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I am currently tuning my bow and I wanted to increase my brace height. Does adding twists to a bow string affect the already set nocking point? Would half twists on each end prevent the nocking point from changing?
 

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Increasing brace height will raise your nock point, lowering b/h drops it. Think this is due to the nock point being located above the center of the string length.
 

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Changing brace height does not change nocking point. The nock is still in the same place, only the limb tips are moving forward or back because the string is becoming shorter or longer. Changing tiller changes nock point.

In order for the brace height to change the nock point, you would have to be able to change only one limb. Twisting the string changes both limbs so the movement is cancelled out.


Chris
 

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While in an ideal world Chris is correct, there are a few other things to consider however.

Normally the limbs are balanced such that the lower limb is a little weaker because we pull it just a little bit more and thus work it a little bit more. (one finger over, 2 fingers under) also the reason we set tiller to be a little offset.

If the lower limb is a little weaker, by pulling both limbs with the same amount of energy, one should bend a little bit more than the other and so, the nock point should move up slightly.

Some mgf changes, the advent of limb bolts and adjustable weights have made this information even more confusing.

The order of what we adjust and tune for do make a difference. Brace height is one of the first things we adjust because it does affect a lot of other things.

Does it make enough difference that you need to obsess about it?

Probably not.

So the short answer? It depends!

Both above answers can be correct. How we draw the bow, how we balance the grip of the bow (heel of the grip or press with the web) how we distribute pressureon the drawing fingers can all affect the nock height adjustment and most forgiving brace height.

Keep reminding yourself, "we tune a bow to make it more forgiving to our errors and maybe to be more efficient"

A poorly tuned bow shot exactly the same every time will put the arrows in the same place. (Assuming matching arrows)

Confused yet?
 

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I am currently tuning my bow and I wanted to increase my brace height. Does adding twists to a bow string affect the already set nocking point? Would half twists on each end prevent the nocking point from changing?
It doesn't matter which end you twist from. As soon as you put tension of the string, the twists will be evenly distributed along the string length.
 

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Physics aside for the moment ...

I have had nock points shift enough to require readjustment during significant changes in brace height during tuning.

While I'm using the bow square to check the new brace height, I always check the nock point. Sometimes they are the same ... sometimes they are different. I use masking tape nocks during tuning until settled in, and then tie on a permanent nock when finished.

We now return you to Physics ...
 

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Physics aside for the moment ...

I have had nock points shift enough to require readjustment during significant changes in brace height during tuning.

While I'm using the bow square to check the new brace height, I always check the nock point. Sometimes they are the same ... sometimes they are different. I use masking tape nocks during tuning until settled in, and then tie on a permanent nock when finished.

We now return you to Physics ...
Great observation and again it's practical vs theoretical.

My recommendation for someone just starting down this journey.
Oh yeah, This is for the Obsessive/Compulsive person.
1. Set your brace height (close to where you think it should be)
2. Set your nock location. (everyone has differing ideas with this starting point too)
4. Set your centershot/plunger etc by eye. Not too critical yet. Again a starting position for good clearance is all I am trying to achieve at this point.
5. Shoot several arrows checking for clearance. (make sure no riser/fletch impacts)
6. Now set your brace height over several ends of arrows adjusting up or down for minimum noise. (quieter string release to find optimum arrow/string separation).
7. Reset your nock locator (again depending on your preference)
8. Recheck for clearance
9. Now start tuning for proper tiller and nock location using whatever process you find works for you (moving your nock point just 1/32" can make a difference) Make small changes..
10. Once you have found what works for you in these areas then start into the center shot settings.
11. Next adjustments for spine. (Bow weight, etc)

After you think you have all that right, Then go onto micro tuning for groups.

Couple of thoughts..

Any changes you make, you may have to recheck all the above adjustments.
Record everything. Change and result of change.
Do only one or two adjustments over several days worth of shooting. How consistent your shooting and form will affect how well the adjustments affect your groups/scores. Fatigue will wreck havic with tuning..
And lastly, In MOST cases, (clearance issues aside) Form will generally trump fine tuning.

I'm Not saying it's wrong to tune or that tuning should not be done.. I do believe however that for most of the recreational shooters out there, WAY TO MUCH emphasis is put on the "perfect" tune. That being said, I will also tell you that I love to tune and love to tinker. and if your desire to tune is just another part of the enjoyment of the sport, by all means go for it. Learn everything you can about it. Learn what happens. Use the rest of the collective experience on AT to be mirrors and sounding boards.
 

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It doesn't matter which end you twist from. As soon as you put tension of the string, the twists will be evenly distributed along the string length.
Very true. See my earlier post however. What that does to the limbs may be different depending on a lot of other factors.

If you were talking about a compound shooter with a peep, however we may be having a totally different discussion.. Any one remember changing string lengths (twisting up strings) on a compound to fine tune draw length?. Uh Oh, dating myself..
 
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