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Hey everyone!

Just started archery this fall and only have cheap arrows with field points right now that I didn't put much thought into before buying. I'd like to buy a dozen nice arrows soon but I have some questions. Please tell me if the following is realistic or not.. In my mind I feel like it would be nice to buy a dozen arrows, and put field tips on 4, fixed broadheads on 4 (for elk), and mechanicals on 4 (for whitetail)... Also, is it possible to get all 12 the same weight and to fly the same so i can just switch out arrows for each season? being a beginner, I really want to stay away from tinkering with sights/rests and just be able to focus on shooting, but maybe I need to get over that and realize I'm always going to need to tinker? Please help me shed some light on arrows and what is common practice for people and what is most realistic/efficient to do if i plan to whitetail AND elk hunt fairly regularly. TIA !!
 

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My answer is. sure you could do that...but. I have found nothing flies like a field point. I know others will say all their broadheads do. You being a beginner and not wanting to tinker, I'm guessing you setup wont be grouping fixed. Fp, and mechs together. You will need to get over your fear and tinker with your rig. Perfect flight is your goal.

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If you were to bare shaft tune and then broadhead tune the fixed blades you could shoot the same arrows if the heads and tips are all the same weight and you have correctly spined arrows.

Lucky
 

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Look at an arrow spine calculator, if you're on the borderline, for draw weight or length, then bump up to the stiffer spine.

Know what weight BHs you're going to shoot from the start. 100s, 125s, 150s etc. Shoot a BH known for good flight. Slick Trick, Ram Cat, Montecs, etc

You can weigh your arrows and make some self-set tolerance i.e. 430 grain arrows +/- 10 grains. And batch them accordingly.

To aid in getting consistency throughout your arrows, you need to "spine" them. And if you're doing 3 vanes, the common practice is to put the cock vane inline
with the spine.

Number all your arrows 1-12
Group together, adjust, or discard your "flyer" arrows, because they do occur

Fixed blades are going to create the most trouble for you during tuning if your arrow spine is too weak . So you need to have your spine suitable for those.* The field points and mechanicals will do what ever within reasonable adjustment .

You will have to adjust the rest a little and you will have to adjust the sight when first starting. Pretty much inevitable.

Those are some starting points that I used.

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It's absolutely possible to get your field points, fixed heads and mechanical heads to shoot the same within reasonable hunting distance. If you have good consistent form, bareshaft tune the bow and make sure all your broadheads spin true, you will be able to shoot any head you want out to 40 yards and even further as long as it spins true.

You will need to practice a lot and make sure you have a consistent grip and you are shooting the proper DL before you will be able to shoot bareshafts consistently. Don't expect everything to just come right together. I would dial in your grip/form and release execution before you even mess with bareshafts or fixed blade heads.

Anyone that says it's not possible either has inconsistent form, is shooting too weak of a spine or doesn't know how to bareshaft or broadhead tune.
 

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(aka lug nut)
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Hey everyone!

Just started archery this fall and only have cheap arrows with field points right now that I didn't put much thought into before buying. I'd like to buy a dozen nice arrows soon but I have some questions. Please tell me if the following is realistic or not.. In my mind I feel like it would be nice to buy a dozen arrows, and put field tips on 4, fixed broadheads on 4 (for elk), and mechanicals on 4 (for whitetail)... Also, is it possible to get all 12 the same weight and to fly the same so i can just switch out arrows for each season? being a beginner, I really want to stay away from tinkering with sights/rests and just be able to focus on shooting, but maybe I need to get over that and realize I'm always going to need to tinker? Please help me shed some light on arrows and what is common practice for people and what is most realistic/efficient to do if i plan to whitetail AND elk hunt fairly regularly. TIA !!
Buy a dozen of nice arrows, and pay for some compound bow lessons. Here is a photo of the AFTER results, for schuler26.



He didn't pay me, and I didn't charge. That is one fletched field point arrow at 20yards, that is one bareshaft arrow (no vanes), with a field point at 20 yards, and that is one fixed blade broadhead at 20 yards. JUST buying a dozen nice arrows is a start. Then, you have to work on your form, and then, you have to work on the bow tuning to get everything hitting together at 20 yards.
 

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Rather than buying expensive arrows, I suggest you purchase an E Z Green bow press (didn't see that coming did ya?) Why?? Hate to tell you, you not only have to tinker, but you MUST become a bow tuner (your new goal). You also need to find a used Bitz fletching jig, so you can build quality arrows (not buy them) from cheap shafts. What? Watch the Samuel White Youtube video on arrows (might be a couple of them now. Then go to Walmart and get some Mossy Oak arrows (they will be going on sale soon cheap), scrape off the Blazers and then spine align them and fletch them with 3" feathers. Find the rotation of your bare shaft first, then get the right jig for the Bitz and fletch the shafts. Trust me, you will save a bunch of money and shoot better with yout tuned equipment.
 

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To me you can easily overthink arrow setup in a hurry and when you mention putting 4 field points and 4 fixed and 4 mechanical on your dozen you are falling into that trap, I would suggest to you to just get a good dozen gold tip xt hunter arrows and put 12 field points on them and get to shooting. Rotate the nocks as the months go by putting different vanes on top until they are hitting the same. Then when season comes up fill your quiver with the broadheads you intend to use and practice with one of them to see how it hits compared to your field points. At this time your tuning ability will be tested because a poor tune job on the fixed heads will show up in a hurry.

Right now it is all about what your bow draw length is and the poundage of the bow so we can see what gold tip xt shaft to get you into as far as spine and shaft length. Also It would be nice for you to tell me what total weight of a arrow you really want to shoot so that I can see what shaft to set you up in also.

For a normal good arrow choice for general hunting and shooting a gold tip hunter xt 340 is a awesome arrow when you put 100 grain points on it. Now if you are planning on going super heavy or something then a stiffer spine with point weight up front will happen.
 
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