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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a semi-finished longbow from Dan Quillian Archery Traditions. It's cherry with a hickory back.

I also have some new walnut parts to put on my canoe. I plan to use Watco Exterior Wood Finish ("Watco oil") on the canoe parts.

Does anyone know if this would be a reasonable finish to use on the bow?

What ARE the preferred finishes to use on a traditional bow?

Thanks for any information,
Bob Scott
 

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Good question and I'm not sure to be honest except that I know of a bunch of rifle builders who use Watco. It's good stuff. I can't see why it wouldn't be excellent for the bow. My selfbow is finished in a mixture of beeswax and linspeed oil. I also us Fornby's oil on a lot of my wood projects and arrows. I like that hand rubbed look. Gives wood a nice warm finish.

I'd love to hear what anyone else has used also.

By the way, those Quinlan bows are pretty nice for a small amount of money. I was looking at them myself for a light poundage practice bow or to give as presents to "likely archery candidates".
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply.

I can't think of any reason NOT to use the Watco oil, but I figured I better ask!

The bow is from Dan Quillian Archery Traditions:
http://www.archerytraditions.com/archerytradi8.html

I figured it was an inexpensive way to try a decent longbow. Four of my buddies and I ordered them.

Good shooting,
Bob

Tejas Raz said:
Good question and I'm not sure to be honest except that I know of a bunch of rifle builders who use Watco. It's good stuff. I can't see why it wouldn't be excellent for the bow. My selfbow is finished in a mixture of beeswax and linspeed oil. I also us Fornby's oil on a lot of my wood projects and arrows. I like that hand rubbed look. Gives wood a nice warm finish.

I'd love to hear what anyone else has used also.

By the way, those Quinlan bows are pretty nice for a small amount of money. I was looking at them myself for a light poundage practice bow or to give as presents to "likely archery candidates".
 

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sound like a good choice of woods. cherry for it's compression strength and hickory for tensile strength. if you have access to a sprayer, check out fuller plast. i used just plain old minwax spar urethane on my recurve. i have had no problems with the finish cracking at all, and if you take your time with it and do six or seven coats. it looks fantastic.
don
 

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For the casual bowyer, Minwax Helmsman spar urethane (spray can)is great. Six coat of gloss (for durability and waterproofness) followed by two coats of satin (for dull finish).

Birchwood Casey makes Tru-Oil Gunstock finish. It provides a very durable finish that is easily applied and touched up (using fingers to apply). It's only downside is that it is glossy, though that can be fixed with unbuffed paste wax or to some extent, steel wool.

Paraffin is another easy to apply finish that is extremely waterproof. Simply use a heat gun to drip the wax on the bow, heat again to allow it to flow in the wood, then wipe the molten excess away with lint-free paper towels. It gives bows a wonderful satin lustre. That's one I've only seen, but plan to try soon.

If you have access to an air compressor and air brush, Thunderbird Edurance Epoxy is a professional grade bow finish that is extremely durable and waterproof.
 

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Flecto brand - Varathane

I use a finish called Varathane. A bowyer recommended it to me. It's made by a company called Flecto. You can pick it up at hardware stores and even Wal-Mart. Get the high gloss in a spray can. The high gloss is the best for sealing the wood against moisture. Do about 6 coats and then lightly steel wool it for a non-glossy appearence. I've used it on a couple of my bows and it seems to work great.

JP
 

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Would this be a good bow for me?

I am giving this bow some serious thought, but wanted to ask you guys a few questions first. I currently shoot a compund at 60# and was wondering if this long bow would be a good place to start. Also, what would be the right poundage to get? Thanks for the help and advice you guys always offer.

Jim
 

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shooting a compound at 60 lbs. is a lot different than a longbow at 60 lbs. you will be holding the entire 60 lbs. also your draw length will most likely drop a couple inches. if you've never shot traditional, you might want to start out around 50 lbs. a lot of people get discouraged because they are overbowed in the beginning. it's just no fun when you struggle with too much poundage.
don
 

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Does anyone know if these bows are made in a left handed version? They look like a great deal.

Thanks,
Jeremy
 
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