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Discussion Starter #1
I watched an interesting video today that mentioned how some companies want their engineers to design their product so they don't last as long as they possibly could. For example: My friend has a buddy that is a mechanical engineer that designs dentist chairs, and was asked to redesign a chair so that it only lasted a fraction of the time that it could have been designed for. By doing this, the dentist offices are forced to buy new chairs more often. This got me thinking about archery, and brought up an interesting question; are bow companies paying their engineers to not only design a high performance bow, but to also design them so that they don't last as long as they could? What do you guys think?
 

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THwack--CRASH
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i think you need more "tin fold" for your head!
 

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Or armadillo helmets.....

As for bows, they are designing for performance.
Maybe a byproduct is shorter string life, but materials are far better. Its evident how well they hold tune.
Carbon, 7000 series aluminum, 6000 series.....
Mostly machined parts......
Limbs tested to longer duty cycles.....

Think the logic is flawed.
Fwiw, I dont know of anyone in the field that designs for inferior product.
 

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(aka lug nut)
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I watched an interesting video today that mentioned how some companies want their engineers to design their product so they don't last as long as they possibly could. For example: My friend has a buddy that is a mechanical engineer that designs dentist chairs, and was asked to redesign a chair so that it only lasted a fraction of the time that it could have been designed for. By doing this, the dentist offices are forced to buy new chairs more often. This got me thinking about archery, and brought up an interesting question; are bow companies paying their engineers to not only design a high performance bow, but to also design them so that they don't last as long as they could? What do you guys think?

Riser
limbs...............multi-layer composite blanks...solid blanks
bearings..........roller bearings, sleeve bearings, no bearings..just a bushing
axles..............no worries
cams..............some are beefier..some as thin pancake designs
bowstrings

The bowstrings are a maintenance item,
so these need to be replaced on a regular basis.

Depending if you are looking at the $400 range of entry level new bows
or if you are talking $1500 and up range of top of the line bows...

not so much.

Designs seem to be rock solid.
 

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THwack--CRASH
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I'm going to ignore this unneeded comment.
that is exactly what you asked for.....(what do you guys think) and i responded!

how long before you would be out-of business doing that!
you make it cheaper ,if you want ,or make it better ,at a higher price....either way
 

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Look at the auto parts industry, "Planned obsolescence" and job security is common. LOL
 

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I do not think that is the intent of the bow manufacturers. They are working to build lighter bows and the result of that is probably a little less durability.

However, I don't think it matters very much. Modern compound bows will last far longer than most of us want to keep them. The designs and performance have been increasing so much over the last couple of decades, that a bow is obsolete long before it's durability comes into question.

JMHO,
Allen
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That's exactly what I was thinking but I've heard of companies out there that do purposefully design their products to not last as long. That way consumers have to buy them more often.
 

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Heavy Hitter
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Compound shooters are always looking for the latest and greatest, theres no need to when theres fanatics (like myself) always looking at the newest model
 

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Never Forget
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that is exactly what you asked for.....(what do you guys think) and i responded!

How long before you would be out-of business doing that!
You make it cheaper ,if you want ,or make it better ,at a higher price....either way

x 2
 

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Oblivious to the Shills
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Planned obsolescence is designed into many consumer products; particularly electronics. To think it wouldn't be incorporated into another area of manufacturing in naive.

BTW, I'm a dentist. You wouldn't mind pm'n me that company would you? Those units can run upwards of $20k and not cool if they are deliberately messing with you.
 

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(aka lug nut)
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Planned obsolescence is designed into many consumer products; particularly electronics. To think it wouldn't be incorporated into another area of manufacturing in naive.

BTW, I'm a dentist. You wouldn't mind pm'n me that company would you? Those units can run upwards of $20k and not cool if they are deliberately messing with you.
Very true for electronics.

Not a good idea for a compound bow.
Compound bows are failure tested, dry fire tested
to destructively determine the failure point, to quantitatively determine the actual safety factor,
the yield stresses, etc.

When a bow riser goes under a structural failure, it's not pretty.
A cam folding under full load, also would not be pretty.
 

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Not exactly true for electronics, the HW components will last quite some time if kept in an average room environment, what does get obsolete, is either the software features or the next generation of parts have better specs thus making the next generation of hardware better, meaning faster, less power hungry, more sensitive, etc.

Designing for failure, is a disaster

croc4
 

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Planned obsolescence is designed into many consumer products; particularly electronics. To think it wouldn't be incorporated into another area of manufacturing in naive.

BTW, I'm a dentist. You wouldn't mind pm'n me that company would you? Those units can run upwards of $20k and not cool if they are deliberately messing with you.
X2 ^^^ am curious as well which dental chair manufacturer that was
 

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X's R Us
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I don't think so. At least for products that could cause bodily harm if failure occured.
 

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Harley Davidson have been doing it for a while now...Crank runout problems on the Twin cam engines... High Mileage incentive programs... it all adds up to selling more bikes.

Apple... Your Iphone wasnt designed to last forever...that'd make no sense.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Planned obsolescence is designed into many consumer products; particularly electronics. To think it wouldn't be incorporated into another area of manufacturing in naive.

BTW, I'm a dentist. You wouldn't mind pm'n me that company would you? Those units can run upwards of $20k and not cool if they are deliberately messing with you.
I never said they WERE doing it, I just thought to myself "what if they are?"
Why call me naive and then expect me to help you? That doesn't make a lot of sense. But I don't know what company it was.
 
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