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I would like to train one of my three dogs for tracking a wounded deer. Has anyone had good success tracking with dogs? I have a beagle, Lab, and a Lab/teerier mix. Which one would be best?Any advice on training?
 

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my beagle is awsome keep him on a leash and only use blood to train if you use hides legs or other stuff the will follow the animal that has the most smell not the one thats bleeding have fun this is verry rewarding and fun.
 

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I read an article on this a couple months ago and they said just about any dog can be trained to track a wounded deer in 2 weeks (or in some cases less) with daily work. They suggested to start out with a 10-20 yard blood trail you make yourself that is pretty large...reward the dog for tracking. Continue to decrease the amount of blood while increasing the trail size....reward the dog and keep him focused on the "task". I'll see if I can dig up the article, but these are some of the points I remembered from it. The thing I found the most striking was the short amount of time a dog could be trained to do this.
 

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there is nothing more ethical than training a dog to track wounded animals.

sometimes there are, unfortunately, legal issues with doing so. I'm pretty sure if you use a leash, those worries are unfounded.

I would think a beagle trained to follow a bleeding deer would be absolutely the best thing ever. there are organizations and even businesses formed around finding wounded animals. I think that is awesome and I fully support it. I wish I knew of persons or services locally that could provide this kind of help.

It might be a challenge training a dog to go after wounded deer and ignore all the healthy ones, but gheez, if you mastered it with your dog you would be a god.
 

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I have a beagle and figured she should be great for that. Anyone know the first steps you would take.
 

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I think that using blood trailing dogs to recover deer is a great idea. I have read articles about it and it is legal in only something like 4 states. The article mentioned 2 organizations that are trying to sway other states to reconsider the use of these trained dogs. They operate under very strict guidelines.
 

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Let the dogs tell you which one to use.

I have a Chocolate Lab that I am training to blood track. The way I selected him from the litter was, to fill an eye dropper with blood and spray it into the air. He was the only one that showed interest and would follow the dropper around the room.

I bought a book called Tracking Dogs for Finding Wounded deer by John Jeanneny. It has allot of good info on training methods to get dogs motivated and more importantly what kind of conditions are tracking friendly.

If you want to know what dog will track, buy 1lb of fresh beef liver from the refrigerator of the supermarket. Take a small piece of the liver and blend it up with the blood in the container.

Get all the blood out of the liver. It helps to use a strainer and gently wring out every drop of the blood. Now using a stick with a piece of sponge on the end, blot out a blood trail. One blot every 3 feet.

Make sure the trail is layed early enough or late enough that the blood stays wet after 4-5 hrs. If there is dew on the ground the blood will stay wet.

5 hrs will give your scent time to dissipate. Keep the trail shorter than 200 yrds and leave the remaining liver at the end of the trail.

There is no scent on earth more attractive to a dog then liver. Let them go by themselves. If they show no interest then they never will be blood trackers.
 

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It is perfectly legal to use leashed tracking dogs to recover wounded game in Michigan.
 

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Everyone needs to check their state's regulations for using dogs to track wounded game. :nod:

Using a leashed dog to find wounded game should be legal in all states. :thumb:
Ohio does allow using a leashed dog to recover wounded deer.

Good hunting, Bowhunter57
 

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I forgot to mention that you MUST run the trail downwind. Otherwise the dog will air scent all the way to the reward.
 

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a buddy of mine has a redbone coonhound that he trained to track wounded deer. it stil amazes me what these dogs can do even on nominal hits. we however didnt keep it on a leash and it got a little hairy a couple times when it would bay a pissed off wounded buck in the middle of the night. ever seen 2 grown men wrestle a 140 in. buck and finish it with pocketknives... i have twice.unfotunatly this dog got a reputation and he was constantly getting phone calls to come and help guys track wounded deer.this dog recently died at the age of 17 years it was buried with a marlin model 60 22. rifle its only other companion in the coonhuntin woods of central missouri.
 

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mofarmboy, I live in the southeast part of the state, and a conservation agent told me that the use of a dog is illegal. I had a discussion with him about the ethical issues of using a dog, and he said that he agreed with me, but the state of Missouri didn't. You might have your friend check the game laws about using his dog to track. I myself think it should be legal anywhere in the U.S. I would hate to see your friend get in trouble, while trying to to the ethical thing. Tony
 

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we are well aware of the game laws but when it comes down to recovering the deer or letting the coyotes get it the decision is a simple one. i have personally never had to use the dog but i have been along on some tracking expeditions.this dog has found at leats a half dozen deer that would would have been otherwise lost. we're talking no bloodtrail strictly scent. this was truely an exceptional dog and as i said he died this past summer and there are no plans to train another.
good luck this season!
 

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I know a guy that trained a beagle to bloodtrail and that little dog was impressive. I asked how he trained it and he told me that he'd take a pack of deer or elk steak and use it to "drip" a bloodtrail. He'd make the trails longer and longer and leave the steak at the end of the trail for the dog. Basically the same as the liver method mentioned above but with steak.
 

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Dogs are great for tracking deer...Their is mutt that runs the farm we hunt and she has led us to wounded deer on more than one occasion...No one has ever trained her, just in her nature I guess...But if the deer isn't dead then we have a fight on our hands...That can be a hairy situation after dark...!
 

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mofarmboy said:
we are well aware of the game laws but when it comes down to recovering the deer or letting the coyotes get it the decision is a simple one. i have personally never had to use the dog but i have been along on some tracking expeditions.this dog has found at leats a half dozen deer that would would have been otherwise lost. we're talking no bloodtrail strictly scent. this was truely an exceptional dog and as i said he died this past summer and there are no plans to train another.
good luck this season!
I agree with you 100%. I am just saying that the state may not see it the same way we do. I honestly don't think that a game warden would fine you for doing it, unless he is a newbie straight out of school. That dog your friend had sounds like one heck of a dog. It is wonderful thing when a man, and an animal can work together in perfect sync. Tony
 

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Beagles are Awesome trackers Here is a picture of "OPPIE" my li'l Buddy with one of his finds
 

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you dont need to learn a Beagle to track dear, that´what they are bred for.
 

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Nito said:
you dont need to learn a Beagle to track dear, that´what they are bred for.
Hmmm.....really. :crazy: I thought they were bred to hunt rabbits....and were often "side tracked" chasing deer, by mistake. :nod:

Good hunting, Bowhunter57
 
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