Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I generally use .019 Easton pin nocks but recently have tried using some arrows with .019 Easton G nocks (the ones that insert into the shaft--not pins). I was surprised at the difference in tightness on the string. If my string fits the .019 pin nocks well, the .019 G nocks fall off too easily. If I make the string thicker so that it fits the .019 G nocks well, it seems too tight for the .019 pin knocks. I was wondering if my experience here is unusual, or if it is common. I expect nock size variation between manufacturers, but was surprised to see the difference within the same manufacturer.

(I called Easton, and twice they said they'd get right back to me, which they never did. I called a third time and the person said every bow is different ....)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
Easton doesn't make .019 nocks of any kind. The nock sizes are .098 or .088. Are you talking serving size?
 

·
Lowered expectations
Joined
·
15,910 Posts
Perhaps you have been using .088” throat “small” pin nocks and changed to .098” throat “large” G nocks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
Yes the Easton .098 G pin nock is tighter than the regular .098 g nock. Not by much but a little.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Yes, of course, I was confused when I said the nocks were .019; I meant the large nocks, .098. Although I had some small (.088) nocks long ago, both the G Nocks and Pin Nocks I'm using now are large .098. This is hard for me to describe, but I do notice there is a difference in throat shape between the pin nocks and G nocks. After the round part of the nock that the string sits in, the pin nocks narrow a noticeable amount before the end of the nock; this produces a noticeable snap or click when the arrow is nocked. The G nocks narrow only slightly, which is why they can pop off the string easier. I think the round circular area that the string sits in may be the same size on both pin and G nocks, but the difference seems to be that the pin nocks narrow more, and so they snap or clip onto the string more than the G nocks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
There is a difference between the Easton "Pin Nock", the "G pin nock". I didn't realize it until I ordered some pin nocks (not G pin nocks) by mistake. I ASS-umed they were the same.
The G Pin nock is almost the same as the standard G nock, but I have noticed that the G pin nock is ever so slighter tighter on the string.
Look at the picture to see the difference between a "Pin Nock" (upper) and a "G pin nock" (lower)
7281591
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,318 Posts
PIN nocks were designed for optimal recurve performance, and improved protection for X10 shafts, back in the mid 1990’s.

The G-Pin, which is a much more recent design, was designed as an all-around performer, and works for both fingers and compound, but is better than the PIN for compound generally (though certainly, many compound shooters have successfully used the regular PIN nock).

The design differences of the G-nock allow a more linear release from the string which is desirable for release aid use. But yes, the string fit is different.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top