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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings,

I apologize because I'm sure this kind of question is asked and answered ad infinitum.

First, my intended use is simple target practice with my grown son. It'll likely never advance to any more than that.

I'm confused on this one issue.

My estimated draw length is 26.8” The draw length/bow size charts I see appear to recommend a bow size of 66 to 68”. This is tending to make me choose a Samick Polaris of 66”. However when I read the descriptions of various products including the Samick Sage (which is a 62” bow) on Amazon, it says “for up to 29 inch draw”.

I'm confused by the discrepancy there.

Any insight would be appreciated.

I'm leaning towards the Samick brand because it's well known and replacement parts and accessories seem readily available. Any suggestions in that regard are appreciated as well.

Thank you.

Tom
 

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Where I have found a lot of help here on this forum, I would suggest going to local archery shop and they can help you all your archery questions and fit you to a bow at the same time. Not all bows measure the same.

Thx gjmen
 

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Greetings,

I apologize because I'm sure this kind of question is asked and answered ad infinitum.

First, my intended use is simple target practice with my grown son. It'll likely never advance to any more than that.

I'm confused on this one issue.

My estimated draw length is 26.8” The draw length/bow size charts I see appear to recommend a bow size of 66 to 68”. This is tending to make me choose a Samick Polaris of 66”. However when I read the descriptions of various products including the Samick Sage (which is a 62” bow) on Amazon, it says “for up to 29 inch draw”.

I'm confused by the discrepancy there.

Any insight would be appreciated.

I'm leaning towards the Samick brand because it's well known and replacement parts and accessories seem readily available. Any suggestions in that regard are appreciated as well.

Thank you.

Tom
Hello peaceoflight1. The folks here in General Discussion AUTOMATICALLY assume you are asking about a Compound Bow. The Samick Polaris is a wooden, three piece recurve bow. The Samick Sage is also a three piece wooden recurve bow. So, no need to goto a pro shop. Better to find an archery club that gives beginner recurve lessons. ALL recurve bow "measure" the same for draw length. You assume a "proper" stance with your feet and ankles and hips and shoulders. Then, you hook your fingers around the bowstring, three fingers. So, SPLIT finger hold, means you have the index finger above the nock and the middle finger and 4th finger below the nock. I don't recommend this for an absolute recurve beginner. I recommend the THREE FINGERS under hold, for a beginning recurve shooter. Index finger tip, will hit the corner of your mouth, as an anchor reference point. The estimated draw length of 26.8-inches using a formula, is a real GUESS-TI-MATE. Realistically, as a beginner recurve shooter, your draw length will be LESS, much less than what the formula GUESS will be your draw length. With the THREE fingers under hold, all three fingers UNDER the nock, you can shoot ANY size of recurve bow. Impossible to have nock pinch on your fingers, cuz ALL of your fingers are under the nock.

I teach recurve and compound bows.

I have a 30-inch draw length and I am 6'2" tall, and I have ZERO trouble shooting the Samick Polaris, the 62-inch version, as long as I use three fingers UNDER the nock. So, the Samick SAGE is a really really nice bow, super smoooooth. But, you will find that a 66-inch bow is less TOUCHY than a 62-inch recurve bow, cuz of the string angle. What that means for a beginner...the 66-inch bow is more forgiving of small form problems, especially with your string hand release technique (how you loose the string). With time, you will get better at this. EITHER bow is going to do you fine. Just stick to 20 lb limbs, or 25 lb limbs. THE BIGGEST thing, is to get the appropriate arrow stiffness (tube diameter) and the point weight, so the arrows fly where you are looking.

99 times out of 100, for my brand new recurve students, the "pro shop" that specializes in compound hunting bows, 99 times out of 100, always sell arrows that are RIDICULOUS too stiff, so what happens? For a RIGHT handed beginning recurve shooter, arrows that are 1 spine rating or 2 spine ratings or 3 spine ratings TOO STIFF, the arrows will miss LEFT of where you are looking. So, when you decide if you want to purchase the 66-inch Polaris, or the 62-inch Sage...lemme know, and I can run some software, and help you select an appropriate arrow (tube diameter, tube length, point weight) that will fly straight, will fly where you are looking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Many thanks on that info.

I'd already thought the 25 lb. draw was the way to go.

This is about having fun, but I'd still like to start out on the correct foot, so to speak.

I'm also considering the SWA Spyder, which is 62" and appears to be quite similar to the Sage.

Thanks again.

Tom
 
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