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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All,

I recently received my new Spot Hogg scroll sight (Fast Eddie XL) and I’m running into issues getting the tape honed in. Full disclosure - I’m using the tape provided by Spot Hogg.

At present, I’ve done the initial set up and installed a tape that appears to be right on. Though I’m not the greatest shooter, I can comfortably put arrows on target in a 3.5 to 4 inch group at 40 yards. Shooting from 20 to 40 everything appears to be exactly where it needs to be. When I stretch out the range, though my groups open up a little (6 to 8 inches) they are not discernibly high or low. In short, the markings on the tape appear to closely match what I’m seeing down range.

Last night I went out on the 3D course and ran into all sorts of problems. Despite ranging the targets (range finder has accurate TBR out to 70 yards) I found myself shooting everything from a yard under or several over the marked range on the sight to get my arrows where they needed to be. There was zero consistency. The only constant appeared to be that the issue was more pronounced on angled shots. However, only one target was over 80 and the rest were well within my range finder’s capabilities. In addition, I know the sight was leveled out properly when it was installed so I’m doubtful that I’m dealing with a problem with my 3rd axis.

At present I’ve been tinkering with this sight for about two weeks and I’m starting to get a little nervous about not being able to rely upon the marked yardage. As such, any insights regarding how to troubleshoot would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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Shootin and Cussin
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I'm going to bet it is a form issue. Most folks, especially new shooters, have a real problem with form on angled shots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm going to bet it is a form issue. Most folks, especially new shooters, have a real problem with form on angled shots.
It’s totally possible. Any chance you can elaborate on what I could be doing? I’m headed back out tonight so I could always post a pic.
 

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Sounds like a form or shooter problem, not a sight or sight tape issue. If you are high sometimes and low others and you are having more issues with angled shots, that tells me that it is form related or your range finder is not giving you the proper cuts for the angled shots.
 

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Shootin and Cussin
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It’s totally possible. Any chance you can elaborate on what I could be doing? I’m headed back out tonight so I could always post a pic.
Try drawing the bow level then bending at the waist. Keep "the barrel of the gun" straight. Do you know that term related to archery?
 

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1. How reliable is your rangefinder? A lot of rangefinders give bogus read outs too often on 3d targets.
2. It's easy to use a different shooting form on angled shots. This will almost always have your arrow hitting a good bit different. Put a little more heel on the bow and you'll send the arrow out the top. Use less heel and the arrow will fall out the bottom.
3. One of the challenges of 3D is making good shots on targets with poor footing or odd angles.

It can be a multitude of reason as to why you hit differently on 3d targets than on "spot" targets. First off make sure you have the correct tape by taking your time and being sure the longest and shortest marks on "on". After that set your indicator at the average distance you will shoot 3D. I shoot ASA tournaments in a 50 yard and I know from experience that our "average" this year is somewhere around 44.5 - 46 yards. I stand 44 yards and shoot a lot until I know I have the indicator exactly right at that distance. If it's perfect at 44 yards I can't be but so off at 35 - 50 yards.

I'll start with a typical issue, using different sight pictures for "dots" and for 3d targets. For example, I shoot indoor spots all winter and I tend to aim at X's by aiming over the top of the pin and staring at the middle of the bullseye. For 3D I aim by covering up what I want to hit with the pin. Consequently, the first couple of 3D shoots after indoor season I might hit 3d targets a little high because I set the sight indicator using an "indoor sight picture" but when shooting the 3D target I cover the 12 ring up entirely with the pin so the arrow hits a bit high. Make sure you aren't aiming at "dots" on paper targets differently from how you aim at a spot on a 3D target.
 
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If i read your post correctly; your misses on the 3d range were ups and downs; NOT left and rights; correct? That rules out a 3rd axis issue; which would be a left/right miss when shooting uphill or downhill. If you picked out your sight tape using 20 and 40 as your reference (or sight in) distances; that could be the problem...40 isn't really far enough; and 20 is too close to discern slight misses that turn into bigger misses downrange. I would suggest using 30 and 60 and see if you end up with the same tape. It could also be the 3d targets themselves; when you are shooting at a dot; you have a very defined and specific spot to aim at; with a 3d target; not so much. You may be aiming at where you think the 10 ring is; but not where it actually is. If you are not using binos; you should definitely use them; and try to locate exactly where the center of 10 ring is; then aim at that spot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If i read your post correctly; your misses on the 3d range were ups and downs; NOT left and rights; correct? That rules out a 3rd axis issue; which would be a left/right miss when shooting uphill or downhill. If you picked out your sight tape using 20 and 40 as your reference (or sight in) distances; that could be the problem...40 isn't really far enough; and 20 is too close to discern slight misses that turn into bigger misses downrange. I would suggest using 30 and 60 and see if you end up with the same tape. It could also be the 3d targets themselves; when you are shooting at a dot; you have a very defined and specific spot to aim at; with a 3d target; not so much. You may be aiming at where you think the 10 ring is; but not where it actually is. If you are not using binos; you should definitely use them; and try to locate exactly where the center of 10 ring is; then aim at that spot.
I should have clarified. I did calibrate the sight at 20/60 per Spot Hogg’s instructions. And yes you are correct, my misses are up/down not left right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
1. How reliable is your rangefinder? A lot of rangefinders give bogus read outs too often on 3d targets.
2. It's easy to use a different shooting form on angled shots. This will almost always have your arrow hitting a good bit different. Put a little more heel on the bow and you'll send the arrow out the top. Use less heel and the arrow will fall out the bottom.
3. One of the challenges of 3D is making good shots on targets with poor footing or odd angles.

It can be a multitude of reason as to why you hit differently on 3d targets than on "spot" targets. First off make sure you have the correct tape by taking your time and being sure the longest and shortest marks on "on". After that set your indicator at the average distance you will shoot 3D. I shoot ASA tournaments in a 50 yard and I know from experience that our "average" this year is somewhere around 44.5 - 46 yards. I stand 44 yards and shoot a lot until I know I have the indicator exactly right at that distance. If it's perfect at 44 yards I can't be but so off at 35 - 50 yards.

I'll start with a typical issue, using different sight pictures for "dots" and for 3d targets. For example, I shoot indoor spots all winter and I tend to aim at X's by aiming over the top of the pin and staring at the middle of the bullseye. For 3D I aim by covering up what I want to hit with the pin. Consequently, the first couple of 3D shoots after indoor season I might hit 3d targets a little high because I set the sight indicator using an "indoor sight picture" but when shooting the 3D target I cover the 12 ring up entirely with the pin so the arrow hits a bit high. Make sure you aren't aiming at "dots" on paper targets differently from how you aim at a spot on a 3D target.
All good advice, when you’re taking about putting “heel” on the bow can specify what you mean? The big thing I notice on these angled shots is that it’s easy for my form to be compromised and all I try to do is match my “standard” form as closely as possible. That in mind, I would appreciate any guidance on what “good” form looks like when taking angled shots. It’s definitely a weak spot in my archery education.
 

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I’m not a good enough technical shooter to give you advice but I will echo the comments on how a 3-d target can prove to be more difficult to aim at a specific location, I deal with that sometimes and find that I seem to do better when fine tuning my setup to use a target with a very small specific aim location. Also, like others said your rangefinder can cause problems as well. This week I tried to show off for a buddy and sent a 70 yard arrow over a target, after I found my arrow buried up in grass beyond my target I realized I’d ranged wrong and at 70 yards a few yards of error makes a big difference with my 460 grain arrows.


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If you are missing up and down, I would say that your anchor point is not consistent. The slightly movement in that can change your shot placement. Thats what it sounds like to me anyways. Focus on making sure your anchor is consistent.

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Shootin and Cussin
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I do not.
In very simple terms..... The Barrel of the Gun is when your back shoulder, front shoulder, front elbow and front wrist are all in a straight line together.
 

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You can not use a 3D target for sighting in. You need a bullseye target or a target with a horizontal line for aiming. Spend extra time getting good marks and only use the good shots. Check your arrows, make sure the fletching is good, the nocks are straight and the points/inserts are true. Buy an arrow spinner to check the arrows. Number your arrows, will help determine if a specific arrow is bad. You may have done some or all of these ideas, be certain it's not the equipment.
Angle compensated range finders are based on an average. They may be right on or close for your set-up. The new Leopold uses the Archers Advantage program. You input your information for an exact reading.
 

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best advise is to get a caliper from you general hardware store and go from there I usually site in at 20-60 yards to get a more accurate site tape with arrow drop
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
UPDATE: So I shot last night and this morning and here are some takeaways.

First, I made sure to range all the targets on the standard archery range before I shot. I found out that after 30 yards my indicator usually ends up being a yard higher than the ranged distance. I’ve taken this too mean that I should probably use the next sight tape down. Unlike on the 3D course, the amount of fall was uniform on the range.

Second, this all leads me to believe my troubles on the course were primarily due to improper form and lack of attention to my shot process. Though there is a difference in my sight tape, it’s not enough to account for the radical/inconsistent changes I saw on the course. Considering my equipment checks out, the only remaining variable is me. I’m going to make a concerted effort to be more deliberate next time I’m on the course and see if things improve.

I appreciate all the advice. Thanks!
 
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