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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have a good write up on the different sting materials out there? I’m looking for something that explains the pros, cons and differences between each type of material. I can piece together bits and pieces from tidbits or references in some threads, but I haven’t seen a comprehensive write up telling for example the difference between D97, D75, BCY, BCYX, B50, BCY 8125G, 452x. It’s all very confusing.


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B50 is dacron. You will find dacron bowstrings on the $100 3 piece takedown beginner recurve bows. A dacron string will stretch forever, so you have to add twists nearly every time you string the recurve bow, to get to the proper brace height. If you have a wooden recurve bow and the limb tips are not reinforced, then, you need to use a dacron (B50) bowstring, e.g., one piece wooden recurve bow from the 1950s, with unreinforced limb tips.
 

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Does anyone have a good write up on the different sting materials out there? I’m looking for something that explains the pros, cons and differences between each type of material. I can piece together bits and pieces from tidbits or references in some threads, but I haven’t seen a comprehensive write up telling for example the difference between D97, D75, BCY, BCYX, B50, BCY 8125G, 452x. It’s all very confusing.


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452X is the stand by, oldest of the compound bowstring materials. Super durable, and sometimes can get fuzzy after extended use, so might need a regular application of bowstring wax. 452X is know for holding your bow tuning settings really well, meaning the cables do not stretch. So, when you tune the bow by adding twists/removing twists to get your cam timing correct, to get your draw length correct, to get your max draw weight correct, 452X will keep those tuning settings for you, quite nicely.
 

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Does anyone have a good write up on the different sting materials out there? I’m looking for something that explains the pros, cons and differences between each type of material. I can piece together bits and pieces from tidbits or references in some threads, but I haven’t seen a comprehensive write up telling for example the difference between D97, D75, BCY, BCYX, B50, BCY 8125G, 452x. It’s all very confusing.


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So, if 452X is the old guy on the block, then BCYX is the new kid on the block. Lots of great reviews for BCY X.
 

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Does anyone have a good write up on the different sting materials out there? I’m looking for something that explains the pros, cons and differences between each type of material. I can piece together bits and pieces from tidbits or references in some threads, but I haven’t seen a comprehensive write up telling for example the difference between D97, D75, BCY, BCYX, B50, BCY 8125G, 452x. It’s all very confusing.


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What about 8125G? 8125 G is the Gore Tex fiber version of 8215. So, what's the deal with 8125 or 8125G? 8125 is a tiny bit springy, so you get a wee bit of rebound effect. Results in a softer feel when you shoot the arrow, as compared to a bow with 452X. Might notice a tiny bit of more speed for a bow fitted with 8125 or 8190. What's 8190? 8190 is another bowstring material, that is a tiny bit springy. So, like 8125, softer feel on the shot. 8125 is popular with the recurve crowd. 8190 was kinda popular fo ra short time, with the compound bows, seeking a tiny bit more speed.
 

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Does anyone have a good write up on the different sting materials out there? I’m looking for something that explains the pros, cons and differences between each type of material. I can piece together bits and pieces from tidbits or references in some threads, but I haven’t seen a comprehensive write up telling for example the difference between D97, D75, BCY, BCYX, B50, BCY 8125G, 452x. It’s all very confusing.


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BCY is BCY Fibers, one of two major companies that make bowstring material and serving thread. Brownell is the other company.
 

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Does anyone have a good write up on the different sting materials out there? I’m looking for something that explains the pros, cons and differences between each type of material. I can piece together bits and pieces from tidbits or references in some threads, but I haven’t seen a comprehensive write up telling for example the difference between D97, D75, BCY, BCYX, B50, BCY 8125G, 452x. It’s all very confusing.


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D97 is a bowstring material that the recurve folks like to use. D75 is from 2004, a very very old bowstring material.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One more question—how many strands are needed/recommended for various draw weights?


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Today, there are two major trademarked fibers that make up bowstrings: Dacron by DuPont which is a polyester fiber and Dyneema by DSM which is an Ultra High Modulus Polyethelyne fiber. Two major bowstring companies, BCY and Brownell, use these fibers, sometimes mixed with other fibers like Gore or Vectran, to make string material that they sell to people like us. Dacron is sold as B50 by Brownell and B500 or B55 by BCY. For the purposes of bowstrings, Dacron is considered to be stretchy and Dyneema is considered to be low stretch. Dyneema is sold in different formulations as the fiber has evolved over time which is to say DSM moved a molecule or two around and made the fiber a little stronger or stretch a little less or something. The current variations of Dyneema for bowstrings(by BCY) are:
SK 75- sold as Dynaflite 97 by BCY
SK 78 - originally sold as Dynaflite 10, now known as Force 10 and marketed as a crossbow string by BCY
SK 90 - sold as 8190 mixed with Gore fiber and 8190f without Gore fiber. Also mixed with Vectran and sold as BCY X
SK 99 - Mercury by BCY and mixed with Vectran as X99 also by BCY

Brownell has their own names for the different combinations but I dont keep up with those since I use BCY products. There are other combinations (and fibers) of course, 450plus, 452, 8125, 8125g etc. which is just a particular combination of fibers to achieve some desired characteristic. Generally, Vectran is added to eliminate stretch and Gore is added to increase abrasion resistance. They all work well for different things depending on what is most important to you, the key is that they all work well and the differences are highly individual for feel to the archer. Go to BCY and Brownells websites and you can read what fibers make up the different strings then do individual searches on the different ones to help narrow your field. There really is a ton of information and it would be difficult to give a comprehensive explanation of everything. Just to avoid confusing the nomenclature remember...Big chemical companies make and name fibers that make their way to BCY and Brownell. BCY and Brownell spin those fibers (sometimes mixed with other fibers) into string and change the name. They put the string onto little spools and sell them to us.
 

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Today, there are two major trademarked fibers that make up bowstrings: Dacron by DuPont which is a polyester fiber and Dyneema by DSM which is an Ultra High Modulus Polyethelyne fiber. Two major bowstring companies, BCY and Brownell, use these fibers, sometimes mixed with other fibers like Gore or Vectran, to make string material that they sell to people like us. Dacron is sold as B50 by Brownell and B500 or B55 by BCY. For the purposes of bowstrings, Dacron is considered to be stretchy and Dyneema is considered to be low stretch. Dyneema is sold in different formulations as the fiber has evolved over time which is to say DSM moved a molecule or two around and made the fiber a little stronger or stretch a little less or something. The current variations of Dyneema for bowstrings(by BCY) are:
SK 75- sold as Dynaflite 97 by BCY
SK 78 - originally sold as Dynaflite 10, now known as Force 10 and marketed as a crossbow string by BCY
SK 90 - sold as 8190 mixed with Gore fiber and 8190f without Gore fiber. Also mixed with Vectran and sold as BCY X
SK 99 - Mercury by BCY and mixed with Vectran as X99 also by BCY
Good breakdown.
SK 90 is no longer available to BCY and Brownell. The materials made from it will no longer be available once their stock of aw materials are used up.
Some colors are limited now and most will be gone this year from what I've heard
 
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