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I just purchased a hoyt avenger w/ a draw weight of 60-70#. the bow shop set it up for 58# draw, IS THIS SAFE?? WILL IT DAMAGE THE BOW?? How low can you set a 60-70# bow?? Thanks for the help!!!
 

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I just purchased a hoyt avenger w/ a draw weight of 60-70#. the bow shop set it up for 58# draw, IS THIS SAFE?? WILL IT DAMAGE THE BOW?? How low can you set a 60-70# bow?? Thanks for the help!!!
IMO it is not safe!!If you are not comfortable w/pulling 63#+ you need a bow w/ 60#max.limbs.Your bow will perform better and you can go lower on your poundage if needed.Sounds to like the shop you purchased the bow from is just looking to make $$$.There are alot half arsed shops out there.That just want get your money and send you on your way.;)
 

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Should have ordered a 50-60# bow

Limbs are designed for max effic. at the upper end of the poundage for that set of limbs.Like buying an eight cyl. engine and only useing 6 or 7 cylinders.I would have him get the proper set of limbs for the wieght you want to shoot.
 

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IMHO - this would be the bottom range for the bow. I do not know how far out the limb bolts are turned or how much more of the bolt is remaining, but I would be concerned. I have seen people try to adjust the weight so low that the bolts came out. Yes, the person was a dork...but it did happen.

I am also in agreement with previous posts that indicate the efficiency of the bow at such a low weight is reduced. Bows are designed to be most efficient at their max poundage. If you can purchase a set of limbs for 50-60 lbs and sell the ones you have, you would be better off.
 

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It depends on the bow. I have a Reflex Growler with 60# limbs. Though it was not the best for its performance, we were safely able to turn it down to 45# to start me off.

If you are new and expect to gain strength fairly quickly, its not a bad way to start. If that is the max you will be shooting, then you should probably change out the limbs.
 

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Completely agree with MN Chick. Not positive, but I thought my Hoyts stated something to the effect not to turn the bolts out more than 6 turns. My current indoor set up in fact was about 2# under the 50-60 rating and it shot fine and was within the max recommended number of turns. I wouldn't go too much more below that, unless still within the manufacturer's suggested limit (varies bow to bow I believe). Reason I went the direction I did was because I knew I'd be shooting the bow in the 50-60 range for outdoors, hence needed the room to up the pounds which a 40-50 would not be capable of.

Anyhow, if you feel 58# or thereabouts is the max you'll ever plan on shooting, then definitely probably would be better to get a set of 50-60 limbs for the bow. Otherwise if you're ever planning on moving the poundage up into the 60's later down the road with the same bow, then shouldn't hurt to stick with the current 60-70's you already have.

IMO :)

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