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Discussion Starter #1
More questions for those that know - first, I shoot most comfortably at about 60# draw weight and most manufacturers sell bows that are 50 to 60 or 60 to 70. Is it better to get a 50 to 60 and bottom out the limbs or to get a 60 to 70 and back the limbs out. Second, the bottom cam on the Browning Mirage is way off center - not canted but not nearly centered on the axle(left to right) - is it supposed to be that way? Sorry if these questions are silly or if they've been answered already elsewhere in the forum.

By the way - my new boss gave me the first week of October off. What a guy!!
 

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So whats going on the first week of October.
 

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I also shoot 60 # and have read that it is better to shoot a 50-60# bow at max then to back a 70#er back to 60, get better performance. Sorry I don't know one thing about that cam, only thing I would now would be a bent axle, sounds like that to me. Whats going on the first week of October??
 

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hi.i see that you only have 5 post,so welcome to AT.
i like to shoot 62 or 63 lbs on my bows. most bows bottom out a little more than what the manufacture says. my 60lb bow maxis out at 62lbs so that is perfict.

i would say go with a 50 to 60 lb, that way you won't have to let much off the limbs. in my experience bows shoot better the closer they are to being maxed out. i hope this help you,and again welcome to AT.
 

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There are two advantages to shooting a 50-60 at or near max. It'll shoot slightly faster than a 70# bow backed off although not a lot. The biggest factor is because the rigging is tighter the bow will normally shoot more quietly.

Now that being said it is not necessary to shoot a bow maxed out. Limb bolts make a bow adjustable and are a very useful tool for tuning. Always cheaper than buying new arrows if you need to change something. And infinitely more precise than changing points, etc.

Second question: I assume you have a singel cm. Yes, the string groove is almost always off center on these and the idler wheel is centered in the top limb. So from bottom to top the string acually angles across the bow.

There are very few bows that have everything down the middle. Only one I can think of right now is the Martin Nitrous cams, a dual cam setup.

I know what comes in October. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, bfisher

Just an update - put a few accessories on the Browning (didn't want to tear down the PSE for parts - it's ready to go) - peep, tru glo pins, Shock Blocker and the old TM Hunter that was on the PSE before the biscuit. Changed the draw length to 28" - measured the tiller, ata and checked the cam holes to the string - all looked good. Drew an arrow and the draw was suprisingly light! I had drawn it at 29" and it seemed pretty stiff. But set at 28" it was so light I eventually bottomed out the limbs and backed them out one quarter turn. bfisher - it's got two cams. A friend watched while I drew slowly a few times and he said the cams looked to be in time - he also checked at full draw and they were in line. I was told that changing the draw length wouldn't alter the draw weight but it surely seems to have done just that. My friend said it might just be that it's getting to the "let off point" sooner. Is that possible? Also - there is an "inside" row of holes to an angle from the holes that are used to change draw length - are these for half inch draw adjustments or for 1 inch adjustments for the 85% let off? Year of manufacture of the Mirage 1.5 is 2004 if that helps. Thanks again in advance for helping a 'newbie' to the latest archery technology.
 

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The shorter draw length will push the peak weight point of the cycle earlier in the draw, so it will feel like is is lighter.

Good luck
 
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