This bow was shot this way starting day one. It's been retired 3 times. Still like it is in the picture...Brass nock and cushion button.

View attachment 7466688
So you’ve been around forever, and it’s never happened to you so it’s nothing for the rest of us to worry about? Thanks I feel much better now with your logic. Post count does not equal wisdom on Archerytalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,440 Posts
Are you seeing okay out of the eye? I wear eyeglasses and 2 years ago had a stick go behind them and poke me really good. I went to urgent care, they put UV reactant drops in the eye and inspected with a black light, they then gave me healing drops to help out. I was seeing halos around things though. They said it would go away in 1 week and it did. Cost me 20 bucks out of pocket. Go if there are any questions.
 

·
Back Yard Champion
Joined
·
31,281 Posts
So you’ve been around forever, and it’s never happened to you so it’s nothing for the rest of us to worry about? Thanks I feel much better now with your logic. Post count does not equal wisdom on Archerytalk
The logic is; If a brass nock comes off the string it wasn't installed properly.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cnc Jay

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Point taken. But no one ever installs stuff on a bow the wrong way…right? Won’t be as bad with a tied on nock point would it? Your argument is void.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Thanks for the heads up and hope you get better soon. I honestly hate anything to do with eyes and it's also why I hate umbrellas and needles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Oddly perhaps my eyesight has greatly improved in recent years. From early childhood till my late 50's I was near sighted to the point that I had to wear glasses to see anything clearly more than a foot from my face.
Now days, other than sun glasses on a bright day, I don't have to wear glasses at all.
Apparently the same aging mechanism that causes those with excellent vision when young to become far sighted when older worked to reduce my near sightedness.
This thread reminded me of several instances when wearing my regular glasses has prevented eye injuries at work or in the field, but I never gave it any thought at the time.

I use only traditional recurve bows of fairly light pull and don't use any addons that might fail, but still the possibility of limb failure, arrow shattering or a broken string is something I had not given any serious thought to.
Perhaps I'll pick up a pair of anti glare glasses just to be on the safe side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Wow Gimli's ghost that's actually really amazing to hear for me at least. I just started wearing glasses around day to day so this is great news for me. I will have to leave them off when I'm off work away from the computers and phones. I'll have to go back to no glasses while shooting which I much prefer since the frames dont block my site. For protection I used to have a pair of wrap around shades that had a clear swappable lens from Oakley. I used it when I would bike to keep the bugs and dirt out maybe that could help? But might be worse with something breakable around your eyes with things moving at the speed and power they do. Worth a discussion.

Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
But might be worse with something breakable around your eyes with things moving at the speed and power they do. Worth a discussion.
I always bought only glasses with lenses that were projectile resistant. Any OSHA approved prescription safety glasses should be protection enough.
The first pair I bought for myself were an aviator style made with polarized armor glass lenses guaranteed to stop anything moving no more than 400 FPS. They product tested these with an steel air rifle pellet shot directly into the lens.
More modern polycarbonate lenses are even stronger and are commonplace and inexpensive.
Due to the strength needed these were a bit heavy, but worth it. Since they transitioned from transparent to shaded according to ambient light I didn't need to buy sunglasses or clip-ons.
BTW
These type of polarized lenses are not suitable for airline pilots because modern airliner windscreens are also polarized and the combined effect makes it difficult to see outside in strong daylight.

For those who must wear thick lenses I suggest they look into the highly refractive plastics. The plastic itself is heavy for its volume but the lenses can be made so much thinner that the end result is greatly reduced weight.

Anyone who spends a lot of time outdoors should wear some sort of UV resistant lens. Most of my family have developed cataracts as they grew older but my sister and I have not, because we both always wore glasses outdoors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
815 Posts
I don’t see many other guys doing this but I always shoot with sunglasses on, and if it’s dark, glasses. There are enough bad things that can happen that some level of eye protection is a good idea
 
  • Like
Reactions: Limb_bow

·
Back Yard Champion
Joined
·
31,281 Posts
Point taken. But no one ever installs stuff on a bow the wrong way…right? Won’t be as bad with a tied on nock point would it? Your argument is void.
Believe it or not some people still use brass nocks and a cushion button.

Another 2000 Hoyt, a MagnaTec. Set 67 pounds with 29" draw. Retired it after 15 years of (to start) 3D and then all hunting. Just like you see it. Ready to go if I need it.

Wood Tool Garden tool Grass Line
 
  • Like
Reactions: Limb_bow

·
Back Yard Champion
Joined
·
31,281 Posts
I don’t see many other guys doing this but I always shoot with sunglasses on, and if it’s dark, glasses. There are enough bad things that can happen that some level of eye protection is a good idea
Bet you use those Kevlar shooting gloves in case you bust a arrow at the shot....

Every picture posted on AT that shows arrows through hands was caused by stupidity, not done with a good arrow.
We've shot .500" spine arrows with 70 pounds and never had one break with the shot.

Two fresh in my mind; Man broke a arrow, stuck in the 3rd tube of his quiver, mistakenly nocks it. Yep, splinters right the end of his fingers. Another, man draws back with a arrow too short. Got nervous, pulled the arrow. Yep, through the meat of the back of his thumb and right on out....

Living in fear is kind of stupid........
 
  • Like
Reactions: Limb_bow

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,475 Posts
I'm not going to quite multiple replies, but I'm with Sonny regarding brass nocking points.

I've shots tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of shots using them. For many decades, it was all that was used by everybody, on every single bow being shot.

The design is so simple and so basic as to be basically foolproof. Sure, anything can fail, but I'll take my chances on a small piece of metal with no moving parts crimped tightly around the string, gripping a nylon layer to give it even better holding power, over something else that is flailing around and whiplashing pieces back and forth every time the string is released.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Limb_bow

·
Back Yard Champion
Joined
·
31,281 Posts
Denigrating someone's choice to use the simplest of safety measures is not all that brilliant.
Go back and read post #14. The Poster noted Traditional bows. Brass nocks have been used on traditional (stick/recurve) bows since brass nocks were invented.
What's his name then gave of glasses for eye protection. I came back with the Kevlar glove.
What it amounts to and common on AT is pumping up a mole hill into a mountain....

Noted somewhere above one gave of these incidents far less to happen than getting struck by lightening...

Nope, I'm not going to live in fear.......
 
21 - 40 of 70 Posts
Top