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I Know The Result Of A Dry Fire But Why What Causes Such A Force To The Bow To Damage It Does An Arrow Really Absorb All That Energy... Any Explinations
 

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absolutely not TRX. Let me explain a little...physics for ya. :D

When you pull your bow back, an arrow on the string, potential energy is stored in the limbs and in the string. What potential energy is, is stationary object containing the ablility to produce energy. Fuel can also be seen as stationary energy. You see, the thing about energy, is that it cannot be destroyed. It can only change form. Example...When you burn fuel for a car, it goes from potential(sitting in the tank) to being burned off into heat energy. All used energy eventually ends up as heat energy. That is also one theory of how the world will end. (see, archery is connected to everything) So, when you fire the bow, this potential energy in the limbs and string is turned into kinetic energy (energy of motion). The energy is moved into the arrow, and the arrow flies toward your target. Now not all of it goes to the arrow, hence noise, vibration, and hand shock. This is the principle behind the TEC riser of hoyts. They want the left over energy to travel to the bar behind the handle, instead of going into the handle. Now if that arrow isnt there, the energy has to go somewhere. Mainly, into the limbs. The original source of the energy. Not to bash Bowtech, as they are my second favorite bows, but this is a major problem of theirs. They are so fast and powerful, that it is MUCH more dangerous to dry fire a bowtech as opposed to a hoyt, or even a matthews. All of that energy goes strait back into the limbs, causing severe vibration, which can crack and damage the limbs. In some cases making them explode. So just because you do not see an immediate crack, does not mean that nothing is wrong.

Hope this has explained things a little for you, good luck :)
 

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Mbuemi is right about the energy dissipation. That is also where the size & spline of the arrow comes into play. I would take it to a Pro Shop & have it looked at. You could have also warped a cam or axle. Glad your OK!
 

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I didn't dry fire a bow. A buddy of mine, who had never pulled back a bow, let one go about half draw. He is still shooting the bow and everything seemed to be fine. Thanks for the info though.
 

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TRX32 said:
I didn't dry fire a bow. A buddy of mine, who had never pulled back a bow, let one go about half draw. He is still shooting the bow and everything seemed to be fine. Thanks for the info though.
Your buddies that you hang out with are apparently not too bright!!!!!! :D

:rolleyes:
 

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mbuemi said:
absolutely not TRX. Let me explain a little...physics for ya. :D

Not to bash Bowtech, as they are my second favorite bows, but this is a major problem of theirs. They are so fast and powerful, that it is MUCH more dangerous to dry fire a bowtech as opposed to a hoyt, or even a matthews. All of that energy goes strait back into the limbs, causing severe vibration, which can crack and damage the limbs. In some cases making them explode. So just because you do not see an immediate crack, does not mean that nothing is wrong.

While I agree in most part with the explanation of energy transfer, I would disagree with the above about Bowtech’s... somewhat strongly, and I never bash. Not attacking you, but letting all know of what my personal experience tells me.

I have heard of and seen dry fires from Bowtechs.. One when shooting on a Saturday, indoors, and the bow had no damage.

The most notable, was an OLD Glory in an indoor 3-d event.. Not only did it not do ANY damage... the guy kept shooting in the comp. and did well. I know the person, he is a shop owner where I shoot, and he put another 5,000 to 8,000 arrows through that bow and has never rebuilt anything on it, except changing strings.. He still shot a whole lot of 300, 59 - 60x’s games with it… as well using it as outdoors etc.. I know... I had to shoot against him!

If anything my actual experience says they are possibly more resistant, but that is a sample size of 2.. I am not sure where you are getting your data from.. Please share.
 

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Well it was probably wrong of me to say that, Metal. What i was saying about BT's was really based off of assumptions and stories between friends and accquaintances. I can see what you are saying about how some of them are longer bows, and that WOULD make them more durable. The energy would dissipate over a larger area with less force. As opposed to a short axle to axle like my vtec, or a switchback.
 

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Ya, Short ata, may be less durable for things like a dryfire. Actually: It is a wonder how any of them survive... The stresses that hit those limbs are amazing.
 

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when im older and have the money, im taking the top end hoyt, bowtech, matthews, PSE, and Martin equivelents of each other, and see how many dry fires they will take. Of course they will be be setup exactly as how the average person would order one, bare bow, with only the stock vibration dampeners on them. Need a stand to hold them too...
 

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mbuemi said:
when im older and have the money, im taking the top end hoyt, bowtech, matthews, PSE, and Martin equivelents of each other, and see how many dry fires they will take. Of course they will be be setup exactly as how the average person would order one, bare bow, with only the stock vibration dampeners on them. Need a stand to hold them too...
I'll help you with that, just send me the Mathews or Bowtech and I will be glad to send you the results. Ofcourse I will dispose of the remains of the bow properly:wink:
 

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If your buddy is still shoting the bow with no problems, then it should be fine. A friend of mine had a hoyt absolutely blow up from a dry fire. The limbs shattered the cams were toast and some how still managed to bend the axles. I think it is because of the split limbs. I am not trying to bash Hoyt either.
 

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If you want to feel a dry fire for yourself, throw a baseball as hard as you can. Then forget to put the ball in your hand hand throw it again as hard as you can(by forget i mean nothing in your hand the second time). When you are done with that second throw you should see how it feels. That is how your bow feels with now arrow.
 

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mq32hunter said:
If you want to feel a dry fire for yourself, throw a baseball as hard as you can. Then forget to put the ball in your hand hand throw it again as hard as you can(by forget i mean nothing in your hand the second time). When you are done with that second throw you should see how it feels. That is how your bow feels with now arrow.
As I read this thread, I was all ready to give the same example. This is part of why you need arrows that are heavy enough for your bow's draw weight.
 
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